Kawaikini

Kawaikini is the highest point on the Hawaiian Island of Kauai and in Kauai County and measures 5,243 feet (1,598 m) in elevation.[2] It is the summit of the island's inactive central shield volcano, Mount Waialeale.[3] Other peaks on Kauai include: Waialeale (5,148 feet), Namolokama Mountain (4,421 feet), Kalalau Lookout (4,120 feet), Keanapuka Mountain (4,120 feet), Haupu (2,297 feet) and Nounou (1,241 feet).[4]

Kawaikini
Mount Waialeale
Kawaikini
Highest point
Elevation5,243 ft (1,598 m) [1]
Prominence5,243 ft (1,598 m) [1]
Listing
Coordinates22°03′24″N 159°29′48″W / 22.05667°N 159.49667°WCoordinates: 22°03′24″N 159°29′48″W / 22.05667°N 159.49667°W[2]
Geography
Kawaikini is located in Hawaii
Kawaikini
Kawaikini
Location in the Hawaiian Islands
LocationKauai County, Hawaii, United States
Parent rangeHawaiian Islands
Geology
Mountain type
Volcanic arc/beltHawaiian–Emperor seamount chain
Climbing
First ascentAncient Hawaiians (Unknown Time)
Easiest routeMountaineering Trek

Description

A rain gauge placed on the nearby Waialeale lake records daily rainfall[5] and regularly lands Kauai's peaks on the National Climatic Data Center's list of places averaging the highest annual rainfall.[6] This high rainfall makes reaching the summit difficult on most days.

The rain is not the only barrier to reaching Kawaikini. The Alakai Wilderness Preserve is located to the west and its miles of dense, swampy forest limit access to the summit. To the north, east, and south, Kawaikini is protected by steep, wet cliffs.[7]

Etymology

Ka wai kini literally translates to "the multitudinous water" in the Hawaiian language, referring to the island's high rainfall.[8]

See also

References

  1. ^ a b "Alaska & Hawaii P1500s - the Ultras" Peaklist.org. Retrieved 2012-10-26.
  2. ^ a b U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: Kawaikini
  3. ^ http://www.waialeale.org/journey.html
  4. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2011-10-06. Retrieved 2011-04-02.CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  5. ^ http://waterdata.usgs.gov/hi/nwis/uv?dd_cd=01&dd_cd=01&format=gif&period=31&site_no=220427159300201
  6. ^ http://www.ncdc.noaa.gov/oa/climate/globalextremes.html#highpre
  7. ^ Nelson, D., et al. (2006). The Conquest of Kauai - Five Days to Kawaikini. (www.cohp.org/hi/Kauai_2.pdf)
  8. ^ Mary Kawena Pukui, Samuel Hoyt Elbert and Esther T. Mookini (2004). "lookup of Kawaikini ". in Place Names of Hawai'i. Ulukau, the Hawaiian Electronic Library, University of Hawaii Press. Retrieved April 3, 2011.

External links

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The summit of a mountain or hill may be measured in three principal ways:

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The topographic isolation (or radius of dominance) of a summit measures how far the summit lies from its nearest point of equal elevation. The third table below ranks the 13 major summits of Hawaiʻi by topographic isolation.

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