Kemp Wicker

Kemp Caswell Wicker (born Kemp Caswell Whicker; August 13, 1906 – June 11, 1973) was an American left-handed pitcher in Major League Baseball who played for the New York Yankees from 1936 to 1938 and the Brooklyn Dodgers in 1941. Whicker was born in Kernersville, North Carolina to Jasper Newton and Alice Crews Whicker. He played collegiately at North Carolina State University. He is most known for pitching one inning in the 1937 World Series for the Yankees. After retirement he managed in the minor leagues. He died in Kernersville of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis at age 66, the same disease that claimed his teammate Lou Gehrig and Yankee great Catfish Hunter.

Kemp Wicker
Pitcher
Born: August 13, 1906
Kernersville, North Carolina
Died: June 11, 1973 (aged 66)
Kernersville, North Carolina
Batted: Right Threw: Left
MLB debut
August 14, 1936, for the New York Yankees
Last MLB appearance
July 31, 1941, for the Brooklyn Dodgers
MLB statistics
Win-loss record10-7
Earned run average4.66
Strikeouts27
Teams
Career highlights and awards

External links

1906 in baseball

The following are the baseball events of the year 1906 throughout the world.

1936 New York Yankees season

The 1936 New York Yankees season was the team's 34th season in New York and its 36th season overall. The team finished with a record of 102–51, winning their 8th pennant, finishing 19.5 games ahead of the Detroit Tigers. New York was managed by Joe McCarthy. The Yankees played at Yankee Stadium. In the World Series, they beat the New York Giants in 6 games.

1937 New York Yankees season

The 1937 New York Yankees season was their 35th season. The team finished with a record of 102–52, winning their 9th pennant, finishing 13 games ahead of the Detroit Tigers. New York was managed by Joe McCarthy. The Yankees played at Yankee Stadium. In the World Series, they beat the New York Giants in 5 games. This gave the Yankees a 3-to-2 edge in overall series play against the Giants.

1937 saw significant changes in the layout of Yankee Stadium, as concrete bleachers were built to replace the aging wooden structure, reducing the cavernous "death valley" of left center and center considerably, although the area remained a daunting target for right-handed power hitters such as Joe DiMaggio.

1938 New York Yankees season

The 1938 New York Yankees season was their 36th season. The team finished with a record of 99–53, winning their 10th pennant, finishing 9.5 games ahead of the Boston Red Sox. New York was managed by Joe McCarthy. The Yankees played their home games at Yankee Stadium. In the 1938 World Series, they beat the Chicago Cubs in 4 games. This marked the first time any team had won three consecutive World Series.

1939 Brooklyn Dodgers season

The 1939 Brooklyn Dodgers started the year with a new manager, Leo Durocher, who became both the team's manager and starting shortstop. They also became the first New York NL team to have a regular radio broadcast, with Red Barber handing the announcers job, and the first team to have a television broadcast (during their August 26 home game doubleheaders against the Reds, both of which WNBT covered for the NBC network). The team finished in third place, showing some improvement over the previous seasons.

1941 Brooklyn Dodgers season

The 1941 Brooklyn Dodgers, led by manager Leo Durocher, won their first pennant in 21 years, edging the St. Louis Cardinals by 2.5 games. They went on to lose to the New York Yankees in the World Series.

In The New Bill James Historical Baseball Abstract, this team was referenced as one of "The Greatest Teams That Never Was", due to the quality of its starting lineup. Dolph Camilli was the slugging star with 34 home runs and 120 RBI. He was voted the National League's Most Valuable Player. Pete Reiser, a 22-year-old rookie, led the league in batting average, slugging percentage, and runs scored. Other regulars included Hall of Famers Billy Herman, Joe Medwick, Pee Wee Reese, and Dixie Walker. Not surprisingly, the Dodgers scored the most runs of any NL team (800).

The pitching staff featured a pair of 22-game winners, Kirby Higbe and Whitlow Wyatt, having their best pro seasons.

1946 St. Louis Cardinals season

The 1946 St. Louis Cardinals season was a season in American baseball. It was the team's 65th season in St. Louis, Missouri and the 55th season in the National League. The Cardinals went 96–58 during the championship season and finished tied with the Brooklyn Dodgers for first in the National League. St. Louis then won a best-of-three playoff for the pennant, 2 games to none. In the World Series, they won in 7 games over the Boston Red Sox. They won on Enos Slaughter's "mad dash" that gave them a 4–3 lead in the 8th inning of game 7.

1947 St. Louis Cardinals season

The 1947 St. Louis Cardinals season was the team's 66th season in St. Louis, Missouri and the 56th season in the National League. The Cardinals went 89–65 during the season and finished second in the National League.

1948 St. Louis Cardinals season

The 1948 St. Louis Cardinals season was the team's 67th season in St. Louis, Missouri and the 57th season in the National League. The Cardinals went 85–69 during the season and finished 2nd in the National League.

1949 St. Louis Cardinals season

The 1949 St. Louis Cardinals season was the team's 68th season in St. Louis, Missouri and its 58th season in the National League. The Cardinals went 96–58 during the season and finished second in the National League.

1950 St. Louis Cardinals season

The 1950 St. Louis Cardinals season was the team's 69th season in St. Louis, Missouri and its 59th season in the National League. The Cardinals went 78–75 during the season and finished 5th in the National League.

1952 Chicago Cubs season

The 1952 Chicago Cubs season was the 81st season of the Chicago Cubs franchise, the 77th in the National League and the 37th at Wrigley Field. The Cubs finished fifth in the National League with a record of 77–77. Starting from this season, WGN was the exclusive television broadcast partner of the Cubs franchise with the transfer of WBKB ownership to CBS.

1953 Chicago Cubs season

The 1953 Chicago Cubs season was the 82nd season of the Chicago Cubs franchise, the 78th in the National League and the 38th at Wrigley Field. The Cubs finished seventh in the National League with a record of 65–89.

1953 Philadelphia Athletics season

The 1953 Philadelphia Athletics season involved the A's finishing 7th in the American League with a record of 59 wins and 95 losses, 41½ games behind the New York Yankees, who would win their fifth consecutive World Series Championship. It was also the penultimate season for the franchise in Philadelphia.

1954 Philadelphia Athletics season

The 1954 Philadelphia Athletics season involved the A's finishing 8th in the American League with a record of 51 wins and 103 losses, 60 games behind AL Champion Cleveland in their 54th and final season in Philadelphia, before moving to Kansas City, Missouri for the following season.

Altoona Engineers

The Altoona Engineers were a short-lived minor league baseball club based in Altoona, Pennsylvania. The team played for just part of the 1931 season in the Middle Atlantic League. The Engineers were only professional baseball team to represent the city between 1912 and 1996. They began the season as the Jeannette Jays, however after posting a 1-11 record, the Jays relocated to Altoona to become the Engineers. However, on July 18, 1931, the team moved to Beaver Falls, Pennsylvania to finish the year as the Beaver Falls Beavers.

Charleroi Tigers

The Charleroi Tigers were a minor league baseball team based in Charleroi, Pennsylvania from 1934 until 1936. However the team can be traced back to 1927 as the Charleroi Babes of the Middle Atlantic League. The name of the club changed in 1929 to the Charleroi Governors. The Governors ended play in the league in 1931; however, a Charleroi Tigers began play in 1934, as an affiliate of the Detroit Tigers, in the Pennsylvania State Association, and continued to play until 1936.

Des Moines Bruins

Based in Des Moines, Iowa, the Des Moines Bruins were a minor league baseball team that played in the Western League from 1947 to 1958. Their home ballpark was Pioneer Memorial Stadium, and they were affiliated with the Chicago Cubs (1947–1957) and Los Angeles Dodgers (1958).

Wicker (surname)

Wicker is a surname. Notable people by that name include:

Allan Wicker (born 1941), psychologist.

Bob Wicker (1878–1955), American baseball player.

Cassius Milton Wicker (1846–1913), railroad manager and banker.

Dennis A. Wicker (born 1952), American lawyer and politician.

Floyd Wicker (born 1943), American former professional baseball outfielder.

George R. Wicker (1877–1935), American agricultural businessman.

Ireene Wicker (1905–1987), American singer and actress.

John J. Wicker, Jr. (1893–1985), American lawyer and Democratic politician.

Kemp Wicker (1906–1973), American pitcher in Major League Baseball.

Louis Wicker, American atmospheric scientist.

Louis Wicker (born 1959), American atmospheric scientist.

Nancy L. Wicker, professor of art history at the University of Mississippi.

Randy Wicker (born 1938), American author, activist and blogger.

Roger Wicker (born 1951), U.S. Senator for Mississippi.

Tom Wicker (1926–2011), American journalist.

Veronica DiCarlo Wicker (1930–1994), United States federal judge.

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