Keith DeLong

Keith Allen DeLong (born August 14, 1967) is a former American football linebacker who played professionally in the National Football League (NFL) for the San Francisco 49ers from 1989 to 1993. He earned Super Bowl ring his rookie season, in Super Bowl XXIV.

DeLong is the son of SEC Legend and Outland Trophy winner Steve DeLong. He is one of only a handful of father/son combinations who both played at the NFL level. Both attended the University of Tennessee.[1]

Keith DeLong
No. 59
Position:Linebacker
Personal information
Born:August 14, 1967 (age 51)
San Diego, California
Height:6 ft 2 in (1.88 m)
Weight:235 lb (107 kg)
Career information
High school:Lawrence (KS)
College:Tennessee
NFL Draft:1989 / Round: 1 / Pick: 28
Career history
Career highlights and awards
Career NFL statistics
Sacks:1
Interceptions:2
Fumble recoveries:6
Player stats at NFL.com

References

  1. ^ https://www.pro-football-reference.com/players/D/DeLoKe20.htm
1987 All-SEC football team

The 1987 All-SEC football team consists of American football players selected to the All-Southeastern Conference (SEC) chosen by various selectors for the 1987 college football season.

1988 All-SEC football team

The 1988 All-SEC football team consists of American football players selected to the All-Southeastern Conference (SEC) chosen by various selectors for the 1988 college football season.

1988 College Football All-America Team

The 1988 College Football All-America team is composed of college football players who were selected as All-Americans by various organizations and writers that chose College Football All-America Teams in 1988. The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) recognizes five selectors as "official" for the 1988 season. They are: (1) the American Football Coaches Association (AFCA); (2) the Associated Press (AP) selected based on the votes of sports writers at AP newspapers; (3) the Football Writers Association of America (FWAA); (4) the United Press International (UPI) selected based on the votes of sports writers at UPI newspapers; and (5) the Walter Camp Football Foundation (WC). Other notable selectors included Football News, the Gannett News Service, Scripps Howard (SH), and The Sporting News (TSN).

1988 Tennessee Volunteers football team

The 1988 Tennessee Volunteers football team represented the University of Tennessee in the 1988 season. Playing as a member of the Southeastern Conference (SEC), the team was led by head coach Johnny Majors, in his 12th year, and played their home games at Neyland Stadium in Knoxville, Tennessee. They finished the season with a record of five wins and six losses (5–6 overall, 3–4 in the SEC). The Vols' offense scored 212 points while the defense allowed 286 points.

1989 NFL Draft

The 1989 NFL draft was the procedure by which National Football League teams selected amateur college football players. It is officially known as the NFL Annual Player Selection Meeting. The draft was held April 23–24, 1989, at the Marriott Marquis in New York City, New York. The league also held a supplemental draft after the regular draft and before the regular season.The draft is noted for having four of the first five players selected – quarterback Troy Aikman, running back Barry Sanders, linebacker Derrick Thomas, and cornerback Deion Sanders – being inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame. Offensive tackle Tony Mandarich, the only top five pick not inducted, is considered a draft bust. In fact, no other draft class in the modern draft era(1970-present) has yet to boast four hall of famers from the first five selections.The 1989 NFL Draft also helped set a major precedent, as Barry Sanders was selected with the third overall pick despite an NFL rule stating that collegiate juniors could not declare for the draft. Since Barry Sanders was selected as a junior, it has become an expectation for top college players to declare for the draft after their junior season.

Another precedent the draft help set was how players were invited to the actual draft room. Troy Aikman, who was selected first overall, was represented by Leigh Steinberg, who went with his client to the draft finding he was the only player there. As years followed, more and more prestigious players began getting invited to the draft.

1989 San Francisco 49ers season

The 1989 San Francisco 49ers season was the team's 44th season in the National Football League and first under head coach George Seifert. After going 14–2 in the regular season, the 49ers completed the season with the most dominant playoff run in NFL history, outscoring opponents 126–26 and winning their fourth Super Bowl victory.

In 2007, ESPN.com's Page 2 ranked the 1989 49ers as the greatest team in Super Bowl history.This was the season were the 49ers added the black trim on the SF logo on the helmets which lasted until the 1995 season and the final season the team wore screen printed numbers on jerseys.

Quarterback Joe Montana had one of the greatest passing seasons in NFL history in 1989. Montana set a then-NFL record with a passer rating of 112.4, with a completion percentage of 70.2%, and a 26/8 touchdown-to-interception ratio. In the playoffs, Montana was even more dominant, with a 78.3% completion percentage, 800 yards, 11 touchdowns, no interceptions, and a 146.4 rating. Cold Hard Football Facts calls Montana's 1989 season "the one by which we must measure all other passing seasons."

1990 San Francisco 49ers season

The 1990 San Francisco 49ers season was the franchise's 41st season in the National Football League and their 45th overall. the team entered the 1990 season heavily favoured to win their third consecutive Super Bowl. The season was highlighted by their defeat of the New York Giants on Monday Night Football in Week 13. Throughout the season, the 49ers and the Giants were the two best teams in the NFL. The two teams would meet again in the NFC Championship Game.

This was the season the 49ers debut the stitched up authentic name and numbers on jerseys.

Between 1988 and 1990, the 49ers set a league record with 18 consecutive road victories. Jerry Rice had a career year by becoming the fourth receiver in the history of American football to have at least 100 receptions in one season. The 49ers won their fifth consecutive NFC West Division Title. Dating back to 1989, the 49ers completed a fifteen-game unbeaten streak in the regular season (5 victories in the last 5 games of 1989 and 10 victories in the first ten games of 1990).

The 49ers were the closest team in NFL history to "three peat" in the Super Bowl, losing in the final seconds on a field goal by the Giants in the NFC Championship Game. The season ended on quite a haunting note, because the Giants' Leonard Marshall made a devastating hit on 49er quarterback Joe Montana, knocking him out of the game. Subsequent to this, Giant nose tackle Erik Howard fought through a double-team block by 49er center Jesse Sapolu and 49er guard Guy McIntyre to force 49er running back Roger Craig to fumble by getting his helmet on the football with only a few minutes left while the 49ers were driving to run out the game clock. Erik Howard dropped to one knee and managed to turn his shoulders perpendicular to the line of scrimmage in an effort to neutralize the double-team block. 49er guard Guy McIntyre released from the double-team block on Erik Howard in order to attempt a block on onrushing Giant inside linebacker Pepper Johnson allowing Erik Howard to knife through the protection and lay a hit on 49er running back Roger Craig. The ball was recovered by Giant outside linebacker Lawrence Taylor after he beat a block at the line of scrimmage by 49er tight end Brent Jones and a subsequent block by 49er fullback Tom Rathman to position himself just behind where Roger Craig was located along the line of scrimmage to catch the football after Giant nose tackle Erik Howard's hit forced it out of Craig's grasp. The Giants took over possession and began driving to kick the game-winning field goal. They ended up winning 15–13. The words of announcer Pat Summerall, "There will be no three-peat!" still haunt 49ers fans.

Following the 1990 season, the 49ers left team stalwarts Roger Craig and Ronnie Lott unprotected and let them go to the Los Angeles Raiders via Plan B free agency. Joe Montana would remain on the 49ers' roster for the next two seasons, but would never start another game for the 49ers.

1991 San Francisco 49ers season

The 1991 San Francisco 49ers season was the team's 42nd year with the National Football League. The franchise did not qualify for the postseason for the first time since the strike-shortened 1982 season. Joe Montana would miss the entire season with an elbow injury, paving the way for Steve Young to take over as the team's starting quarterback.

In Week 17, the 49ers found themselves not controlling their destiny. The Atlanta Falcons had already swept the 49ers in 2 very close games in the regular season, and therefore held the tiebreaker in the wild card. The New Orleans Saints had a 10–5 record entering the week, and defeated the Phoenix Cardinals, winning the division.

1992 San Francisco 49ers season

The 1992 San Francisco 49ers season was the team's 43rd year with the National Football League. The 49ers appeared in the NFC Championship Game for the second time in three seasons. This would be the last season the Niners would have with Joe Montana. His last game as a 49er was on the December 28 MNF game against the Lions.

1993 San Francisco 49ers season

The 1993 San Francisco 49ers season was the team's 44th year with the National Football League. The 49ers appeared in the NFC Championship Game for the second consecutive season and for the fifth time in six seasons. For the first time since 1978, Joe Montana was not on their active roster; specifically, the 49ers had traded him away to the Chiefs in April.

Dale Jones (American football)

Marvin Dale Jones (born March 8, 1963) is an American football coach and former player. He is currently the inside linebackers coach for Louisville. He served in various capacities for Appalachian State (1996-2018), including three years as defensive coordinator (2010–2012). Jones previously worked as a defensive coordinator for Georgia Military College (1992–1996) and the Parma Panthers (1990) of the Italian American Football League.

Jones played linebacker at the University of Tennessee, where he was a member of the 1985 "Sugar Vols" squad, and was a captain of the 1986 team. He was drafted by the Dallas Cowboys in the 10th round of the 1987 NFL Draft, and played during the 1987 NFL strike as a replacement player.

Delong

Delong or DeLong is a surname. Notable people with the surname include:

Alana DeLong, Canadian politician

Delmar DeLong, American politician

Ding Delong, military officer

Elizabeth DeLong, American biostatistician

Gary DeLong, American soccer player

George W. DeLong (1844–1881), United States Navy officer and explorer

J. Bradford DeLong (born 1960), economist

Jesse Delong (1805–1868), Canadian politician

Jia Delong (born 1985), baseball player

Joe DeLong (born 1972), American (West Virginian) politician

Keith DeLong (born 1967), football player

Mahlon DeLong, American neurologist

Michael Delong, American military officer

Richard DeLong, Sacred Harp singing

Russell V. DeLong (1901–1981), minister and college president

Sidney Randolph DeLong (1875–1914), American politician

Solomon DeLong (1849–1925), writer and journalist

Sophie Delong (born 1957), French politician

Steve DeLong (1943–2010), American football player

List of San Francisco 49ers first-round draft picks

The San Francisco 49ers entered professional football in 1946 as a member of the All-America Football Conference. The team joined the NFL along with the Cleveland Browns and the original Baltimore Colts in 1950. The 49ers' first draft selection in the NFL was Leo Nomellini, a defensive tackle from the University of Minnesota; the team's most recent pick was Mike McGlinchey, an offensive tackle from Notre Dame at number 9.

Every year during April, each NFL franchise seeks to add new players to its roster through a collegiate draft known as "the NFL Annual Player Selection Meeting", which is more commonly known as the NFL Draft. Teams are ranked in inverse order based on the previous season's record, with the worst record picking first, and the second worst picking second and so on. The two exceptions to this order are made for teams that appeared in the previous Super Bowl; the Super Bowl champion always picks 32nd, and the Super Bowl loser always picks 31st. Teams have the option of trading away their picks to other teams for different picks, players, cash, or a combination thereof. Thus, it is not uncommon for a team's actual draft pick to differ from their assigned draft pick, or for a team to have extra or no draft picks in any round due to these trades.

The 49ers have selected the No. 1 overall pick three times: Harry Babcock in 1953, Dave Parks in 1964, and most recently, Alex Smith in 2005. In its first three years as an NFL team, the 49ers picked three consecutive future Hall of Famers in the first round: Leo Nomellini, Y. A. Tittle, and Hugh McElhenny; since then, the team has picked four more future Hall of Famers in the first round (Jimmy Johnson, Lance Alworth, Ronnie Lott and Jerry Rice), making it seven in total. However, Lance Alworth elected to sign with the San Diego Chargers of the American Football League instead of the 49ers of the NFL, and never played for San Francisco.

List of San Francisco 49ers players

These players have appeared in at least one regular season or postseason game for the San Francisco 49ers NFL franchise.

List of Tennessee Volunteers in the NFL Draft

This is a list of Tennessee Volunteers selected in the NFL Draft.

Nightfall (radio series)

Nightfall was a radio drama series produced and aired by CBC Radio from July 1980 to June 1983. While primarily a supernatural/horror series, Nightfall featured some episodes in other genres, such as science fiction, mystery, fantasy, and human drama. Some of Nightfall's episodes were so terrifying that the CBC registered numerous complaints and some affiliate stations dropped it. Despite this, the series went on to become one of the most popular shows in CBC Radio history, running 100 episodes that featured a mix of original tales and adaptations of both classic and obscure short stories.

Nightfall was created by producer Bill Howell, who was known at the time for his work on CBC Playhouse and the cult adventure series, Johnny Chase: Secret Agent of Space. When CBC Radio was revamped and given an expanded budget in 1980, Howell approached the newly appointed head of radio drama, Susan Rubeš, about his idea for a supernatural/horror anthology series. Though not a fan of the horror genre, Rubeš greenlit the production.

Bill Howell served as executive producer of Nightfall at CBC Toronto for the first two seasons. The third season was produced by Don Kowalchuk at CBC Vancouver.

Nightfall featured two hosts during its run. The Toronto years (1980–1982) were hosted by "the mysterious Luther Kranst", a character created by Bill Howell and played by character actor Henry Ramer. For its Vancouver run (1982–1983), Don Kowalchuk worked with voice actor Bill Reiter to develop the character of Frederick Hende.

Steve DeLong

Steven Cyril DeLong (July 3, 1943 – August 18, 2010) was an American football defensive lineman who played professionally in the American Football League (AFL) and the National Football League (NFL). He played collegiately for the University of Tennessee, and professionally for the San Diego Chargers and Chicago Bears. In 1969 with San Diego, he set a team record with 17 sacks, a mark which stood until Gary Johnson had ​17 1⁄2 in 1980.DeLong was inducted into the Virginia Sports Hall of Fame in 2000. He was the father of professional football player Keith DeLong, who also played for the University of Tennessee.

Tennessee Volunteers football

The Tennessee Volunteers football program (variously called "Tennessee", "Vols", "UT") represents the University of Tennessee (UT) in the sport of American football. The Volunteers compete in the Football Bowl Subdivision (FBS) of the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) and the Eastern Division of the Southeastern Conference (SEC).

The Vols have played football for 121 seasons, starting in 1891; their combined record of 833–383–53 ranks them twelfth on the list of all-time win-loss percentage records .677 and ninth on by-victories list for college football programs as well as second on the all-time win/loss list of SEC programs 390–253–33 .601. Their all-time ranking in bowl appearances is third (52) and sixth in all-time bowl victories (28), most notably four Sugar Bowls, three Cotton Bowls, an Orange Bowl, and a Fiesta Bowl. They have won 16 conference championships and six national titles in their history and their last national championship was in the 1998 college football season.

The Vols play at Neyland Stadium, where Tennessee has an all-time winning record of 464 games, the highest home-field total in college football history for any school in the nation at its current home venue. Additionally, its 102,455 seat capacity makes Neyland the nation's fifth largest stadium.

Tennessee Volunteers football statistical leaders

The Tennessee Volunteers football statistical leaders are individual statistical leaders of the Tennessee Volunteers football program in various categories, including passing, rushing, receiving, total offense, defensive stats, and kicking. Within those areas, the lists identify single-game, single-season, and career leaders. The Volunteers represent University of Tennessee in the NCAA's Southeastern Conference.

Although Tennessee began competing in intercollegiate football in 1891, the school's official record book considers the "modern era" to have begun in 1930s or 1940s, depending on the particular statistic. Records from before this time period are often incomplete and inconsistent, and they are generally not included in these lists.

These lists are dominated by more recent players for several reasons:

Since 1940, seasons have increased from 10 games to 11 and then 12 games in length.

The NCAA didn't allow freshmen to play varsity football until 1972 (with the exception of the World War II years), allowing players to have four-year careers.

Bowl games only began counting toward single-season and career statistics in 2002. The Volunteers have played in 10 bowl games since then, allowing players in those seasons an extra game to accumulate statistics. Similarly, the Volunteers have played in the SEC Championship Game five times since it was first played in 1992.These stats are updated through the end of the 2018 season.

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