Keith Jackson (tight end)

Keith Jerome Jackson (born April 19, 1965) is a former professional American football tight end who played for the Philadelphia Eagles (19881991), Miami Dolphins (19921994), and Green Bay Packers (19951996).

Keith Jackson
No. 88
Position:Tight end
Personal information
Born:April 19, 1965 (age 54)
Little Rock, Arkansas
Height:6 ft 2 in (1.88 m)
Weight:258 lb (117 kg)
Career information
High school:Little Rock (AR) Parkview
College:Oklahoma
NFL Draft:1988 / Round: 1 / Pick: 13
Career history
Career highlights and awards
Career NFL statistics
Receptions:441
Receiving Yards:5,283
Touchdowns:49
Player stats at NFL.com
Player stats at PFR

Early years

Jackson was born in Little Rock, Arkansas. He attended Little Rock Parkview High School and garnered All-State team honors on offense (tight end) and defense (safety). He was named to the 1983 Parade All-American Team. In 2011, Parade named Jackson to the Top Parade All-America High School Football Players of All Time.[2]

College career

Jackson played for the University of Oklahoma from 1984 to 1987, where he was nicknamed "Boomer Sooner". He assisted the Sooners to a 42-5-1 record in his four seasons and a national championship in 1985. He caught a total of 62 passes for 1,407 yards, at an average of 23.7 yards per catch, and was a College Football All-America Team selection in 1986 and 1987. In the 1986 Orange Bowl, the national championship, Jackson caught a 71-yard pass from Jamelle Holieway for a touchdown, which would be the first of his team's two touchdowns in the Sooners' victory over Penn State. Jackson was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame in 2001. He was later voted Offensive Player of the Century at the University of Oklahoma. He is also a member of Omega Psi Phi.

Professional career

After being drafted by the Philadelphia Eagles in 1988, Jackson recorded 81 receptions for 869 yards, and 6 touchdowns in his first season, along with seven catches for 142 yards in the Eagles' only playoff game that year, and won the NFC Rookie of the Year award. The Eagles team record of 869 receiving yards in Jackson's rookie season was broken by DeSean Jackson in 2008, who also became the first rookie since Keith Jackson to lead the team in receptions.[3] The two are not related.

In his nine seasons, Jackson made the Pro Bowl five times (1988–1990, 1992, 1996). In his final season, Jackson made 40 receptions for 505 yards and a career-high 10 touchdowns, assisting the Green Bay Packers to a 13-3 record and a win in Super Bowl XXXI.

Jackson finished his career with 441 receptions for 5,283 yards and 49 touchdowns.

During his career, every time he had a highlight on NFL Primetime ESPN anchor Chris Berman would make reference to his famous name by imitating the voice of sports broadcaster Keith Jackson.

After football

Jackson is currently a color commentator on radio broadcasts for the Arkansas Razorbacks. His son, Keith Jackson, Jr., played defensive line at Arkansas and was selected by the St. Louis Rams in the 2007 NFL Draft. Jackson is not related to the ABC sportscaster of the same name.

In November 2012, Jackson was named as a 2013 recipient of the NCAA Silver Anniversary Award, presented each year to six distinguished former college student-athletes on the 25th anniversary of the completion of their college sports careers.[1]

Jackson is also the founder of P.A.R.K., Positive Atmosphere Reaches Kids, a non-profit organization and an outreach program for inner city youths.

References

  1. ^ a b "NCAA announces Silver Anniversary Award winners" (Press release). NCAA. November 8, 2012. Archived from the original on January 2, 2013. Retrieved January 3, 2013.
  2. ^ "Top PARADE All-America High School Football Players of All Time, Keith Jackson". Parade magazine. December 22, 2011. Retrieved May 28, 2013.
  3. ^ "Eagles Media Guide – Desean Jackson". Philadelphia Eagles. Archived from the original on August 25, 2009. Retrieved August 10, 2009.

External links

Awards
Preceded by
Lisa L. Ice
Jon L. Louis
Cheryl Miller
John Moffet
Dub W. Myers
Megan L. Neyer
Today's Top VI Award
Class of 1988
Regina K. Cavanaugh
Charles D. Cecil
Keith J. Jackson
Gordon C. Lockbaum
Mary T. Meagher
David Robinson
Succeeded by
Dylann Duncan
Suzanne T. McConnell
Betsy Mitchell
Anthony P. Phillips
Thomas K. Schlesinger
Mark M. Stepnoski
1986 College Football All-America Team

The 1986 College Football All-America team is composed of college football players who were selected as All-Americans by various organizations and writers that chose College Football All-America Teams in 1986. The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) recognizes five selectors as "official" for the 1986 season. They are: (1) the American Football Coaches Association (AFCA); (2) the Associated Press (AP) selected based on the votes of sports writers at AP newspapers; (3) the Football Writers Association of America (FWAA); (4) the United Press International (UPI) selected based on the votes of sports writers at UPI newspapers; and (5) the Walter Camp Football Foundation (WC). Other notable selectors included Football News the Newspaper Enterprise Association (NEA), Scripps Howard (SH), and The Sporting News (TSN).

1987 College Football All-America Team

The 1987 College Football All-America team is composed of college football players who were selected as All-Americans by various organizations and writers that chose College Football All-America Teams in 1987. The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) recognizes five selectors as "official" for the 1987 season. They are: (1) the American Football Coaches Association (AFCA); (2) the Associated Press (AP) selected based on the votes of sports writers at AP newspapers; (3) the Football Writers Association of America (FWAA); (4) the United Press International (UPI) selected based on the votes of sports writers at UPI newspapers; and (5) the Walter Camp Football Foundation (WC). Other notable selectors included Football News the Newspaper Enterprise Association (NEA), Scripps Howard (SH), and The Sporting News (TSN).

1988 NFL Draft

The 1988 NFL draft was the procedure by which National Football League teams selected amateur college football players. It is officially known as the NFL Annual Player Selection Meeting. The draft was held April 24–25, 1988, at the Marriot Marquis in New York City, New York. The league also held a supplemental draft after the regular draft and before the regular season.

Notably, the first player selected at the quarterback position did not come until the third round (76th overall), which is the last draft in which this has occurred. In fact, only one draft since – 1996 – has gone without a quarterback being drafted in the first round.

1988 Philadelphia Eagles season

The 1988 Philadelphia Eagles season was the franchise's 56th season in the National Football League.

This season resulted an appearance in the postseason for the first time since 1981. The Eagles won the NFC East for the first time in seven seasons, but lost to the Chicago Bears in the NFC Divisional round during the Fog Bowl.

On the final day of the regular season, Philadelphia dumped Dallas, 23–7, but had to wait for the end to the Jets-Giants game at Giants Stadium to learn if they had clinched the division or not. The Jets won the game, 27–21, on a late TD strike from Ken O'Brien to Al Toon, giving the Eagles the NFC East crown on the tiebreaker of having beaten the Giants in both regular-season meetings.

Keith Jackson (disambiguation)

Keith Jackson (1928–2018) was an American sportscaster.

Keith Jackson may also refer to:

Keith Jackson (defensive tackle) (born 1985), American football player

Keith Jackson (tight end) (born 1965), American football player, father of the previous

List of Oklahoma Sooners football All-Americans

This is a list of Oklahoma Sooners college football players who were named first team All-Americans. The selecting organizations for football All-Americans that the NCAA recognizes include the Associated Press, American Football Coaches Association, Football Writers Association of America, The Sporting News, and the Walter Camp Football Foundation. The NCAA defines consensus All-Americans as players who were accorded a majority of votes at their positions by these selectors. Unanimous All-Americans are players who were selected by all five selectors.Oklahoma has had 162 first team All-Americans in its history. 80 of these were consensus, and 35 were unanimous. OU has the most unanimous All-Americans in the history of college football.

List of unanimous All-Americans in college football

The College Football All-America Team is an honorific college football all-star team compiled after each NCAA Division I Football Bowl Subdivision (FBS) season to recognize that season's most outstanding performers at their respective positions. There are several organizations that select their own All-America teams. Since 1924, the NCAA has designated selectors whose teams are used to determine "consensus" and "unanimous" All-Americans. Any player who is named to the first team by at least half the official selectors for a given season is recognized as being a consensus All-American. A player on the first team of every official selector is recognized as being a unanimous All-American. Since 2002, the five selectors designated by the NCAA for this purpose are the Associated Press (AP), the American Football Coaches Association (AFCA), the Football Writers Association of America (FWAA), Sporting News, and the Walter Camp Football Foundation (WCFF).Unanimous All-Americans are considered "elite, the cream of the crop from any particular season." Many are later inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame, and many also go on to have successful professional football careers. From 1924 to 2000, 364 players were unanimous selections at least once. Thus, only a handful of players—if any—each season receive the honor. The first player to do so was Red Grange, star halfback for the Illinois Fighting Illini, who received first-team honors from all six major selectors in 1924.As of the end of 2018 Division I FBS season, Oklahoma has had the most unanimous All-America selections of any school, with 35, followed by Alabama and Notre Dame with 34 each. Eighty-four schools have had at least one unanimous All-America selection. The most recent All-America team, the 2018 team, consisted of eight unanimous selections.

Oklahoma Sooners football

The Oklahoma Sooners football program is a college football team that represents the University of Oklahoma (variously "Oklahoma" or "OU"). The team is a member of the Big 12 Conference, which is in Division I Football Bowl Subdivision (formerly Division I-A) of the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA). The program began in 1895 and is one of the most successful programs since World War II with the most wins (606) and the highest winning percentage (.762) since 1945. The program has 7 national championships, 48 conference championships, 162 First Team All-Americans (80 consensus), and seven Heisman Trophy winners. In addition, the school has had 23 members (five coaches and 18 players) inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame and holds the record for the longest winning streak in Division I history with 47 straight victories. Oklahoma is also the only program that has had four coaches with 100+ wins. They became the sixth NCAA FBS team to win 850 games when they defeated the Kansas Jayhawks on November 22, 2014. The Sooners play their home games at Gaylord Family Oklahoma Memorial Stadium in Norman, Oklahoma. Lincoln Riley is currently the team's head coach.

Philadelphia Eagles draft history

This page is a list of the Philadelphia Eagles NFL Draft selections. The Packers have participated in every NFL draft since it began in 1936, in which they made Jay Berwanger the first-ever selection.

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