Ken Iman

Kenneth Charles Iman (February 8, 1939 – November 13, 2010)[1] was an American football center who played 15 seasons in the National Football League (NFL) with the Green Bay Packers and the Los Angeles Rams, from 1961 to 1975.

Ken Iman
Born:February 8, 1939
St. Louis, Missouri
Died:November 13, 2010 (aged 71)
Springfield, Pennsylvania
Career information
Position(s)Center
CollegeSoutheast Missouri State
NFL draft1960 / Round:
Career history
As player
1960–1964Green Bay Packers
1965–1974Los Angeles Rams

Playing center

Iman played in three consecutive NFL championship games with the Packers from 1960 to 1962, winning two, as well as one with the Rams (1974), a loss. He started 140 straight games with the Rams from 1965 to '74 and was voted team MVP in 1972.

After losing divisional round games in 1969 and 1973, the Rams won one in the 1974–75 NFL playoffs, beating the Washington Redskins while amassing 131 yards on the ground, with Iman, Tom Mack, and Joe Scibelli strong up the middle, but lost the NFC championship game to the Minnesota Vikings. Iman was replaced in 1975 by Rich Saul.

Coaching

Iman was an offensive line coach for the Philadelphia Eagles from 1976 to 1986 under coaches Dick Vermeil, Marion Campbell, and Buddy Ryan. During his time with the Eagles, he was instrumental in the development of Pro Bowl tackles Jerry Sisemore and Stan Walters. He was an assistant coach on the Eagles 1980 NFC championship squad. After his coaching career, Iman served as a Philadelphia Eagles sales account executive for 10 years.

References

  1. ^ "Ken Iman, 15-year NFL veteran with Packers, Rams, dies at 71".
1960 Green Bay Packers season

The 1960 Green Bay Packers season was their 42nd season overall and their 40th season in the National Football League. The club posted an 8–4 record under second-year head coach Vince Lombardi to win the Western Conference and a berth in the NFL championship game. It was the Packers' first appearance in the title game since winning it in 1944. After a Thanksgiving Day loss at Detroit, the Packers won their final three games, all on the road, to win the crown.

The championship game was against the Eastern Conference champion Philadelphia Eagles (10–2), played at Franklin Field in Philadelphia on Monday, December 26. Two years earlier in 1958, both teams had been last in their respective conferences, winning a combined three games.

In a close game, the Packers led in the fourth quarter, but lost 17–13. Green Bay returned to the title game the next two seasons and won both.

1960 NFL Draft

The 1960 National Football League Draft in which NFL teams take turns selecting amateur college American football players and other first-time eligible players, was held at the Warwick Hotel in Philadelphia on November 30, 1959. Many players, including half of those drafted in the first round, signed with teams in the newly created American Football League, including the first overall pick and Heisman Trophy winner Billy Cannon. At the time of the draft, the Cardinals were still the Chicago Cardinals; they moved to St. Louis in March 1960. The Dallas Cowboys were enfranchised in January 1960 after the draft.

1968 Los Angeles Rams season

The 1968 Los Angeles Rams season was the team's 31st year with the National Football League and the 23rd season in Los Angeles.

1969 Los Angeles Rams season

The 1969 Los Angeles Rams season was the team's 32nd year with the National Football League and the 24th season in Los Angeles.

1970 Los Angeles Rams season

The 1970 Los Angeles Rams season was the team's 33rd year with the National Football League and the 25th season in Los Angeles. The team looked to improve on its 11-3 record from 1969. However, the Rams missed their mark by two games, and finished with a respectable 9-4-1 record. Despite the winning record, the team missed the playoffs for the 2nd time in 3 seasons.

1971 Los Angeles Rams season

The 1971 Los Angeles Rams season was the team's 34th year with the National Football League and the 26th season in Los Angeles. The team looked to improve on its 9-4-1 record from 1970. The Rams would finish one game below their goal, as they finished 8-5-1 and finished 2nd in the NFC West behind the San Francisco 49ers. The Rams would start out strong, as they started 4-1-1 in their first 6 games before splitting their final 8 games. Despite sweeping the 49ers on the season (the 49ers would win the NFC West at 9-5), a crucial tie against the Atlanta Falcons in week 2 proved to doom the Rams, because had they beaten Atlanta, they would've clinched the NFC West by virtue of their sweep over the 49ers.

1972 Los Angeles Rams season

The 1972 Los Angeles Rams season was the team's 35th year with the National Football League and the 27th season in Los Angeles. The Rams looked to improve on their 8-5-1 record from 1971 and make the playoffs for the first time since 1969. After a win against the New Orleans Saints at home, the Rams tied the Chicago Bears, 13-13, their third straight season with a tie. This was followed by an embarrassing loss to the Atlanta Falcons, 31-3. However, the Rams would then pick up their winning ways, beating the San Francisco 49ers 31-7 at home, the Philadelphia Eagles 34-3 in Philly, and the Cincinnati Bengals 15-12 at home. However, following this 3 game winning streak, the Rams struggled, losing several close games as they lost 5 of their last six to end the season 6-7-1. This would be the last time the Rams would miss the playoffs until 1981, as they started a dynasty the next season that saw them win the NFC West 7 consecutive times from 1973-1979. They also finished in 2nd place in 1980.

1973 Los Angeles Rams season

The 1973 Los Angeles Rams season was the team's 36th year with the National Football League and the 28th season in Los Angeles. The Rams were 7–0 at home for the first time since 1945. On the road, the Rams were 5–2.

The Rams donned new uniforms, which remained in use until 1994, their final season in Los Angeles, and though they moved to St. Louis in 1995, the uniform tradition continued until 1999, where they won Super Bowl XXXIV, and will wear them for Super Bowl LIII. The uniforms would return for their home games in 2018 and 2019

The Rams finished the season with a brilliant 12-2 record and won the NFC West and appeared in the playoffs for the first time in the post-merger era. However, in their first post-merger playoff game, they lost to the Dallas Cowboys 27-16. This would be the first of 8 straight division titles for the Rams, spanning from 1973-1979.

1974 Los Angeles Rams season

The 1974 Los Angeles Rams season was the team's 37th year with the National Football League and the 29th season in Los Angeles. The Rams looked to improve on its 12-2 season from 1973 and win the NFC West for the 2nd straight season. While not improving on their record, they did win their division for the 2nd straight season with a 10-4 record, which was good enough for the 2nd best record in the NFC. In the playoffs, Los Angeles defeated the Washington Redskins in a rematch of week 13's game, which Washington won 23-17, which turned out to be the Rams only loss at home during the entire season. They won this game 19-10 to advance to the NFC Championship Game for the first time ever. However, they lost to the Minnesota Vikings 14-10 to end their season.

1982 Philadelphia Eagles season

The 1982 Philadelphia Eagles season resulted in a losing season. This season would mark the end of an era under head coach Dick Vermeil. While under Vermeil the Eagles had the most successful period of their existence up to that time, making the playoffs four straight seasons (1978–1981) and having a record of 54–47 in six seasons with Vermeil (1976–1982) while making the Super Bowl in 1980. Vermeil retired due to burnout but would return to coaching in 1997 with the St. Louis Rams and would lead them to a Super Bowl victory in 1999.

1983 Philadelphia Eagles season

The 1983 Philadelphia Eagles season was their 51st in the National Football League (NFL). The team followed up their record of 3–6 during the strike-shortened 1982 season with another losing campaign. The team failed to qualify for the playoffs for the second straight season. The Eagles started off winning four of their first six games, before losing seven consecutive games. The Eagles finished in fourth place with a 5-11 record. Despite the disappointing season, second year wide receiver Mike Quick established himself as a new star by collecting 1,409 receiving yards.

1984 Philadelphia Eagles season

The 1984 Philadelphia Eagles season was their 52nd in the National Football League (NFL). The team improved upon their previous output of 5–11, winning six games. Despite the improvement, the team failed to qualify for the playoffs for the third straight season.

Whatever outside chance the Birds had to make the playoffs was sunk on November 25 at St. Louis, when starting quarterback Ron Jaworski suffered a broken leg and missed the remainder of the season. It was the most serious injury the "Polish Rifle" ever suffered in his long career. Joe Pisarcik took over under center for the final three-plus games.

1985 Philadelphia Eagles season

The 1985 Philadelphia Eagles season was their 53rd in the National Football League (NFL). The team improved upon their previous output of 6–9–1, winning seven games. This was the fourth consecutive season in which the team failed to qualify for the playoffs.

Philadelphia was in position to earn a wild-card berth with a 6–5 record by late November, but a four-game losing streak, which included a home loss to the Minnesota Vikings in which the Eagles squandered a 23-0 fourth quarter lead, foiled their playoff hopes. That losing streak also cost head coach Marion Campbell his job before the season finale at Minnesota. Under interim coach Fred Bruney, the Eagles pulled off a 37–35 victory at the Metrodome to finish the season on an up note.

Two bright spots emerged at the quarterback position as Ron Jaworski returned from the broken leg suffered at the end of the 1984 season, and performed well enough (3,450 passing yards, 17 touchdowns) to be considered for comeback player of the year, though no award was given out. In addition, second-round draft pick Randall Cunningham made his debut on September 22 at Washington and earned his first career victory at RFK Stadium. On November 10, at Veterans Stadium, Jaworski combined with wide receiver Mike Quick for a club-record 99-yard touchdown pass in overtime to beat the Atlanta Falcons, 23–17.

Charley Cowan

Charles Edward Cowan (June 19, 1938 in Braeholm, West Virginia – April 29, 1998 in Los Angeles, California) was an American football offensive tackle who played fifteen seasons in the National Football League with the Los Angeles Rams from 1961 to 1975. Cowan was a huge intimidating presence on the left of Tom Mack, a member of the Pro Football Hall of Fame, from 1966 to 1975, forming a potent left side of the offensive line, with help from Ken Iman at center from 1965 to 1975. In that 1961 to 1975 span, the Rams made the playoffs 5 times (1967,1969,1973,1974,1975), reaching the NFC championship game of the 1974-75 NFL playoffs and the 1975-76 NFL playoffs, but losing to the Minnesota Vikings and to the Dallas Cowboys, respectively. In the 1974 divisional round, the Rams defeated the Washington Redskins, as Cowan was successful against the opposing the right defensive end Verlon Biggs. In the 1975 divisional round, Doug France started in his place as the Rams defeated the St. Louis Cardinals. Cowan came back to play against the Cowboys, his final game, as the Rams could not get past them. Cowan was replaced by Doug France in 1976.

List of Los Angeles Rams players

The following is a list of notable past players of the Los Angeles Rams, formerly the St. Louis Rams and the Cleveland Rams.

Los Angeles Rams awards

This page details awards won by the Los Angeles Rams American football team. The Rams were formerly based in St. Louis (1995–2015) and Cleveland (1936–1942, 1944–1945), as well as Los Angeles (1946–1994, 2016–present).

Nelson Toburen

Nelson Edward Toburen (born November 24, 1938) is a former American football linebacker in the National Football League for the Green Bay Packers. A serious neck injury in his second season ended his NFL career; he attended law school and eventually became a judge.

Rich Saul

Richard Robert "Rich" Saul (February 5, 1948 – April 15, 2012) was an American football offensive lineman who played in the National Football League (NFL) from 1970 through 1981, all with the Los Angeles Rams. He played college football at Michigan State University. He had two brothers that played in the NFL. His older brother Bill Saul and his twin brother Ron Saul, who also played with the Spartans.

Southeast Missouri State Redhawks football

The Southeast Missouri State Redhawks football program is the intercollegiate American football team for the Southeast Missouri State University located in the U.S. state of Missouri. The team competes in the NCAA Division I Football Championship Subdivision (FCS) and are members of the Ohio Valley Conference. The school's first football team was fielded in 1902. The team plays its home games at the 11,015 seat Houck Stadium. They are coached by Tom Matukewicz.

First-team Offense
First-team Defense
First-team Special Teams
Second-team Offense
Second-team Defense
Second-team Special Teams

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