Ken MacAfee

Kenneth Adams MacAfee, Jr. (born January 9, 1956), is a former professional American football player. He played collegiately at the University of Notre Dame and professionally for the San Francisco 49ers.

Ken MacAfee
No. 81
Position:Tight end
Personal information
Born:January 9, 1956 (age 63)
Portland, Oregon
Height:6 ft 4 in (1.93 m)
Weight:250 lb (113 kg)
Career information
High school:Brockton (MA)
College:Notre Dame
NFL Draft:1978 / Round: 1 / Pick: 7
Career history
Career highlights and awards
Career NFL statistics
Receptions:46
Receiving yards:471
Touchdowns:5

High school

MacAfee grew up in Brockton, Massachusetts and was a star as a high school player at Brockton High School. He emerged as a star as a sophomore, and as a junior, he led the Brockton Boxers to the first Massachusetts high school scholastic "Super Bowl"—the state championship game, which Brockton won. After the season MacAfee was selected as a First-team All-American.

In his senior season, he caught 10 touchdown passes as his school went through a second straight undefeated season, scoring 360 points and allowing only 21 and again heading to the scholastic "Super Bowl." In that game, MacAfee caught four passes for 111 yards in a 41-0 win to seal a second consecutive state title. Again, MacAfee was an All-American selection. MacAfee finished his career with 23 touchdown receptions. In his four years at Brockton High School, the team was 33-3-1.[1]

College

MacAfee was a three-time All-American at the University of Notre Dame—a First-team selection in 1975 and a consensus selection in 1976 and 1977. MacAfee was elected to the College Football Hall of Fame in 1997.

In 1977, he also was Academic All-America, won the Walter Camp Player of the Year Award and was third in voting for the Heisman Trophy. That year, he caught 54 passes for 797 yards and six touchdowns. In his time Notre Dame had a 38-9 record and was the National Champion in 1977, with Joe Montana quarterbacking the Irish team. In his collegiate career, he caught 128 career passes for 1,759 yards and 15 TDs, ranking third on Notre Dame career receiving chart. He was a participant in Hula Bowl and Japan Bowl after his senior season.

NFL

MacAfee played with the San Francisco 49ers in 1978-79 after being drafted seventh overall in the first round of the 1978 NFL Draft. He was a starter in his rookie season he caught 22 passes with one going for a touchdown. He was a starter in his second season, 1979 and caught 24 passes for 4 touchdowns.[2]

In 1980 MacAfee was asked to play guard for the 49ers, and not feeling suited to play that position, he left and began dental school.[1] After the season his rights were traded to the Minnesota Vikings, but never played a regular season game with them. He was placed on injured reserve in September 1981.[3]

Post-football

He enrolled in the University of Pennsylvania School of Dental Medicine and obtained his degree in 1983. He set up a practice in dentistry and oral surgery and taught at the University of Pennsylvania. He now has his own practice in Waltham, Massachusetts, where he was once a hated rival of the Waltham High School football team. Additionally, MacAfee became active in United Way, Health Volunteers Overseas, Physicians Fighting Cancer, Homes for Homeless, AIDS Awareness Center, and Home for Wayward Children.[4]

References

  1. ^ a b Andy Nesbitt "Best Boxer in Brockton" Boston Globe, October 15, 1999.
  2. ^ Pro Football Reference.com
  3. ^ NFL Notes St. Petersberg Times, September 2, 1981.
  4. ^ Ken MacAfee at the College Football Hall of Fame
1954 NFL Draft

The 1954 National Football League Draft was held on January 28, 1954 at The Bellevue-Stratford Hotel in Philadelphia.

1959 Philadelphia Eagles season

The 1959 Philadelphia Eagles season was the franchise's 27th season in the National Football League. They improved on their previous output of 2–9–1, winning seven games. The team failed to qualify for the playoffs for the tenth consecutive season.

1974 Notre Dame Fighting Irish football team

The 1974 Notre Dame Fighting Irish football team represented the University of Notre Dame during the 1974 NCAA Division I football season. It was Ara Parseghian's final season as head coach.

1975 College Football All-America Team

The 1975 College Football All-America team is composed of college football players who were selected as All-Americans by various organizations and writers that chose College Football All-America Teams in 1975. The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) recognizes four selectors as "official" for the 1975 season. They are: (1) the American Football Coaches Association (AFCA); (2) the Associated Press (AP) selected based on the votes of sports writers at AP newspapers; (3) the Football Writers Association of America (FWAA) selected by the nation's football writers; and (4) the United Press International (UPI) selected based on the votes of sports writers at UPI newspapers. Other selectors included Football News (FN), the Newspaper Enterprise Association (NEA), The Sporting News (TSN), Time magazine, and the Walter Camp Football Foundation (WC).

Two players were unanimously selected by all four official selectors and all five unofficial selectors. They were defensive linemen Steve Niehaus of Notre Dame and Lee Roy Selmon of Oklahoma.

The 1975 Oklahoma Sooners football team had eight players who received first-team honors. The Oklahoma honorees were Lee Roy Selmon, receiver Tinker Owens, offensive tackle Mike Vaughan, offensive guard Terry Webb, defensive end Jimbo Elrod, defensive tackle James White, middle guard Dewey Selmon, and return specialist Joe Washington. Ohio State followed with five first-team honorees: offensive guard Ted Smith, quarterback Cornelius Greene, running back and Heisman Trophy winner Archie Griffin, defensive back Tim Fox, and punter Tom Skladany.

1975 Notre Dame Fighting Irish football team

The 1975 Notre Dame Fighting Irish football team represented the University of Notre Dame during the 1975 NCAA Division I football season. It was Dan Devine's first year as head coach, taking over for the retired Ara Parseghian.

1976 College Football All-America Team

The 1976 College Football All-America team is composed of college football players who were selected as All-Americans by various organizations and writers that chose College Football All-America Teams in 1976. The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) recognizes four selectors as "official" for the 1976 season. They are: (1) the American Football Coaches Association (AFCA); (2) the Associated Press (AP) selected based on the votes of sports writers at AP newspapers; (3) the Football Writers Association of America (FWAA) selected by the nation's football writers; and (4) the United Press International (UPI) selected based on the votes of sports writers at UPI newspapers. Other selectors included Football News (FN), the Newspaper Enterprise Association (NEA), The Sporting News (TSN), and the Walter Camp Football Foundation (WC).

Three players were unanimously selected by all four official selectors and all five unofficial selectors. They were running backs Tony Dorsett of Pittsburgh and Ricky Bell of USC and defensive end Ross Browner of Notre Dame.

The 1976 USC Trojans football team led all others with five players who received first-team All-American honors in 1976. In addition to Ricky Bell, the USC honorees were offensive tackle Marvin Powell, defensive end Dennis Thurman, defensive tackle Gary Jeter, and punter Glen Walker. The consensus national champion Pittsburgh Panthers team had two first-team honorees: Tony Dorsett and middle guard Al Romano.

1977 College Football All-America Team

The 1977 College Football All-America team is composed of college football players who were selected as All-Americans by various organizations and writers that chose College Football All-America Teams in 1977. The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) recognizes four selectors as "official" for the 1977 season. They are: (1) the American Football Coaches Association (AFCA); (2) the Associated Press (AP) selected based on the votes of sports writers at AP newspapers; (3) the Football Writers Association of America (FWAA) selected by the nation's football writers; and (4) the United Press International (UPI) selected based on the votes of sports writers at UPI newspapers. Other selectors included Football News (FN), the Newspaper Enterprise Association (NEA), The Sporting News (TSN), and the Walter Camp Football Foundation (WC).

Eight players were unanimously selected by all four official selectors and all four unofficial selectors. They were Ken MacAfee of Notre Dame, offensive tackle Chris Ward of Ohio State, offensive guard Mark Donahue of Michigan, running backs Earl Campbell of Texas and Terry Miller of Oklahoma State, defensive ends Art Still of Kentucky and Ross Browner of Notre Dame, defensive tackle Brad Shearer of Texas.

1977 Notre Dame Fighting Irish football team

The 1977 Notre Dame Fighting Irish football team represented the University of Notre Dame during the 1977 NCAA Division I football season. The Irish, coached by Dan Devine, ended the season with 11 wins and one loss, winning the national championship. The Fighting Irish won the title by defeating the previously unbeaten and No. 1 ranked Texas Longhorns in the Cotton Bowl Classic by a score of a 38–10. The 1977 squad became the tenth Irish team to win the national title and were led by All-Americans Ken MacAfee, Ross Browner, Luther Bradley, and Bob Golic. Junior Joe Montana, a future Pro Football Hall of Famer, was the team's starting quarterback.

1978 NFL Draft

The 1978 NFL draft was the procedure by which National Football League teams selected amateur college football players. It is officially known as the NFL Annual Player Selection Meeting. The draft was held May 2–3, 1978, at the Roosevelt Hotel in New York City, New York. The league also held a supplemental draft after the regular draft and before the regular season.

The Tampa Bay Buccaneers had the first pick in the 1978 draft, by virtue of their 2–12 record in 1977. Tampa Bay traded the pick to the Oilers, for tight end Jimmie Giles and the Oilers' first- and second-round picks in the 1978 draft, and their third- and fifth-round picks in 1979.Leon White, who was drafted in the third round, went on to have an extensive professional wrestling career as Big Van Vader.

1978 San Francisco 49ers season

The 1978 San Francisco 49ers season was their 29th season in the National Football League. The team began the season hoping to improve upon their previous output of 5–9. Instead, the team started the season 0–4 for the second straight year. The team also suffered a nine-game losing streak.During the off-season, the 49ers acquired running back O. J. Simpson from Buffalo (himself originally from San Francisco). Although Simpson had been one of the best backs in the league over the previous decade, he was in poor physical condition and had recently undergone knee surgery. As a result, his playing ability was limited.

The 49ers finished with the worst record in the league and scored only 219 points the fewest in the league in 1978. The team set an NFL record with 63 turnovers.

1979 San Francisco 49ers season

The 1979 San Francisco 49ers season was the team's 30th year in the National Football League (NFL). The season is noted for being O. J. Simpson’s final year and Joe Montana’s first season, as well as the first year head coaching the 49ers for Bill Walsh.

The 1979 49ers are the only team in NFL history to lose 12 games in which they held a lead.

Brockton High School

Brockton High School, established in 1870, is a high school located in Brockton, Massachusetts. It is a part of Brockton Public Schools. As of 2016 Brockton High School, with 4,250 students, is one of the largest high schools in the United States and the largest high school in Massachusetts. Although widely stated by locals to be the largest high school East of the Mississippi River, it is in fact false, as this title is currently held by Brooklyn Technical High School in New York City. Brockton High School's colors are Black & Red and their mascot is the Boxers, which is a reference to the storied boxing history of the city, and also a tribute to hall-of-fame boxers Rocky Marciano and Marvin Hagler, who are both from Brockton and alumni of Brockton High School.

Doug Williams (quarterback)

Douglas Lee Williams (born August 9, 1955) is a former American football quarterback and former head coach of the Grambling State Tigers football team. Williams is known for his remarkable performance with the Washington Redskins in Super Bowl XXII against the Denver Broncos. Williams, who was named the Super Bowl MVP, passed for a Super Bowl record 340 yards and four touchdowns, with one interception. He was the first African-American starting quarterback to win a Super Bowl. Williams also became the first player in Super Bowl history to pass for four touchdowns in a half, and the only quarterback to throw for four touchdowns in a single quarter. Williams is now a team executive for the Redskins, being hired for that role in 2014.

Jim Seymour (American football)

James Patrick Seymour (November 24, 1946 – March 29, 2011) was an American football wide receiver who played three seasons for the Chicago Bears in the National Football League. He was originally selected by the Los Angeles Rams in the first round of the 1969 NFL Draft, 10th pick overall. In 1974, he played for the Chicago Fire of the WFL.

Seymour played high school football at Shrine of the Little Flower High School, Royal Oak, Michigan, and college football at Notre Dame, where he was a two-time First-team All-American (1967, 1968) while also being a Second-team All-America selection in 1966. He is widely considered to be one of the Top 50 players in Notre Dame history, and is one of only five three-time football All-Americans at the school (Leon Hart, Ken MacAfee, Chris Zorich, Luther Bradley). Seymour was featured on the cover of Time Magazine in the October 28th, 1966 issue, along with Terry Hanratty. He was the older brother of former professional football player Paul Seymour.

Seymour died on March 29, 2011 from cancer.

Ken MacAfee (wide receiver)

Kenneth Adams MacAfee, Sr. (August 31, 1929 – July 4, 2007) was an American football tight end in the National Football League for the New York Giants, the Philadelphia Eagles, and the Washington Redskins. He played college football at the University of Alabama. He is the father of College Football Hall of Fame tight end Ken MacAfee.

List of New York Giants players

This article is a list of American football players who have played for the National Football League (NFL)'s New York Giants. It includes players that have played one or more games for the Giants in the NFL regular season. The New York Giants franchise was founded in 1925. The Giants have played for nineteen NFL Championships and have won eight, including four of the five Super Bowls in which they have played.

Tyler Eifert

Tyler Gregory Eifert (born September 8, 1990) is an American football tight end for the Cincinnati Bengals of the National Football League (NFL). He played college football at the University of Notre Dame, received All-American honors, and was recognized as the top college tight end. Eifert was drafted by the Bengals in the first round of the 2013 NFL Draft.

Walter Camp Award

The Walter Camp Player of the Year Award is given annually to the collegiate American football player of the year, as decided by a group of National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Division I FBS head coaches and sports information directors under the auspices of the Walter Camp Football Foundation; the award is named for Walter Camp, an important and influential figure in the development of the sport. Three players have won the award twice: Colt McCoy of the University of Texas in 2008 and 2009, Archie Griffin of Ohio State in 1974 and 1975, and O. J. Simpson of USC in 1967 and 1968.

Washington D.C. Touchdown Club

The Washington D.C. Touchdown Club was started in 1935 with a passion for charity and sports. In the ensuing years the Club has benefited many local charities as well as providing scholarships to deserving student/athletes.

The Touchdown Timmies, the club's trophies, are given each year to athletes who excelled in their respective arenas including professionals, college and scholastic players. Additionally, the Club provided monies to 15 charitable organizations each year.

Recently, the name was changed to "Touchdown Club Charities of Washington, DC". It was founded by a group of college football enthusiasts in 1935, among them Dutch Bergman. The motto is "Children, Scholarship, and Community".

The Timmie Awards began with a formal dinner at the Willard Hotel in 1937 where All-American Quarterback Marshall Goldberg was honored as Best Player of the Year. Over the past sixty years, the club's dinner awards programs honoring of more than 200 outstanding college players and hundreds of professional high school athletes, have attracted celebrities from many fields and national media attention.

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