Kermit Alexander

Kermit Joseph Alexander (born January 4, 1941) is a former American football defensive back in the National Football League. He was on the Board of Directors for the Lott IMPACT Trophy, which is named after Pro Football Hall of Fame defensive back Ronnie Lott, and is awarded annually to college football's defensive IMPACT Player of the Year.[1]

Kermit Alexander
Born:January 4, 1941 (age 78)
New Iberia, Louisiana
Career information
Position(s)Defensive back
CollegeUCLA
High schoolLos Angeles (CA) Mount Carmel
AFL draft1963 / Round: 1 / Pick: 5
(By the Denver Broncos)
NFL draft1963 / Round: 1 / Pick: 8
Career history
As player
1963–1969San Francisco 49ers
1970–1971Los Angeles Rams
1972–1973Philadelphia Eagles
Career highlights and awards
Pro Bowls1 (1968)
Career stats

Professional career

Alexander was drafted by the San Francisco 49ers with the eighth pick in the first round of the 1963 NFL Draft. He was also drafted by the Denver Broncos of the American Football League with the fifth overall pick, but chose to sign with San Francisco. Alexander played alongside Pro Football Hall of Fame cornerback Jimmy Johnson. Alexander was selected to play in the Pro Bowl in 1968, after a season in which he had a career-high nine interceptions, including an interception he returned 66 yards for a touchdown. Alexander played for the 49ers from 1963 to 1969.

In his second year with the Los Angeles Rams in 1971, he returned one of his three interceptions 82 yards for a touchdown. He played one final season with the Philadelphia Eagles in 1973. Kermit was responsible for injuring Gale Sayers's right knee in a rolling tackle which shortened the career of the Bears star running back, and cost Sayers some of his extraordinary quickness.

In addition to playing defense, Alexander returned punts and kickoffs for all three teams. Both of his career punt returns for touchdowns came with San Francisco.[2]

Personal life

On August 31, 1984, Alexander's mother, sister and two nephews, ages 8 and 13, were murdered in South Central Los Angeles during a home invasion by members of the Rollin 60's Neighborhood Crips, whose intended victims lived two doors away.[3]

Alexander was initially planning on adopting one child from Haiti, but after meeting the child's four siblings, he ended up adopting all five. The five were in Haiti at the time of the earthquake in 2010, but survived and now live with Alexander and his wife, Tami.

See also

References

  1. ^ http://www.lottimpacttrophy.com/
  2. ^ https://www.pro-football-reference.com/players/A/AlexKe01.htm
  3. ^ “Cox Gets Death in Alexander Murders”, "The Los Angeles Times", May 1, 1986.

External links

  • Friend, Tom. "Kermit's Song". ESPN.com. Retrieved 2010-05-16.
1961 UCLA Bruins football team

The 1961 UCLA Bruins football team was an American football team that represented the University of California, Los Angeles during the 1961 college football season. In their fourth year under head coach Bill Barnes, the Bruins compiled a 7–4 record (3–1 conference) and finished in first place in the Athletic Association of Western Universities.UCLA's offensive leaders in 1961 were quarterbacks Bobby Smith and Mike Haffner with 327 passing yards each, Haffner with 703 rushing yards, and Kermit Alexander with 297 receiving yards.

1962 All-Pacific Coast football team

The 1962 All-Pacific Coast football team consists of American football players chosen by various organizations for All-Pacific Coast teams for the 1962 college football season.

1962 College Football All-America Team

The 1962 College Football All-America team is composed of college football players who were selected as All-Americans by various organizations and writers that chose College Football All-America Teams in 1962. The six selectors recognized by the NCAA as "official" for the 1962 season are (1) the American Football Coaches Association (AFCA), (2) the Associated Press (AP), (3) the Football Writers Association of America (FWAA), (4) the Newspaper Enterprise Association (NEA), (5) the Sporting News, and (6) the United Press International (UPI).

1962 UCLA Bruins football team

The 1962 UCLA Bruins football team was an American football team that represented the University of California, Los Angeles during the 1962 college football season. In their fifth year under head coach Bill Barnes, the Bruins compiled a 4–6 record (1–3 AAWU) and finished in fifth place in the Athletic Association of Western Universities.UCLA's offensive leaders in 1962 were quarterback Larry Zeno with 458 passing yards, Kermit Alexander with 472 rushing yards, and Mel Profit with 229 receiving yards.

1967 San Francisco 49ers season

The 1967 San Francisco 49ers season was the team's 18th year with the National Football League. The 49ers had two first round picks and drafted Heisman Trophy winner Steve Spurrier with one of those draft picks.

1968 San Francisco 49ers season

The 1968 San Francisco 49ers season was the team's 19th year with the National Football League.

1969 San Francisco 49ers season

The 1969 San Francisco 49ers season was the team's 20th year with the National Football League.

1970 Los Angeles Rams season

The 1970 Los Angeles Rams season was the team's 33rd year with the National Football League and the 25th season in Los Angeles. The team looked to improve on its 11-3 record from 1969. However, the Rams missed their mark by two games, and finished with a respectable 9-4-1 record. Despite the winning record, the team missed the playoffs for the 2nd time in 3 seasons.

1971 Los Angeles Rams season

The 1971 Los Angeles Rams season was the team's 34th year with the National Football League and the 26th season in Los Angeles. The team looked to improve on its 9-4-1 record from 1970. The Rams would finish one game below their goal, as they finished 8-5-1 and finished 2nd in the NFC West behind the San Francisco 49ers. The Rams would start out strong, as they started 4-1-1 in their first 6 games before splitting their final 8 games. Despite sweeping the 49ers on the season (the 49ers would win the NFC West at 9-5), a crucial tie against the Atlanta Falcons in week 2 proved to doom the Rams, because had they beaten Atlanta, they would've clinched the NFC West by virtue of their sweep over the 49ers.

1972 Los Angeles Rams season

The 1972 Los Angeles Rams season was the team's 35th year with the National Football League and the 27th season in Los Angeles. The Rams looked to improve on their 8-5-1 record from 1971 and make the playoffs for the first time since 1969. After a win against the New Orleans Saints at home, the Rams tied the Chicago Bears, 13-13, their third straight season with a tie. This was followed by an embarrassing loss to the Atlanta Falcons, 31-3. However, the Rams would then pick up their winning ways, beating the San Francisco 49ers 31-7 at home, the Philadelphia Eagles 34-3 in Philly, and the Cincinnati Bengals 15-12 at home. However, following this 3 game winning streak, the Rams struggled, losing several close games as they lost 5 of their last six to end the season 6-7-1. This would be the last time the Rams would miss the playoffs until 1981, as they started a dynasty the next season that saw them win the NFC West 7 consecutive times from 1973-1979. They also finished in 2nd place in 1980.

1973 Philadelphia Eagles season

The 1973 Philadelphia Eagles season was the franchise’s 41st in the National Football League. Although they improved upon their 2–11–1 record of the previous season, they failed to complete a winning record for the seventh consecutive season and failed to reach the playoffs for the thirteenth straight year.

Byron "Whizzer" White NFL Man of the Year Award

The Byron "Whizzer" White NFL Man of the Year Award has been awarded by the National Football League Players Association continuously since 1967. The most recent winner, for the 2017 season, is Chris Long of the Philadelphia Eagles. The award honors work in the community as the NFL player who best served his team, community and country in the spirit of Byron "Whizzer" White, who was a Supreme Court justice, professional American football player, naval officer, and humanitarian. Past winners have included Drew Brees, Warrick Dunn, Gale Sayers, Bart Starr, Archie Manning, Peyton Manning, Troy Vincent, and Ken Houston. Prior to his ascension to the Supreme Court, White had been All-Pro three times (1938, 1940, 1941) and the NFL rushing champion twice (1938 and 1940).

The 2001 recipient, Michael McCrary, was the child in the Supreme Court case Runyon v. McCrary (1976) in which Justice White had participated nearly a quarter of a century before McCrary's award. White had dissented from the position taken by the lawyers for McCrary.

List of National Football League annual kickoff return yards leaders

This is a list of National Football League kickoff returners who have led the regular season in kickoff return yards each year.

Lott Trophy

The Lott IMPACT Trophy is presented annually to the college football defensive IMPACT player of the year. IMPACT is an acronym for: Integrity, Maturity, Performance, Academics, Community, and Tenacity. The award purports to equally recognize the personal character of the winning player as well as his athletic excellence. The award selection is voted on by members of the national media, previous finalists, the board of directors of the Pacific Club IMPACT Foundation. The award is named in honor of College Football Hall of Fame and Pro Football Hall of Fame defensive back, Ronnie Lott.

Mount Carmel High School (Los Angeles)

Mount Carmel High School was a Roman Catholic all-boys' high school located in Los Angeles, in the U.S. state of California. It was located in the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Los Angeles. It was founded by the Carmelite Order in 1935. The school closed in 1976, and was demolished in 1983. The school was designated a Los Angeles Historic-Cultural Monument in 1979.

Russell White

Russell Lamar White (born December 15, 1970) is a former American college and professional football player who was a running back in the National Football League (NFL) for a single season in 1993. White played college football for the University of California, Berkeley, and was recognized as an All-American. Thereafter, he played professionally for the NFL's Los Angeles Rams.

Tiequon Cox

Tiequon Aundray "Lil Fee" Cox (born December 1, 1965) is a convicted murderer currently incarcerated in San Quentin State Prison.

Cox became one of the prime suspects of a mass murder investigation concerning the deaths of Ebora Alexander, aged 59, Dietra Alexander, aged 25, two boys Damon Bonner, aged 6, and Damani Garner-Alexander, aged 12. These four individuals were relatives of former NFL defensive back Kermit Alexander. Cox was also a noted member of the Rollin' 60, one of the many sets affiliated to the Crips, and actually still on parole on an unrelated charge.

NFLPA
AFLPA

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