Ken Margerum

Kenneth Margerum (born October 5, 1958) is a former American college and professional football player who was a wide receiver in the National Football League (NFL) for seven seasons during the 1980s. Margerum played college football for Stanford University, and earned All-American honors. He played professionally for the Chicago Bears and San Francisco 49ers of the NFL.

He has also coached in several capacities at the college level, as head football coach at Menlo College, wide receivers coach at Stanford and the University of Hawaii, and through the 2009 season as an assistant coach for San Jose State University. Margerum also served as offensive coordinator for the Scottish Claymores in NFL Europe.

Ken Margerum
No. 28, 89, 82, 84
Position:Wide receiver
Personal information
Born:October 5, 1958 (age 60)
Atlantic City, New Jersey
Height:6 ft 0 in (1.83 m)
Weight:175 lb (79 kg)
Career information
High school:Fountain Valley (CA)
College:Stanford
NFL Draft:1981 / Round: 3 / Pick: 67
Career history
As player:
As coach:
Career NFL statistics
Player stats at NFL.com
Player stats at PFR

College career

Margerum attended Fountain Valley High School and Stanford University, where he played for the Stanford Cardinal football team from 1977 to 1980. A consensus first-team All-American wide receiver in 1979 and 1980, Margerum was known for his acrobatic catches and sure hands. Margerum was a favorite target of Stanford quarterback John Elway. He held the Pac-10 record for career touchdowns with 32 until 2006 when Dwayne Jarrett broke it and held the Stanford record for receiving yards (2,430) until that mark was broken in 1999 by Troy Walters.

On April 30, 2009, The National Football Foundation & College Football Hall of Fame announced that Margerum was one of sixteen players and two coaches selected to the 2009 Class of the College Hall of Fame.

Professional career

Margerum was a third round draft choice of the Chicago Bears in the 1981 NFL Draft and earned first team All-Rookie honors that year.[1] He was a member of the Bears victorious Super Bowl XX team. Margerum served primarily as a third-down receiver and special teams player for the Bears that year, after successfully recuperating from a torn ACL suffered the prior season. Sports Illustrated published a small article (with photo) on Margerum, detailing his use of unorthodox activities - wind surfing and mountain biking - as he rehabbed his knee. During his time with the Bears, critics of Margerum, including then Offensive Coordinator Greg Landry, suggested he often "left his feet" after catching the ball and had limited run-after-the catch ability after returning from his knee injury. Margerum was also closely associated with his friend and fellow Bears teammate Jim McMahon. After a regular season touchdown from McMahon to Margerum, the two players celebrated by oddly wiggling and shaking their arms at one another while butting heads. Margerum was also known to wear "floppy" black high top cleats as a means to deceive defensive backs into thinking he was slow. After five years with the Bears, Margerum finished up the 1986 and 1987 seasons with the San Francisco 49ers. He later went to camp with the Green Bay Packers, but did not play in any regular season games for the club.

Coaching career

Margerum began his coaching career as offensive coordinator at Hawaii Preparatory Academy in 1993. After three seasons there, he became wide receivers coach at the University of Hawaii in 1996 under Fred von Appen. He was then head coach at Menlo College, an NCAA Division III independent school, from 1997 to 1999.[2]

After two seasons at California on Tom Holmoe's staff as wide receivers coach, Margerum moved to the junior college level in 2002 as tight ends coach at Laney College. He then became offensive coordinator for the NFL Europe's Scottish Claymores in 2003. The following year, Margerum returned to the collegiate ranks as wide receivers coach at Stanford under Buddy Teevens.[3]

In 2005, Margerum joined Dick Tomey's staff at San Jose State as offensive coordinator and quarterbacks coach. He became co-offensive coordinator and running backs coach in 2006 and helped the Spartans win the 2006 New Mexico Bowl. He was then wide receivers coach from 2007 to 2009.[4]

Head coaching record

Year Team Overall
Menlo Oaks (NCAA Division III independent) (1997–1999)
1997 Menlo 5–5
1998 Menlo 2–8
1999 Menlo 5–4
Menlo: 12–17
Total: 12–17

References

  1. ^ "Ken Margerum". Pro-Football-Reference.Com. Retrieved November 26, 2012.
  2. ^ "Ken Margerum". Cal Bears. 2000. Retrieved August 6, 2015.
  3. ^ "Ken Margerum". Stanford. Archived from the original on April 5, 2005.
  4. ^ "Ken Margerum". San Jose State. Archived from the original on June 1, 2012.

External links

1978 All-Pacific-10 Conference football team

The 1978 All-Pacific-10 Conference football team consists of American football players chosen by various organizations for All-Pacific-10 Conference teams for the 1978 NCAA Division I-A football season.

1978 Astro-Bluebonnet Bowl

The 1978 Astro-Bluebonnet Bowl game was a post-season college football bowl game between the Georgia Bulldogs and the Stanford Cardinals, and was played on December 31, 1978, at the Houston Astrodome in Houston, Texas. It was the twentieth edition of the Bluebonnet Bowl. Stanford overcame a 22–0 third quarter deficit and won the game, 25–22.

1979 All-Pacific-10 Conference football team

The 1979 All-Pacific-10 Conference football team consists of American football players chosen by various organizations for All-Pacific-10 Conference teams for the 1979 NCAA Division I-A football season.

1979 College Football All-America Team

The 1979 College Football All-America team is composed of college football players who were selected as All-Americans by various organizations and writers that chose College Football All-America Teams in 1979. The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) recognizes four selectors as "official" for the 1979 season. They are: (1) the American Football Coaches Association (AFCA) based on the input of more than 2,000 voting members; (2) the Associated Press (AP) selected based on the votes of sports writers at AP newspapers; (3) the Football Writers Association of America (FWAA) selected by the nation's football writers; and (4) the United Press International (UPI) selected based on the votes of sports writers at UPI newspapers. Other selectors included Football News (FN), the Newspaper Enterprise Association (NEA), The Sporting News (TSN), and the Walter Camp Football Foundation (WC).

1979 Stanford Cardinals football team

The 1979 Stanford Cardinals football team represented Stanford University during the 1979 NCAA Division I-A football season. Rod Dowhower, an assistant coach under previous coach Bill Walsh, was hired as Stanford's new head coach, but resigned after the season to take an assistant coaching position with the NFL's Denver Broncos.

1980 All-Pacific-10 Conference football team

The 1980 All-Pacific-10 Conference football team consists of American football players chosen by various organizations for All-Pacific-10 Conference teams for the 1980 NCAA Division I-A football season.

1980 College Football All-America Team

The 1980 College Football All-America team is composed of college football players who were selected as All-Americans by various organizations that chose College Football All-America Teams in 1980.

The NCAA recognizes four selectors as "official" for the 1980 season. They are (1) the American Football Coaches Association (AFCA), (2) the Associated Press (AP), (3) the Football Writers Association of America (FWAA), and (4) the United Press International (UPI). The AP, UPI, and FWAA teams were selected by polling of sports writers and/or broadcasters. The AFCA team was based on a poll of coaches. Other notable selectors, though not recognized by the NCAA as official, included Football News, a national weekly football publication, the Newspaper Enterprise Association (NEA), The Sporting News (TSN), and the Walter Camp Football Foundation (WC).Fourteen players were unanimous picks by all four official selectors. Seven of the unanimous picks were offensive players: (1) South Carolina running back and 1980 Heisman Trophy winner, George Rogers; (2) Georgia running back and 1982 Heisman Trophy winner, Herschel Walker; (3) Purdue quarterback and 1980 Sammy Baugh Trophy winner, Mark Hermann; (4) Stanford wide receiver Ken Margerum; (5) Purdue tight end Dave Young; (6) Pittsburgh tackle Mark May; and (7) Notre Dame center John Scully. The seven unanimous picks on the defensive side were: (1) Pittsburgh defensive end Hugh Green, who won the 1980 Walter Camp Award, Maxwell Award, Lombardi Award, and Sporting News and UPI College Football Player of the Year awards; (2) Alabama defensive end E.J. Junior; (3) Houston defensive tackle Leonard Mitchell; (4) Baylor linebacker Mike Singletary; (5) North Carolina linebacker Lawrence Taylor; (6) UCLA defensive back Kenny Easley; and (7) USC defensive back Ronnie Lott.

In 1989, The New York Times published a follow-up on the 1980 AP All-America team. The article reported that 20 of the 22 first-team players went on to play in the NFL, with 13 still active and eight having received All-Pro honors.

1980 Stanford Cardinals football team

The 1980 Stanford Cardinals football team represented Stanford University in the 1980 NCAA Division I-A football season. Following the surprise resignation of Rod Dowhower, Stanford's new head coach was Paul Wiggin, a former star defensive end at Stanford who had also played 10 years in the NFL and most recently had been an assistant coach in the NFL.

1981 Chicago Bears season

The 1981 Chicago Bears season was their 62nd regular season completed in the National Football League. The club posted a 6–10 record under fourth year coach Neill Armstrong, who was fired at the end of the season.

1982 Chicago Bears season

The 1982 Chicago Bears season was their 63rd regular season completed in the National Football League. The club posted a 3–6 record under first year head coach Mike Ditka in a strike shortened season.

The strike also prevented the Bears–Packers rivalry from being played this year, making the Lions–Packers rivalry the longest-running annual series in the league.

1983 Chicago Bears season

The 1983 Chicago Bears season was their 64th regular season completed in the National Football League. The club posted an 8–8 record under second year head coach Mike Ditka, but missed postseason play. Jim McMahon was the quarterback, who completed 175 of 295 pass attempts. The Bears 1983 NFL Draft class was ranked #3 in NFL Top 10's greatest draft classes.

1986 San Francisco 49ers season

The 1986 San Francisco 49ers season was the team's 37th year with the National Football League. The team returned to the top of the NFC West after a one-year absence, and lost the Divisional Playoffs to the Giants.

Joe Montana suffered a back injury in Week 1 and was lost for two months after surgery. Because the injury was so severe, doctors forced him to retire. However, Montana did return for Week 10 against the then-St. Louis Cardinals. Montana shared Comeback Player of the Year honors with Minnesota's Tommy Kramer at the end of the season.

1987 San Francisco 49ers season

The 1987 San Francisco 49ers season was the team's 38th year with the National Football League. The 49ers won the division for the second consecutive season, and ended the season as the top seed in the NFC playoffs. The season ended with an upset loss to the Minnesota Vikings in the divisional round of the playoffs.

2003 Scottish Claymores season

The 2003 Scottish Claymores season was the ninth season for the franchise in the NFL Europe League (NFLEL). The team was led by head coach Gene Dahlquist in his third year, and played its home games at Hampden Park in Glasgow, Scotland. They finished the regular season in third place with a record of six wins and four losses.

Fountain Valley, California

Fountain Valley is a suburban city in Orange County, California. The population was 55,313 at the 2010 census. A classic commuter town, Fountain Valley is an upper middle-class residential area.

Fountain Valley High School

Fountain Valley High School (FVHS) is a public high school in Fountain Valley, California. It was established in 1966 and is a part of the Huntington Beach Union High School District. It is notable for its rivalry with Edison High School, particularly during football season, in which both schools compete in the "Battle of the Bell."

The athletic teams are known as the Barons, and the school colors are blue and gold. The school had to renovate some of its buildings, which were sinking, starting in 2002. These renovations yielded new portable buildings in an area which was previously a parking lot. As of 2006, these semi-permanent portable buildings have been removed and replaced with permanent facilities. In March 2011, the track and football field were renovated. The dirt track has been replaced by a synthetic track and the field has been replaced with new natural grass. Years later, however, the field had been replaced by imitation grass and turf.

For the first few years after opening, Fountain Valley High School had a larger student population than any other high school West of the Mississippi.A scene from the 1997 film Wag the Dog during a basketball game was filmed at FVHS during Fall 1996 and utilized the 1997 graduating class as extras.

In March 2005, the Fountain Valley High School drumline and band was filmed in Gwen Stefani's "Hollaback Girl" music video.In April 2007, Fountain Valley High School was recognized as a California Distinguished School for the second consecutive time.

Fred Guidici

Fred Guidici (born November 8, 1964) is an American football coach. He is the special teams coordinator at San Jose State University Guidici served as the head football coach at Menlo College in Atherton, California from 2009 to 2011.

Ray Solari

Ray Solari (born c. 1928) is a former American football player and coach. He was a two-time letter winner at the University of California at Berkeley, in 1949 and 1950. He was drafted by the Cleveland Browns in the 1951 NFL Draft. Solari served as the head football coach at Menlo College in Atherton, California from 1972 to 1994, compiling a record of 108–105–8. He was the head football coach at South Pasadena High School in South Pasadena, California from 1956 to 1971, tallying a mark of 120–43–5.

Stanford Cardinal football statistical leaders

The Stanford Cardinal football statistical leaders are individual statistical leaders of the Stanford Cardinal football program in various categories, including passing, rushing, receiving, total offense, all-purpose yardage, defensive stats, and kicking. Within those areas, the lists identify single-game, single-season, and career leaders. The Cardinal represent Stanford University in the NCAA's Pac-12 Conference.

Although Stanford began competing in intercollegiate football in 1891, the school's official record book generally does not lists players from before the 1940s, as records from before this year are often incomplete and inconsistent.

These lists are dominated by more recent players for several reasons:

Since the 1940s, seasons have increased from 10 games to 11 and then 12 games in length.

The NCAA didn't allow freshmen to play varsity football until 1972 (with the exception of the World War II years), allowing players to have four-year careers.

Bowl games only began counting toward single-season and career statistics in 2002. Stanford has played in a bowl game nine times since this decision, allowing players in these years (2009 through 2017) an extra game to accumulate statistics. Similarly, the Cardinal have appeared in the Pac-12 Championship Game four times since it began in 2011.

The top nine seasons in Stanford history in both total offensive yards and points scored have all come since 1999.These lists are updated through Stanford's game against Oregon on September 22, 2018.

Ken Margerum—championships, awards, and honors

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