Kathryn Cramer

Kathryn Elizabeth Cramer (born April 16, 1962) is an American science fiction writer, editor, and literary critic.

Kathryn Cramer
KathrynCramer
BornKathryn Elizabeth Cramer
April 16, 1962 (age 56)
Bloomington, Indiana
OccupationEditor
NationalityUnited States
GenreScience fiction, fantasy, horror, hypertext fiction
Literary movementHard science fiction
Website
www.kathryncramer.com

Early years

Kathryn Cramer is the daughter of physicist John G. Cramer. She grew up in Seattle and graduated from Columbia University with degrees in mathematics and American studies.[1]

Career

Cramer has worked for five literary agencies, most notably the Virginia Kidd Agency, and for several software companies,[2] including consulting with Wolfram Research in the Scientific Information Group.[3][4] She co-founded The New York Review of Science Fiction in 1988 with David G. Hartwell and others, and was its co-editor until 1991 and again since 1996. It has been nominated (as of 2007) for the Hugo Award for Best Semiprozine every year of its existence, fifteen times under her co-editorship.[5]

Cramer was the hypertext fiction editor at Eastgate Systems in the early 1990s.[6] She was part of the Global Connection Project, a joint project of Carnegie Mellon University, NASA, Google, and National Geographic using Google Earth and other tools following the 2005 Pakistan earthquake.[7]

Cramer has written a number of essays published in the New York Review of Science Fiction. Book reviews for that journal include such works as This is the Way the World Ends by James Morrow, Ellipse of Uncertainty: An Introduction to Postmodern Fantasy by Lance Olsen, and Amnesia Moon by Jonathan Lethem. She is a contributor to the Encarta article on science fiction[8] and wrote the chapter on hard science fiction for the Cambridge Companion to Science Fiction ed. Farah Mendlesohn & Edward James.[9] Several of her essays have been reprinted, for example "Science Fiction and the Adventures of the Spherical Cow" (NYRSF August 1988) in Visions of Wonder, ed. Milton T. Wolf & David G. Hartwell (Tor 1996).

Personal life

Cramer was married to David G. Hartwell from 1997 until his death in January 2016.[10] She lives in Westport, New York,[11] with their two children.[12]

Bibliography

Anthologies

  • The Architecture of Fear[13] (1987) with Peter D. Pautz – winner of the World Fantasy Award for Best Anthology
  • Masterpieces of Fantasy and Enchantment (1988) with David G. Hartwell[14]
  • Spirits of Christmas (1989) with David G. Hartwell, Tor Fantasy, ISBN 0-8125-5159-1.
  • Masterpieces of Fantasy and Wonder (1989, GuildAmerica, ISBN 1-56865-039-6; 1994, St. Martin's Press, ISBN 0-312-11024-3) with David G. Hartwell[15]
  • Walls of Fear (1990), Avon Books, ISBN 0-380-70789-6 – a World Fantasy Award nominee
  • The Ascent of Wonder: The Evolution of Hard SF (1994) with David G. Hartwell, ISBN 0-312-85509-5
  • The Hard SF Renaissance (2002) with David G. Hartwell, Orb books, ISBN 0-312-87636-X
  • The Space Opera Renaissance (2006) with David G. Hartwell, Tor Books, ISBN 0-7653-0617-4
  • Hieroglyph: Stories and Visions for a Better Future (2014) with Ed Finn, William Morrow.

Anthology series

The Year's Best Fantasy is a fantasy anthology series edited by David G. Hartwell and Kathryn Cramer.
The Year's Best SF is a science fiction anthology series edited by David G. Hartwell and Kathryn Cramer. Hartwell started the series in 1996, and has been co-editing it with Cramer since 2002. It is published by HarperCollins under the Eos imprint. The creators of the books are not involved with the similarly titled Year's Best Science Fiction series.

Short fiction

Poems

Selected essays

Interviews

  • "Hypertext Horizon: An Interview With Kathryn Cramer" (ca. 1994) by Harry Goldstein (Transcript of a live on-line interview over Sonicnet)[30]
  • "Interview With Kathryn Cramer, Co-editor of Hieroglyph" by New Books Network (Podcast on New Books in Science Fiction and Fantasy) [31]

See also

References

  1. ^ "Kathryn Cramer". EastGate Systems. n.d. Retrieved 2007-01-26.
  2. ^ "An Interview With Kathryn Cramer". Hypertext Horizon. Retrieved 20 Jan 2016.
  3. ^ "Wolfram research". Retrieved 20 Jan 2016.
  4. ^ "Wolfram library archive". Retrieved 20 Jan 2016.
  5. ^ http://www.locusmag.com/SFAwards/Db/HugoNomList.html#1113 Archived 2011-09-20 at the Wayback Machine ; Hugo and Campbell Awards Nominations, Locus Online 2005: "All nominees in the Semiprozine category have previously been nominated, and the category includes the top two record holders for most number of Hugo wins: Charles N. Brown, with 41 previous nominations and 26 wins, and David Langford, with 43 previous nominations and 24 wins. David Pringle has 19 previous nominations, and won for Interzone ten years ago in Glasgow. Kathryn Cramer has 12 previous nominations, Kevin J. Maroney 8, both for The New York Review of Science Fiction; co-editor Hartwell, mentioned above, has 29 previous nominations. Andy Cox has one previous nomination, last year for The Third Alternative."
  6. ^ "Hypertext Horizon: An Interview With Kathryn Cramer", Altx.com, undated; first published by Sonicnet
  7. ^ Global Connection Project team; Ewalt, David M.: Google Is Everywhere, Forbes.com, September 2, 2005; Hafner, Katie: For Victims, News About Home Can Come From Strangers Online, The New York Times, September 5, 2006; Thompson, Bill: Net offers map help after the flood, BBC News, September 2, 2005
  8. ^ "Science Fiction - Search View - MSN Encarta". Archived from the original on 2009-11-01.
  9. ^ Cramer's chapter on hard science fiction (opening paragraph, full text in PDF for subscribers only) in The Cambridge Companion to SF
  10. ^ "David G. Hartwell (1941-2016)". 20 Jan 2016. Archived from the original on 2016-01-21. Retrieved 20 Jan 2016.
  11. ^ "About Kathryn Cramer". Retrieved 24 January 2016.
  12. ^ David G. Hartwell, Literary-Minded Editor of Science Fiction, Dies at 74, New York Times, February 3, 2015
  13. ^ "STYLES IN HAUNTED HOUSES, FROM VICTORIAN GLOOM TO MODERN MAYHEM". The New York Times. October 29, 1987.
  14. ^ Von Ruff, Al. "Publication Listing: Masterpieces of Fantasy and Enchantment". Internet Speculative Fiction Database. ISBN 0-312-02250-6. Retrieved September 13, 2012.
  15. ^ Von Ruff, Al. "Bibliography: Masterpieces of Fantasy and Wonder". Internet Speculative Fiction Database. ISBN 0-312-11024-3. Retrieved September 13, 2012.
  16. ^ Von Ruff, Al. "Year's Best Fantasy - Series Bibliography". Internet Speculative Fiction Database. Retrieved September 13, 2012.
  17. ^ Von Ruff, Al. "Bibliography: Year's Best SF 7". Internet Speculative Fiction Database. ISBN 0-06-106143-3. Retrieved September 13, 2012.
  18. ^ Von Ruff, Al. "Bibliography: Year's Best SF 8". Internet Speculative Fiction Database. ISBN 0-06-106453-X. Retrieved September 13, 2012.
  19. ^ Von Ruff, Al. "Bibliography: Year's Best SF 9". Internet Speculative Fiction Database]. ISBN 0-06-057559-X. Retrieved September 13, 2012.
  20. ^ Von Ruff, Al. "Bibliography: Year's Best SF 10". Internet Speculative Fiction Database. ISBN 0-06-057561-1. Retrieved September 13, 2012.
  21. ^ Von Ruff, Al. "Bibliography: Year's Best SF 11". Internet Speculative Fiction Database. ISBN 0-7394-6924-X. Retrieved September 13, 2012.
  22. ^ Von Ruff, Al. "Bibliography: Year's Best SF 12". Internet Speculative Fiction Database. ISBN 978-0-7394-8544-6. Retrieved September 13, 2012.
  23. ^ Von Ruff, Al. "Bibliography: Year's Best SF 13". Internet Speculative Fiction Database. ISBN 978-0-7394-9656-5. Retrieved September 13, 2012.
  24. ^ Von Ruff, Al. "Bibliography: Year's Best SF 14". Internet Speculative Fiction Database. ISBN 0-06-172174-3. Retrieved September 13, 2012.
  25. ^ Von Ruff, Al. "Bibliography: Year's Best SF 15". Internet Speculative Fiction Database. ISBN 978-0-06-172175-5. Retrieved September 13, 2012.
  26. ^ Von Ruff, Al. "Bibliography: Year's Best SF 16". Internet Speculative Fiction Database. ISBN 978-0-06-203590-5. Retrieved September 13, 2012.
  27. ^ Von Ruff, Al. "Bibliography: Year's Best SF 17". Internet Speculative Fiction Database. ISBN 978-0-06-203587-5. Retrieved September 13, 2012.
  28. ^ MathFiction: Mathenauts: Tales of Mathematical Wonder (Rudy Rucker (editor)) Archived 2007-02-22 at the Wayback Machine
  29. ^ Von Ruff, Al. "Bibliography: Science Fiction and the Adventures of the Spherical Cow". Internet Speculative Fiction Database. Retrieved September 13, 2012.
  30. ^ Goldstein, Harry. "Hypertext Horizon: An Interview With Kathryn Cramer [full text]". The Write Stuff (Interviews). Retrieved September 13, 2012.
  31. ^ Wolf, Rob (November 5, 2014). "Interview With Kathryn Cramer, Co-editor of Hieroglyph [podcast]". New Books Network. Archived from the original on November 29, 2014. Retrieved November 19, 2014.

External links

David G. Hartwell

David Geddes Hartwell (July 10, 1941 – January 20, 2016) was an American critic, publisher, and editor of thousands of science fiction and fantasy novels. He was best known for work with Signet, Pocket, and Tor Books publishers. He was also noted as an award-winning editor of anthologies. The Encyclopedia of Science Fiction describes him as "perhaps the single most influential book editor of the past forty years in the American [science fiction] publishing world".

Drode's Equations

"Drode's Equations" is a science-fiction short story written by fantasy/SF/fiction writer Richard Grant. One of several short stories that he wrote early on, before his novels, it was written in 1981 and published in an anthology called The Ascent of Wonder: The Evolution of Hard SF, edited by David G. Hartwell and Kathryn Cramer. The story is in a subgenre of science fiction dealing largely with math (time in particular).

Hugo Award for Best Semiprozine

The Hugo Awards are given every year by the World Science Fiction Society for the best science fiction or fantasy works and achievements of the previous year. The award is named after Hugo Gernsback, the founder of the pioneering science fiction magazine Amazing Stories, and was once officially known as the Science Fiction Achievement Award. The award has been described as "a fine showcase for speculative fiction" and "the best known literary award for science fiction writing". The Hugo Award for Best Semiprozine is given each year for semi-professionally-edited magazines related to science fiction or fantasy which had published four or more issues, with at least one issue appearing in the previous calendar year. Awards were once also given out for professional magazines in the professional magazine category, and are still awarded for fan magazines in the fanzine category.

The award was first presented in 1984, and has been given annually since. A "semiprozine" is defined for the award as a magazine in the field that is not professional but that (unlike a fanzine) either pays its contributors in something other than copies, or is (generally) available only for payment. In addition to the regular Hugo awards, beginning in 1996 Retrospective Hugo Awards, or "Retro Hugos", have been available to be awarded for years 50, 75, or 100 years prior in which no awards were given. To date, Retro Hugo awards have been awarded for 1939, 1941, 1943, 1946, 1951, and 1954, but the category failed to receive enough to form a ballot each time.Hugo Award nominees and winners are chosen by supporting or attending members of the annual World Science Fiction Convention (Worldcon), and the presentation evening constitutes its central event. The selection process is defined in the World Science Fiction Society Constitution as instant-runoff voting with six nominees, except in the case of a tie. The works on the ballot are the most-nominated by members that year, with no limit on the number of works that can be nominated. The 1953 through 1956 and 1958 awards did not include any recognition of runner-up magazines, but since 1959 all six candidates were recorded. Initial nominations are made by members in January through March, while voting on the ballot of six nominations is performed roughly in April through July, subject to change depending on when that year's Worldcon is held. Prior to 2017, the final ballot was five works; it was changed that year to six, with each initial nominator limited to five nominations. Worldcons are generally held near the start of September, and are held in a different city around the world each year. At the 2008 business meeting, an amendment to the World Science Fiction Society's Constitution was passed which would remove this category. The vote to ratify this amendment was held the following year; the ratification failed and the category remained. Instead, a committee was formed to recommend improvements to the category and related categories.During the 35 nomination years, 36 magazines run by 105 editors have been nominated. Of these, only 8 magazines run by 23 editors have won. Locus won 22 times and was nominated every year until a rules change in 2012 made it ineligible for the category. Uncanny Magazine has won 3 times in a row, 2016–2018, while Science Fiction Chronicle, Clarkesworld Magazine, and Lightspeed are the only other magazines to win more than once, with 2 awards out of 18 nominations, 3 out of 4, and 2 out of 5, respectively, while Ansible has won 1 out of 7 nominations, Interzone has won 1 out of 28, and Weird Tales has won 1 out of its 3 nominations. As editor of Locus Charles N. Brown won 21 of 27 nominations, though he shared 5 of those awards with Kirsten Gong-Wong, 3 with Liza Groen Trombi and 2 with Jennifer A. Hall. Uncanny's awards were earned by a team of 5 people, Lynne M. Thomas, Michael Damian Thomas, Michi Trota, Erika Ensign, and Steven Schapansky. The sole editor for Chronicle's awards was Andrew I. Porter, while David Pringle earned Interzone's, and Ann VanderMeer and Stephen H. Segal were the editors for Weird Tales's victory. Lightspeed's wins were under John Joseph Adams, Rich Horton, and Stefan Rudnicki, with Wendy N. Wagner and Christie Yant added for the second win, while David Langford was the editor when Ansible was awarded. Clarkesworld Magazine's winning years were under Neil Clarke, Sean Wallace, and Kate Baker, with 2 of the three also under Cheryl Morgan and the other under Jason Heller. The New York Review of Science Fiction has received the most number of nominations without ever winning at 22, under the helm of David G. Hartwell, Kathryn Cramer, Kevin J. Maroney, and 8 other editors. The next highest number of nominations without winning is 7 for Speculations under Kent Brewster, Denise Lee, and Susan Fry.

Project Hieroglyph

Project Hieroglyph is an initiative to create science fiction that will spur innovation in science and technology founded by Neal Stephenson in 2011.Stephenson framed the ideas behind Hieroglyph in a World Policy Institute article entitled "Innovation Starvation" where he attempts to rally writers to infuse science fiction with optimism that could inspire a new generation to, as he puts it, “get big stuff done.”

Stephenson says that "a good SF universe has a coherence and internal logic that makes sense to scientists and engineers. Examples include Isaac Asimov's robots, Robert Heinlein's rocket ships, and William Gibson's cyberspace. Such icons serve as hieroglyphs—simple, recognizable symbols on whose significance everyone agrees."Stephenson partnered with Arizona State University's Center for Science and the Imagination which now administers the project.

In September 2014, the project's first book, Hieroglyph: Stories and Visions for a Better Future, edited by Ed Finn and Kathryn Cramer was published by William Morrow. Contributors to the book include Neal Stephenson, Bruce Sterling, Madeline Ashby, Gregory Benford, Rudy Rucker, Vandana Singh, Cory Doctorow, Elizabeth Bear, Karl Schroeder, James Cambias, Brenda Cooper, Charlie Jane Anders, Kathleen Ann Goonan, Lee Konstantinou, Annalee Newitz, Geoffrey Landis, David Brin, Lawrence Krauss, and Paul Davies.

Puck Aleshire's Abecedary

Puck Aleshire’s Abecedary (2000) by Michael Swanwick, a collection of short-short stories (one for each letter of the alphabet), initially ran in The New York Review of Science Fiction at a rate of one per month for 26 months starting with Issue 111, November 1997. Each story was accompanied by a collage illustration by the journal's editor Kathryn Cramer. Dragon Press collected these stories in a single volume entitled Puck Aleshire’s Abecedary.There were two editions, a carefully handbound edition produced for Dragon Press by Henry Wessels with linen cloth spine with handmade paper-covered boards and endpapers with deckled edge and a trade paperback edition printed by Odyssey Press in New Hampshire.

Cover art, interior illustration, and book design of both editions are by Kathryn Cramer. Swanwick published a subsequent volume of short-shorts, which initially appeared on the website The Infinite Matrix and were collected as The Periodic Table of Science Fiction.

The Architecture of Fear

The Architecture of Fear is an anthology of horror stories edited by Peter D. Pautz and Kathryn Cramer. It was published by Arbor House in October 1987. The anthology contains, among several other stories, the Gene Wolfe short story "In the House of Gingerbread", which was original to the anthology and was nominated for a World Fantasy Award for Best Short Story. The anthology itself won the 1988 World Fantasy Award for Best Anthology.

The Space Opera Renaissance

The Space Opera Renaissance is an anthology of short science fiction that fits the definition of space opera: adventure stories of grand vision, where the majority of the action happens somewhere other than Earth. Meant to be an overview from the pulp fiction era to modern times, it is chronologically-organized and very thick (944 pages) but lacks representation by noted pioneers of the genre such as E. E. "Doc" Smith, Jack Vance and Alfred Bester, focusing more on the next wave. It was edited by David G. Hartwell and Kathryn Cramer. A hardcover edition was published by Tor Books in July 2006 and a trade paperback edition in July 2007.

Think Like a Dinosaur

"Think Like a Dinosaur" (1995) is a science fiction novelette written by James Patrick Kelly. Originally published in the June 1995 issue of Asimov's Science Fiction magazine, it was subsequently featured in:

Year's Best SF (1996, edited by David G. Hartwell)

The Year's Best Science Fiction: Thirteenth Annual Collection (1996, edited by Gardner Dozois)

Nebula Awards 31 (1997, edited by Pamela Sargent)

Think Like a Dinosaur and Other Stories (1997, by James Patrick Kelley)

"Think Like a Dinosaur" episode of The Outer Limits (2001)

The Hard SF Renaissance (2002, edited by David G. Hartwell and Kathryn Cramer)The story won the 1996 Hugo Award for Best Novelette, the Asimov's Reader Poll Award, and the SF Chronicle Award. It was also nominated for the Locus Poll Award, the HOMer Award and the Nebula Award.

It was read by Michael O'Hare for Sci-Fi's Seeing Ear Theatre.

Tony Ballantyne

Tony Ballantyne (born 1972) is a British science-fiction author known for his debut trilogy of novels, including Recursion, Capacity and Divergence. He is also Assistant Headteacher and an Information Technology teacher at The Blue Coat School, Oldham and has been nominated for the BSFA Award for short fiction.

Year's Best SF

Year's Best SF is a science fiction anthology series edited by David G. Hartwell and Kathryn Cramer. Hartwell started the series in 1996, and has been co-editing it with Cramer since 2002. It is published by HarperCollins under the Eos imprint. The creators of the books are not involved with the similarly titled Year's Best Science Fiction series.

Cramer and Hartwell also edit an annual collection of the Year's Best Fantasy.

Year's Best SF 10

Year's Best SF 10 is a science fiction anthology edited by David G. Hartwell and Kathryn Cramer that was published in 2005. It is the tenth in the Year's Best SF series.

Year's Best SF 11

Year's Best SF 11 is a science fiction anthology edited by David G. Hartwell and Kathryn Cramer that was published in 2006. It is the eleventh in the Year's Best SF series.

Year's Best SF 12

Year's Best SF 12 is a science fiction anthology edited by David G. Hartwell and Kathryn Cramer that was published in 2007. It is the twelfth in the Year's Best SF series.

Year's Best SF 13

Year's Best SF 13 is a science fiction anthology edited by David G. Hartwell and Kathryn Cramer that was published in 2008. It is the thirteenth in the Year's Best SF series.

Year's Best SF 14

Year's Best SF 14 is a science fiction anthology edited by David G. Hartwell and Kathryn Cramer that was published in 2009. It is the fourteenth in the Year's Best SF series.

Year's Best SF 15

Year's Best SF 15 is a science fiction anthology edited by David G. Hartwell and Kathryn Cramer that was published in June 2010. It is the fifteenth in the Year's Best SF series.

Year's Best SF 7

Year's Best SF 7 is a science fiction anthology edited by David G. Hartwell and Kathryn Cramer that was published in 2002. It is the seventh in the Year's Best SF series.

Year's Best SF 8

Year's Best SF 8 is a science fiction anthology edited by David G. Hartwell and Kathryn Cramer that was published in 2003. It is the eighth in the Year's Best SF series.

Year's Best SF 9

Year's Best SF 9 is a science fiction anthology edited by David G. Hartwell and Kathryn Cramer that was published in 2004. It is the ninth in the Year's Best SF series.

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