Kevin Mawae

Kevin James Mawae (/məˈwaɪ/; born January 23, 1971) is a former American football center who played in the National Football League (NFL) for sixteen seasons and is currently a member of the Arizona State University coaching staff. He played college football for Louisiana State University (LSU), where he was a four-year starter. He was picked by the Seattle Seahawks in the 1994 NFL Draft, and also played for the New York Jets and Tennessee Titans.

Mawae was selected for the Pro Bowl eight times, including six consecutive occasions (1999–2004), and was a seven-time All-Pro. He also served two terms as NFLPA president, which coincided with the 2011 NFL lockout. He later served as an assistant offensive line coach for the Chicago Bears. He was elected into the Pro Football Hall of Fame in 2019.

Kevin Mawae
refer to caption
Mawae with the Tennessee Titans in 2008
Arizona State Sun Devils
Position:Offensive analyst
Personal information
Born:January 23, 1971 (age 48)
Savannah, Georgia
Height:6 ft 4 in (1.93 m)
Weight:289 lb (131 kg)
Career information
High school:Leesville (LA)
College:LSU
NFL Draft:1994 / Round: 2 / Pick: 36
Career history
As player:
As coach:
Career highlights and awards
Career NFL statistics
Games played:241
Games started:238
Player stats at NFL.com
Player stats at PFR

Early years

A military brat, Mawae grew up wherever his father, Sgt. 1st Class David Mawae, was stationed. Born in Savannah, Georgia, while his father served at Hunter Army Airfield, he spent three years of his childhood (ages 5–7) in Fort Riley, Kansas, and then five years (ages 8–12) in Hanau, (Germany) when his father was stationed at Fliegerhorst Army Airfield. It was in Hanau where Mawae began playing football.[1][2] His father was then stationed at Fort Polk, near Leesville, Louisiana. Mawae attended Leesville High School, where he was an all-state football selection and earned all-academic honors.[2]

College career

Mawae attended Louisiana State University, where he played for the LSU Tigers football team from 1989 to 1993. He was redshirted in 1989. He started seven games at left tackle and was a freshman All-SEC selection in 1990, and also was the Tigers' long snapper.

After his sophomore season, he was a first-team All-SEC selection, having played three different positions: left tackle (8 games), center (3 games), and left guard (1 game). As a junior, he played left tackle and was chosen second-team All-SEC and was a third-team All-American. For his senior season he moved from left tackle to center for all 11 games. He played in the Blue-Gray Game and Senior Bowl after his senior season. Mawae was inducted into the LSU Athletic Hall of Fame in 2007.[3]

Professional career

Seattle Seahawks

Mawae was originally drafted by the Seattle Seahawks in the second round (36th overall) of the 1994 NFL Draft. He was Louisiana State's highest selected offensive lineman since Bo Strange in 1961. Mawae saw his first pro action at right guard against the Oakland Raiders on September 11,[4] and never left the lineup after taking over early in the game versus the Indianapolis Colts. He finished the season playing in 14 games, starting the final 11 at right guard. After the season Mawae earned first-team All-Rookie honors from Pro Football Weekly/Pro Football Writers Association, College and Pro Football Newsweekly and Football News. In 1995, he started all 16 games at right guard, seeing time at center in two games.[5] He was moved to the center position at the start of his 1996 season and remained at that spot for the rest of his NFL career.

New York Jets

In 1998, Mawae was signed by the New York Jets. In his first season in New York, the Jets' offense averaged 357.2 yards per game (second-best in AFC and fourth-best in NFL), while controlling the ball for an average of 32:17 minutes per game (second-best in AFC and third-best in NFL), also helped running back Curtis Martin to rush for franchise-record eight 100-yard rushing games en route to 1,287-yard season. He started all 16 games.[2] In 1999, he was named to his first Pro Bowl on December 22, he did not miss a play for the second straight season and paved the way for Martin's then franchise-record of 1,464 yards rushing, and snapped to three different quarterbacks; Vinny Testaverde, Rick Mirer and Ray Lucas.[2]

During the 2000 NFL season, he was member of the line that tied Indianapolis Colts for fewest sacks allowed during regular season with 20. Also helped Jets offense average 337.2 yards per game was the 12th best in NFL and the passing offense averaged 245.3 yards per game (sixth in NFL). Mawae earned his second consecutive starting spot as AFC team Pro Bowl center he was selected to the Pro Bowl on six consecutive occasions (1999–2004). In 2002, he underwent offseason shoulder surgery to repair damage to left rotator cuff, he missed two preseason games but kept his consecutive games started streak by making 124th consecutive start in season opener against the Buffalo Bills.[2] His unbroken streak of 177 games came to an end in October 2005 with a serious triceps injury to his left arm, and he missed the rest of the season. On March 5, 2006, he was cut by the Jets.

Tennessee Titans

After being cut by the Jets, Mawae was signed by the Tennessee Titans nine days later on March 14, 2006. In his first season with Tennessee, he helped the offense rank third in the AFC and fifth in the NFL in rushing with 2,214 yards. The Titans set a franchise record by averaging 4.7 yards per carry, and the offensive line, led by Mawae, finished tied for 10th in the league with only 29 sacks allowed,[6] Titans running back Travis Henry finished 2006 with 1,211 rushing yards and rookie quarterback Vince Young was named AP Offensive Rookie of the Year.

In 2007, Mawae was voted team captain and started 14 games, helping LenDale White register his first career 1,000-yard season as he finished with 1,110.[7]

In 2009, Mawae was ranked fifth in a Sports Illustrated poll of "dirty players". The magazine surveyed 296 NFL players to come up with the ranking.[8] Mawae was quoted on the Titans' site as saying he was "proud" of the recognition because he plays the game hard, but conceded, "I’ve been known to leg whip a time or two. I've paid the price for those, both physically and in the pocket. Like when I ended Shawne Merriman's career. He made a legal but hard hit on Vince Young and the next play, I took his knee. He never recovered and I don't feel anything for him."[9]

On September 10, 2010, Mawae announced that he was retiring from the NFL after 16 years in the league. Mawae would be elected to his 7th and 8th Pro Bowl for the 2008 and 2009 seasons. His last game was the 2009 Pro Bowl in February 2010.

On February 2, 2019, Mawae was announced to be a part of the 2019 Pro Football Hall of Fame class.[10]

NFL Players Association

Mawae joined the NFLPA's executive committee in 2002,[11] was elected its president in March 2008, and was re-elected in 2010.[12] In September 2010, Mawae announced his retirement from the NFL,[13] however he continued to serve as president until the end of his term in March 2012.[14] Mawae's term coincided with the death of longtime NFLPA executive director Gene Upshaw,[15] and the 2011 NFL lockout, which Mawae has stated he believes hastened the end of his playing career.

During the NFL kickoff game broadcast in 2010, players from the New Orleans Saints and Minnesota Vikings "raised an index finger" as they took the field, a gesture Mawae has called "one of the proudest moments I ever had".[12]

According to Mawae, it was under his presidency that active players were present for negotiations of the collective bargaining agreement.[11] He has also served as an assistant coach in the annual NFLPA Collegiate Bowl.[16]

Coaching career

In 2016, Mawae joined the Chicago Bears coaching staff as an assistant offensive line coach.[17] He was not retained by the Bears for the 2017 season.[18]

In March 2018 Mawae joined the Arizona State University football staff as a quality control analyst where he was reunited with his former New York Jets head coach, Herm Edwards.[19]

Personal life

Mawae is of Hawaiian descent. Mawae is married to Tracy Dale Hicks, he proposed to her in the summer of 1992 at LSU Fan Day in front of 140 teammates, 10 coaches and 3,000 fans over the public address system,[3] the couple has a son, Kirkland (born 1997), and a daughter, Abigail (born 2000). The Mawaes were residing in Franklin, Tennessee, until selling the property in 2012.[20] Kevin and his family have since settled back in their home in Baton Rouge, Louisiana.

A few years into his NFL career, Mawae lost his brother, John, in a car accident. John, a former nose guard at LSU, left a profound effect on Kevin by establishing a strong faith prior to his death.[2] Mawae's tragic loss has allowed him to develop a strong Christian faith.[21]

Off the field

During the 2008 offseason, Mawae and his family spent two weeks in Africa with Children's Cup International Relief,[22] a missions organization that the Mawae family has helped support financially. They traveled primarily in Swaziland, Mozambique, Zambia and Tanzania.[2] He was Eddie Towne's favorite player in ESPN's hit show TILT. He created the First and Goal Challenge, a unique program to benefit Winthrop-University Hospital's outstanding Child Life Program and Pediatric Services.[23]

References

  1. ^ "Former NFL greats host Fort Polk youth football skills clinic, show support for hiring veterans". Fort Polk Guardian. November 30, 2012.
  2. ^ a b c d e f g Tennessee Titans Bio
  3. ^ a b 2007 LSU Athletic Hall of Fame Inductee: Kevin Mawae
  4. ^ Kevin Mawae: Game Logs, Season 1994
  5. ^ Kevin Mawae: Game Logs. Season 1995
  6. ^ NFL Stats: 2006 season
  7. ^ Lendale White: Career Stats
  8. ^ Dirtiest NFL player: Steelers' Ward
  9. ^ [1]
  10. ^ Wyatt, Jim (February 2, 2019). "Former Titans Lineman Kevin Mawae Elected to Pro Football Hall of Fame Class of 2019". TitansOnline.com. Retrieved February 2, 2019.
  11. ^ a b Partsch III, Raymond A. (January 14, 2013). "Hard lesson learned: Brother's death sets former Leesville High star on special path". Daily Town Talk. Archived from the original on June 30, 2013. Retrieved April 2, 2013.
  12. ^ a b Saraceno, Jon (October 21, 2010). "Mawae's labor of love: Fighting for players; President of union braces for NFL's bargaining battle". Retrieved April 1, 2013.
  13. ^ Walker, Theresa M. (September 10, 2010). "Mawae, NFLPA president, to retire after 16 seasons". The Washington Times. Associated Press. Retrieved April 2, 2013.
  14. ^ Maske, Mark (February 2, 2012). "Super Bowl 2012: Players union, NFL still talking about HGH blood tests". The Washington Post. Retrieved April 2, 2013.
  15. ^ Mullen, Liz (March 15, 2010). "Kevin Mawae Elected To Second Term {{subst:lc:As}} NFLPA President". Retrieved April 2, 2013.
  16. ^ "Kats' Diller to play in NFLPA all-star game later this month". The Huntsville Item. January 8, 2013. Retrieved April 2, 2013.
  17. ^ James, Jordan (September 7, 2016). "Report: Former LSU OL, NFL vet Kevin Mawae joins Chicago Bears". CBSSports.com. Retrieved January 3, 2017.
  18. ^ Campbell, Rich (January 24, 2017). "Former Bears assistant Kevin Mawae eyes new coaching gig, Hall of Fame nod". Chicago Tribune. Retrieved August 10, 2017.
  19. ^ ASU football adds former NFL offensive line standout Kevin Mawae as analyst
  20. ^ Former Star O-Lineman, NFLPA President Kevin Mawae Lists Tennessee Compound
  21. ^ Kevin Mawae: A Titan's Clash with Death
  22. ^ NFL Videos: Mawae´s influence
  23. ^ NY Jets' Kevin Mawae Helps Benefit Pediatric Patients

External links

1991 All-SEC football team

The 1991 All-SEC football team consists of American football players selected to the All-Southeastern Conference (SEC) chosen by various selectors for the 1991 college football season.

The Florida Gators won the conference, posting an undefeated conference record. Florida quarterback Shane Matthews repeated as SEC Player of the Year.

1998 All-Pro Team

The 1998 All-Pro Team is composed of the National Football League players that were named to the Associated Press, Pro Football Writers Association, and The Sporting News All-Pro Teams in 1998. Both first and second teams are listed for the AP team. These are the three teams that are included in Total Football II: The Official Encyclopedia of the National Football League. In 1998 the Pro Football Writers Association and Pro Football Weekly combined their All-pro teams, a practice with continues through 2008.

1999 All-Pro Team

The 1999 All-Pro Team is composed of the National Football League players that were named to the Associated Press, Pro Football Writers Association, and The Sporting News All-Pro Teams in 1999. Both first and second teams are listed for the AP team. These are the three teams that are included in Total Football II: The Official Encyclopedia of the National Football League. In 1999 the Pro Football Writers Association and Pro Football Weekly combined their All-pro teams, a practice with continues through 2008.

1999 New York Jets season

The 1999 New York Jets season was the 40th season for the team, the 30th in the National Football League and the third year and final year under Bill Parcells and

was also the last season that the Jets were under the ownership of the Hess family. Owner Leon Hess died before the season began and, per his directive, the team was to be sold after his death. The process for vetting potential buyers proceeded during the entire season and shortly after it concluded, the winning buyer was revealed as Johnson & Johnson heir Woody Johnson.

The Jets failed to improve upon their 12–4 record from 1998, when the Jets won the AFC East and ended the season with a loss in the AFC Championship Game. The team dealt with several devastating injuries to starters. Starting quarterback Vinny Testaverde suffered a ruptured Achilles tendon in the season opener against the New England Patriots, costing him the entire season. Starting running back Leon Johnson tore two knee ligaments in the same game and was also lost for the season.

Due to Testaverde’s injury, the Jets were forced to use three different quarterbacks during the season. Parcells used punter Tom Tupa, who had begun his career as a quarterback, to replace Testaverde in the opening game against the Patriots but pulled him in favor of Rick Mirer. Parcells acquired Mirer in a trade with the Green Bay Packers during the offseason and made room for Mirer by trading Glenn Foley to the Seattle Seahawks. After a 2-6 start to the season, Parcells went in another direction and replaced Mirer with third-stringer Ray Lucas, who won six of his eight starts to bring the team to an 8-8 finish.

Parcells announced his retirement shortly after the 1999 season concluded and announced that defensive coordinator Bill Belichick, who had been his designated successor, would take over. However, Belichick decided shortly after taking the position that he no longer wanted it and instead chose to become the head coach of the Patriots. Thus, Parcells promoted linebackers coach Al Groh to replace him while he stayed on for an additional year in the front office.

2000 All-Pro Team

The 2000 All-Pro Team is composed of the National Football League players that were named to the Associated Press, Pro Football Writers Association, and The Sporting News All-Pro Teams in 2000. Both first and second teams are listed for the AP team. These are the three teams that are included in Total Football II: The Official Encyclopedia of the National Football League. In 2000 the Pro Football Writers Association and Pro Football Weekly combined their All-pro teams, a practice with continues through 2008. In 2000 the AP did not have a separate “Fullback” position.

2000 New York Jets season

The 2000 New York Jets season was the 41st season for the team, and the 31st in the National Football League. It was also their first under the ownership of Woody Johnson, who purchased the team in January 2000 from the estate of former owner Leon Hess.

The team tried to improve upon its 8–8 record from 1999 under new head coach Al Groh, who became the successor for Bill Parcells after Bill Belichick abruptly resigned to take the same position with the New England Patriots. Although they managed to finish one game better than they had in 1999, their 9–7 record (including three losses to close the year) was not enough to make the playoffs.

Shortly after the season ended, Groh resigned as coach to take the head coaching position at the University of Virginia, his alma mater. Shortly after that, Parcells stepped down as Director of Football Operations and retired from football. Like his previous retirement, it proved only temporary and Parcells was back in the NFL in 2003 as the head coach of the Dallas Cowboys.

2001 All-Pro Team

The 2001 All-Pro Team comprises the National Football League players that were named to the Associated Press, Pro Football Writers Association, and The Sporting News All-Pro Teams in 2001. Both first and second teams are listed for the AP team. These are the three teams that are included in Total Football II: The Official Encyclopedia of the National Football League. In 2001 the Pro Football Writers Association and Pro Football Weekly combined their All-pro teams, a practice with continues through 2008. In 2001 the AP did not have a separate “fullback” position. Also, in 2001, the AP returned to choosing two inside linebackers, rather than one.

2001 New York Jets season

The 2001 New York Jets season was the 42nd season for the franchise, and the 32nd in the National Football League. The team tried to improve upon its 9–7 record from 2000. Under new head coach Herman Edwards, the Jets finished 10–6 and qualified for the final Wild Card position in the American Football Conference. They lost in the Wild Card round to the Oakland Raiders, 38–24.

2002 All-Pro Team

The 2002 All-Pro Team comprises the National Football League players that were named to the Associated Press, Pro Football Writers Association, and The Sporting News All-Pro Teams in 2002. Both first and second teams are listed for the AP team. These are the three teams that are included in Total Football II: The Official Encyclopedia of the National Football League. In 2002 the Pro Football Writers Association and Pro Football Weekly combined their All-pro teams, a practice with continues through 2008. In 2001 the AP did not have a separate “fullback” position. Also, in 2001, the AP returned to choosing two inside linebackers, rather than one.

2002 New York Jets season

The 2002 New York Jets season was the 43rd season for the team, and the 33rd in the National Football League. The team tried to improve upon its 10–6 record from 2001. The Jets overcame a 2–5 start to finish 9–7 and won their second AFC East division title.

After a heartbreaking 24–21 week 8 loss to the Cleveland Browns at the Meadowlands, head coach Herman Edwards gave his famous “You play to win the game” tirade in the post-game press conference. The mid-season debut of quarterback Chad Pennington helped lead the Jets to a 7–2 record down the stretch. After posting a stunning rout of the Indianapolis Colts by a score of 41–0 at the Meadowlands in the Wild Card round of the playoffs, they lost for the second year in a row to the Oakland Raiders, 30–10 in the Divisional round.

2002 Pro Bowl

The 2002 Pro Bowl was the NFL's all-star game for the 2001 season. The game was played on February 9, 2002, at Aloha Stadium in Honolulu, Hawaii. The final score was AFC 38, NFC 30. Rich Gannon of the Oakland Raiders was the game's MVP.

2003 New York Jets season

The 2003 New York Jets season was the 44th season for the team, and the 34th in the National Football League. The team tried to improve upon its 9–7 record from 2002 and defend its AFC East title, but the Jets failed to do so and finished with a record of 6–10.

2004 All-Pro Team

The 2004 All-Pro Team was composed of the National Football League players that were named to the Associated Press, Pro Football Writers Association, and The Sporting News All-Pro Teams in 2004. Both first and second teams are listed for the AP team. These are the three teams that are included in Total Football II: The Official Encyclopedia of the National Football League. In 2004, the Pro Football Writers Association and Pro Football Weekly combined their All-Pro teams, a practice with continues through 2008. In 2004, the AP reinstated the “Fullback” position.

2004 New York Jets season

The 2004 New York Jets season was the franchise’s 35th season in the National Football League and the 45th season overall.

The season began with the Jets attempting to improve on their 6–10 2003 record. The Jets started the season by winning their first five games, which constituted a franchise record. They ultimately finished 10–6, and clinched the fifth seed in the playoffs, reaching the postseason for the third time in four seasons.

They upset the AFC West champion San Diego Chargers in the Wild Card round, winning in overtime 20–17, but would lose in the Divisional round to the Pittsburgh Steelers, also by a score 20–17 in overtime.

2006 Tennessee Titans season

The 2006 Tennessee Titans season was the franchise’s 47th season overall, 37th with the league, and tenth in Tennessee. The season began with the Titans trying to improve on their 4–12 record in their 2005 season. The team improved to 8–8, but missed the playoffs for the third consecutive season.

The Titans signed Pittsburgh Steelers safety Chris Hope, Indianapolis Colts linebacker David Thornton, New England Patriots wide receiver David Givens and New York Jets center Kevin Mawae, and brought back defensive lineman Robaire Smith after he was released by the Houston Texans.

The Titans, with the third 2006 overall pick, chose Vince Young, star quarterback out of the University of Texas, and with their second round pick, picked USC running back LenDale White. Then, they used the rest of their picks on Penn St. Safety Calvin Lowry, North Carolina St. LB Stephen Tulloch, Miami University (OH) LB Terna Nande, Tennessee DT Jesse Mahelona, Wisconsin WR Jonathan Orr, Samford DB Cortland Finnegan, Utah LB Spencer Toone, and Utah RB Quinton Ganther.

However, the Titans were winless for five consecutive games before winning their first game against the Redskins in week 6.

Eugene Amano

Eugene Philip Amano (born March 1, 1982) is a former American football offensive lineman . Playing for the Tennessee Titans from 2004 to 2013 as both a center and guard, he replaced eight-time All-Pro selection Kevin Mawae as starting center in 2010. Amano is one of three NFL players to be born in the Philippines, along with Tim Tebow and Fred Jones.

List of Native Hawaiians

This is a list of notable Native Hawaiians.

To be included in this list, the person must have an English Wikipedia article showing they have Native Hawaiian heritage or must have references showing they have Native Hawaiian heritage and are notable.

Isabella Abbott, educator and scientist

Duke Aiona, politician

Eddie Aikau, surfer

Daniel K. Akaka, politician

D. G. Anderson, politician

S. Haunani Apoliona, activist

Bernice Pauahi Bishop, philanthropist

Kealii Blaisdell, traditional Hawaiian entertainer, original traditional Hawaiian song composer, great-grandson of Hawaiian author Joseph

Travis Browne, mixed martial artist

Jeff Chang

Sam Choy, chef, restaurateur, and television personality

Marcus Coloma, actor

Auli'i Cravalho, actress and singer

Ron Darling, former MLB pitcher

William Heath Davis, merchant and trader

Frank De Lima, comedian

William De Los Santos, poet, screenwriter, director

Adriano Directo Emperado, co-founder of Kajukenbo self-defense system

Russell Doane, mixed martial artist

Faith Evans, US marshal

Patricia Ford, model

Brickwood Galuteria, entertainer and party chairman

Sunny Garcia, surfer

Brian Haberlin, comic book artist

Clayton Hee, politician

Kaui Hart Hemmings, author

Don Ho, entertainer

Hoku Ho, singer

Max Holloway, mixed martial artist

Mark Keali'i Ho'omalu, musician and kumu hula

Kelly Hu, actress

Curtis Iaukea, politician

John Papa ʻĪʻī, an ali'i, politician and historian

Anuhea Jenkins, musician

Dick Jensen, singer

Maren Jensen, actress

Duke Paoa Kahanamoku, Olympian and World Ambassador of Surfing

Natasha Kai, professional soccer player

Charles Kalani, Jr., professional athlete

Montgomery Kaluhiokalani, surfer

Samuel Kamakau, historian

Israel Kamakawiwoʻole, musician, entertainer, and activist

Kamehameha the Great, first king of Hawaii

George Kanahele, author of books about native Hawaiians

Jason Kapono, NBA forward

Gilbert Lani Kauhi, often credited as Zulu, actor

Princess Abigail Kawananakoa, descendant of aliʻi

Prince Quentin Kawananakoa, heir presumptive throne of Hawaii, lawyer, politician

Mary Kaye, musician and singer

James Kealoha, politician

Charles Kekumano, Roman Catholic priest and first papal chamberlain of native Hawaiian ancestry

Esther Kia'aina, politician

Al Kikume, actor and stuntman

Samuel Wilder King, politician

Helio Koaʻeloa, missionary and candidate for sainthood

Jesse Kuhaulua, sumo wrestler

Kūkahi, musician

Brook Mahealani Lee, Miss Universe 1997

Eric Lee, musician

Steve Leialoha, comic book artist

Liliʻuokalani, last monarch of the Kingdom of Hawaiʻi

Agnes Lum, gravure idol, bikini model, actress and singer

Harry Maitey, first Hawaiian in Prussia

David Malo, historian

Jarah Mariano, model

Kevin Mawae, former president of the NFL Players Association

Maxine, model and professional wrestler

Michelle Maylene, adult film actress and model

Yancy Medeiros, mixed martial artist

Janet Mock, trans women's rights activist

Jason Momoa, actor

Leilani Munter, American race car driver and environmental activist

Don Muraco, professional wrestler

Kellye Nakahara, actress

Joseph Nawahi, politician and artist

Ruban Nielson, musician

Karl James Noons, mixed martial artist

Cheryl Moana Marie Nunes, musician and former Oakland Raiderette

David Nuuhiwa, surfer

Danny Ongais, race car driver

Dennis Pavao, Hawaiian Falsetto Singer and Musician

B. J. Penn, mixed martial artist

Herbert K. Pililaau, Medal of Honor recipient

Mary Kawena Pukui, scholar and educator

Keanu Reeves, actor

Rap Reiplinger, comedian

William S. Richardson, jurist

Marlene Sai, singer and actress

Nicole Scherzinger, singer

Ray Schoenke, former NFL player

Wini Shaw, actress

Micah Solusod, voice actor

Shannyn Sossamon, actress

David Strathairn, actor

Napua Stevens, entertainer, singer, hula dancer, musician, teacher, radio-TV personality, producer and author

Akebono, sumo wrestler

Freddie Tavares, helped design the Fender Stratocaster and other Fender products, steel guitarist

Nainoa Thompson, Polynesian navigator, Trustee for Kamehameha Schools

Kiana Tom, fitness trainer

Logan Tom, Olympic volleyball player

Haunani-Kay Trask, activist

Mililani Trask, activist

Brendon Urie, lead singer of Panic! at the Disco

Shane Victorino, professional baseball player for the Boston Red Sox

Kimo von Oelhoffen, former NFL player

John D. Waihee III, politician

Charlie Wedemeyer, athlete and author

Herman Wedemeyer, actor, football player, and politician

Robert William Wilcox, delegate to Congress

Jerome Williams, baseball player

Kailee Wong, professional football player

Kirby Wright, novelist and poet

Pro Football Hall of Fame

The Pro Football Hall of Fame is the hall of fame for professional American football, located in Canton, Ohio. Opened in 1963, the Hall of Fame enshrines exceptional figures in the sport of professional football, including players, coaches, franchise owners, and front-office personnel, almost all of whom made their primary contributions to the game in the National Football League (NFL); the Hall inducts between four and eight new enshrinees each year. The Hall of Fame's Mission is to "Honor the Heroes of the Game, Preserve its History, Promote its Values & Celebrate Excellence EVERYWHERE."

The Hall of Fame class of 2019 (Tony Gonzalez, Ed Reed, Champ Bailey, Ty Law, Kevin Mawae, Pat Bowlen, Gil Brandt, and Johnny Robinson) were selected into the Pro Football Hall of Fame by a 48-member selection committee and announced on February 2, 2019. Including the 2019 class, there are now a total of 326 members of the Hall of Fame.

Offense
Defense
Special Teams
2010
2011
2012
2013
2014
2017
Quarterbacks
Running backs
Wide receivers /
ends
Tight ends
Offensive
linemen
Pre-modern era
two-way players
Defensive
linemen
Linebackers
Defensive backs
Placekickers
and punters
Coaches
Contributors
NFLPA
AFLPA

This page is based on a Wikipedia article written by authors (here).
Text is available under the CC BY-SA 3.0 license; additional terms may apply.
Images, videos and audio are available under their respective licenses.