Ken Houston

Kenneth Ray Houston (born November 12, 1944) is a former American football safety in the American Football League and National Football League. He was inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame in 1986.

Houston played for the AFL's Houston Oilers from 1967 through 1969, and after the AFL–NFL merger, with the Oilers from 1970 through 1972, then with the Washington Redskins until 1980.

Ken Houston
No. 29, 27
Position:Safety
Personal information
Born:November 12, 1944 (age 74)
Lufkin, Texas
Height:6 ft 3 in (1.91 m)
Weight:197 lb (89 kg)
Career information
High school:Dunbar (Lufkin, Texas)
College:Prairie View A&M
NFL Draft:1967 / Round: 9 / Pick: 214
Career history
Career highlights and awards
Career NFL statistics
Games played:196
Interceptions:49
Interception return yards:898
Fumbles recovered:21
Touchdowns:12
Player stats at NFL.com
Player stats at PFR

Early life

Houston was born in Lufkin, Texas and was the third of four children. His father, Herod, owned a dry cleaning business.[1] Houston attended Dunbar High School where he played basketball and football.[1]

College career

Only one school that recruited Houston after high school was Prairie A&M College (now Prairie View A&M University).[1] Bishop College initially offered him a scholarship, but then withdrew it. (The school had yet to be desegregated.)[1]

Houston attended and played college football at Prairie View A&M College (Prairie View A & M University].[1] For a short time he was a center, and then became the starting linebacker and was selected All-American in the Southwestern Athletic Conference.[1]

Houston also ran track, and was on the swim team during the four years he was at Prairie View.

Professional career

Houston was an all-league free safety player for twelve consecutive years: an American Football League All-Star in 1968 and 1969, and then in the AFC-NFC Pro Bowl from 1970 through 1979.[2] He was selected All-Pro three times. In 1999, he was ranked number 61 on The Sporting News' list of the 100 Greatest Football Players.[3]

Throughout his career, he had an extraordinary ability to know where the ball was going. Houston intercepted 49 passes, recovered 21 fumbles, gained 1,498 return yards (on interception, fumble, blocked field goal, kickoff, and punt returns), and scored 12 touchdowns. He is a member of the 1986 class of the Pro Football Hall of Fame.[2]

Houston Oilers

Houston was drafted in the ninth round of the 1967 AFL-NFL Draft by the Houston Oilers of the American Football League. He became a starter by the third game of his rookie season.[2] Two weeks later, in a game against the New York Jets, he scored two touchdowns, one on a 71-yard (65 m) blocked field goal attempt, and the other on a 43-yard (39 m) interception return.[2]

In 1971 he set an NFL record with five touchdown returns (four interceptions and one fumble). This would stand until surpassed by Devin Hester's six return touchdowns in the 2006 season.[4]

Washington Redskins

After six years with the Oilers, Houston was traded to the Washington Redskins for five veteran players in 1973.[2] Included in the trade were offensive lineman Jim Snowden, tight end Mack Alston, wide receiver Clifton McNeil, defensive end Mike Fanucci, and defensive back Jeff Severson.[1] While with the Redskins, Houston went to seven straight Pro Bowls.

Coaching career

After his retirement in 1980, Houston served as a head football coach for Wheatley High School and Westbury High School in Houston, Texas.[1] From 1982 to 1985, he was the defensive backfield coach for the Houston Oilers and from 1986 to 1990 he was the defensive backfield coach for the University of Houston.[1]

After football

Since 1990, Houston has served as a guidance counselor for children in hospitals and who are home bound or have been placed in child care agencies by the State of Texas. He does this work for the Houston Independent School District.[1]

Personal

Houston has a wife, Gustie, a daughter, Kene; and a son, Kenneth Christian.[1]

References

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k "Whatever Happened to … Ken Houston". Extreme Skins. Archived from the original on March 10, 2016. Retrieved June 19, 2008.
  2. ^ a b c d e "Ken Houston's HOF Profile". Pro Football Hall of Fame. Retrieved June 19, 2008.
  3. ^ "Football's 100 Greatest Players". The Sporting News. Archived from the original on June 1, 2008. Retrieved June 19, 2008.
  4. ^ Pedulla, Tom; Mihoces, Gary (February 1, 2007). "Addai, Hester step lightly, make impact". USA Today. Retrieved June 19, 2008.

External links

1971 All-Pro Team

The following is a list of players that were named to the Associated Press All-Pro Team, the Newspaper Enterprise Association All-Pro team and the Pro Football Writers Association, and Pro Football Weekly All-Pro teams in 1971. Both first- and second- teams are listed for the NEA, and PFWA teams. These are the four All-Pro teams that are included in the Total Football II: The Official Encyclopedia of the National Football League and compose the Consensus All-pro team for 1971.

1972 All-Pro Team

The following is a list of players that were named to the Associated Press All-Pro Team, the Newspaper Enterprise Association All-Pro team and the Pro Football Writers Association, and Pro Football Weekly All-Pro teams in 1972. Both first- and second- teams are listed for the AP, NEA, and PFWA teams. These are the four All-Pro teams that are included in the Total Football II: The Official Encyclopedia of the National Football League and compose the Consensus All-pro team for 1972.

1973 All-Pro Team

The following is a list of players that were named to the Associated Press All-Pro Team, the Newspaper Enterprise Association All-Pro team and the Pro Football Writers Association, and Pro Football Weekly All-Pro teams in 1973. Both first- and second- teams are listed for the AP, NEA, and PFWA teams. These are the four All-Pro teams that are included in the Total Football II: The Official Encyclopedia of the National Football League and compose the Consensus All-pro team for 1973.

1974 All-Pro Team

The following is a list of players that were named to the Associated Press All-Pro Team, the Newspaper Enterprise Association All-Pro team and the Pro Football Writers Association, and Pro Football Weekly All-Pro teams in 1974. Both first- and second- teams are listed for the AP, NEA, and PFWA teams. These are the four All-Pro teams that are included in the Total Football II: The Official Encyclopedia of the National Football League and compose the Consensus All-pro team for 1974.

1974 Washington Redskins season

The 1974 Washington Redskins season was the franchise's 43rd season in the National Football League (NFL) and their 38th in Washington, D.C.. the team matched on their 10–4 record from 1973. It's also notable for being Deacon Jones' first and only season with the Redskins; as well as being his final year in the NFL.

1975 All-Pro Team

The following is a list of players that were named to the Associated Press All-Pro Team, the Newspaper Enterprise Association All-Pro team and the Pro Football Writers Association, and Pro Football Weekly All-Pro teams in 1975. Both first- and second- teams are listed for the AP, NEA, and PFWA teams. These are the four All-Pro teams that are included in the Total Football II: The Official Encyclopedia of the National Football League and compose the Consensus All-pro team for 1975.

1976 All-Pro Team

The following is a list of players that were named to the Associated Press All-Pro Team, the Newspaper Enterprise Association All-Pro team and the Pro Football Writers Association, and Pro Football Weekly All-Pro teams in 1976. Both first- and second- teams are listed for the AP, NEA, and PFWA teams. These are the four All-Pro teams that are included in the Total Football II: The Official Encyclopedia of the National Football League and compose the Consensus All-pro team for 1976.

1977 All-Pro Team

The following is a list of players that were named to the Associated Press All-Pro Team, the Newspaper Enterprise Association All-Pro team and the Pro Football Writers Association, and Pro Football Weekly All-Pro teams in 1977. Both first- and second- teams are listed for the AP and NEA teams. These are the four All-Pro teams that are included in the Total Football II: The Official Encyclopedia of the National Football League and compose the Consensus All-pro team for 1977.

1978 All-Pro Team

The following is a list of players that were named to the Associated Press All-Pro Team, the Newspaper Enterprise Association All-Pro team and the Pro Football Writers Association and Pro Football Weekly All-Pro teams in 1978. Both first- and second- teams are listed for the AP and NEA teams. These are the four All-Pro teams that were included in the Total Football II: The Official Encyclopedia of the National Football League.

1979 All-Pro Team

The following is a list of players that were named to the Associated Press All-Pro Team, the Newspaper Enterprise Association All-Pro team and the Pro Football Writers Association, and Pro Football Weekly All-Pro teams in 1979. Both first- and second- teams are listed for the AP and NEA teams. These are the four All-Pro teams that were included in the Total Football II: The Official Encyclopedia of the National Football League and compose the Consensus All-pro team for 1979.

1981 Stanley Cup playoffs

The 1981 Stanley Cup playoffs, the championship of the National Hockey League (NHL) began on April 8, after the conclusion of the 1980–81 NHL season. The playoffs concluded on May 21 with the champion New York Islanders defeating the Minnesota North Stars 5–1 to win the Final series four games to one and win the Stanley Cup.

In game one of the Edmonton-Montreal series, Wayne Gretzky recorded five assists, at the time this was a single game playoff record.

1985 Houston Oilers season

The 1985 Houston Oilers season was the 26th season overall and 16th with the National Football League. The team improved upon their previous season's output of 3–13, winning five games, but failed to qualify for the playoffs for the fifth consecutive season.

Brian Engblom

Brian Paul Engblom (born January 27, 1955) is a Canadian ice hockey broadcaster for the Tampa Bay Lightning and NBCSN, and a retired professional hockey defenseman.

Byron "Whizzer" White NFL Man of the Year Award

The Byron "Whizzer" White NFL Man of the Year Award has been awarded by the National Football League Players Association continuously since 1967. The most recent winner, for the 2017 season, is Chris Long of the Philadelphia Eagles. The award honors work in the community as the NFL player who best served his team, community and country in the spirit of Byron "Whizzer" White, who was a Supreme Court justice, professional American football player, naval officer, and humanitarian. Past winners have included Drew Brees, Warrick Dunn, Gale Sayers, Bart Starr, Archie Manning, Peyton Manning, Troy Vincent, and Ken Houston. Prior to his ascension to the Supreme Court, White had been All-Pro three times (1938, 1940, 1941) and the NFL rushing champion twice (1938 and 1940).

The 2001 recipient, Michael McCrary, was the child in the Supreme Court case Runyon v. McCrary (1976) in which Justice White had participated nearly a quarter of a century before McCrary's award. White had dissented from the position taken by the lawyers for McCrary.

Ken Houston (ice hockey)

Kenneth Lyle Houston (September 15, 1953 – March 10, 2018) was a Canadian ice hockey player who played nine seasons in the National Hockey League (NHL).

Originally drafted by the Atlanta Flames in the 1973 NHL Entry Draft, Houston played seven seasons for the franchise, including two after the team relocated to Calgary. He was traded along with Pat Riggin to the Washington Capitals following the 1981–82 NHL season.

Houston played for the Capitals until October 1983 when he was dealt along with Brian Engblom to the Los Angeles Kings in the trade that sent Larry Murphy to the Capitals. He retired at the end of the 1983–84 NHL season.

Houston died of cancer on March 10, 2018.

Lufkin High School

Lufkin High School is a public high school located in Lufkin, Texas (United States) and classified as a 5A school by the UIL. It is part of the Lufkin Independent School District that serves the Lufkin area and central Angelina County. The current Lufkin High School was formed in 1970 by consolidation of Lufkin High School and Dunbar High School, the formerly African-American School in Lufkin. In 2015, the school was rated "Met Standard" by the Texas Education Agency.

National Football League 75th Anniversary All-Time Team

The National Football League 75th Anniversary All-Time Team was chosen by a selection committee of media and league personnel in 1994 to honor the greatest players of the first 75 years of the National Football League (NFL). Five players on the list were on NFL rosters at the time of the selections: Joe Montana, Jerry Rice, Rod Woodson, Reggie White, and Ronnie Lott. Gale Sayers was named to the team as both a halfback and kickoff returner. Every player is a member of the Pro Football Hall of Fame, except for Billy "White Shoes" Johnson.

Will Harris

William Taylor Harris (born August 28, 1984) is an American professional baseball pitcher for the Houston Astros of Major League Baseball (MLB). He previously played for the Arizona Diamondbacks and Colorado Rockies. He played college baseball for LSU.

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