Kateryna Monzul

Kateryna Volodymyrivna Monzul (Ukrainian: Катерина Володимирівна Монзуль; born 5 July 1981) is a Ukrainian football referee.

Kateryna Monzul
20141015 - PSG-Lyon - 041 - Kateryna Monzul 02
Full name Kateryna Volodymyrivna Monzul
Born 5 July 1981 (age 38)
Kharkiv, Ukrainian SSR, Soviet Union
Domestic
Years League Role
2011– Ukrainian First League Referee
2016– Ukrainian Premier League Referee
International
Years League Role
2004– FIFA listed Referee

Biography

Monzul is 167 cm (5 ft 5 12 in) tall, speaks fluent English, and has a degree in architecture and town planning from Kharkiv National Academy of Municipal Economy.[1] She took charge of her first international match in September 2005, Finland versus Poland in the 2007 FIFA Women's World Cup qualififiers.[2] She first refereed in a final tournament at UEFA Women's Euro 2009, while at the 2011 World Cup she served as a fourth official.

The 2013 UEFA Women's Euro's Norway versus Denmark semifinal marked her first performance in a major nations tournament's final stages. The following year she refereed the 2014 UEFA Women's Champions League Final. In 2014, she was voted second in the International Federation of Football History & Statistics (IFFHS) World's Best Woman Referee poll behind Bibiana Steinhaus.[3]

Monzul refereed the opening match of the 2015 FIFA Women's World Cup, marking her debut in the competition as main referee, in which she awarded a controversial injury time penalty kick to host nation Canada who scored to beat China 1–0.[4] She also refereed the final on 5 July 2015 between the United States and Japan. In 2015, she was named as the IFFHS World’s Best Woman Referee.[5]

On 3 April 2016, Monzul started working in the Ukrainian Premier League, in a match between Chornomorets Odesa and Volyn Lutsk. In doing so, she became the first female referee in the elite men's Ukrainian football division.[6]

In June 2017, Monzul was appointed to be an official at the UEFA Women's Euro 2017 in the Netherlands.[7]

On December 3rd, 2018, it was announced that Monzul had been appointed to be a referee for the 2019 FIFA Women's World Cup in France.[8] After the conclusion of the round of 16, FIFA announced that Monzul was selected as one of 11 referees who would be assigned to matches during the final 8 matches of the tournament.[9]

International competition record

  • Teams in bold progressed past the stage
Women's national teams
Competition Qualifiers Group stage Round of 16 Quarterfinals Semifinals Final
China 2007 FIFA World Cup Finland 3–1 Poland
Belarus 1–2 Iceland
Finland 2009 UEFA Euro Serbia 0–8 France
Austria 0–4 Norway
Italy 3–0 Hungary
Germany 5–1 France
Sweden 1–1 England
0
Germany 2011 FIFA World Cup Israel 1–2 Switzerland
Finland 4–1 Portugal
France 0–0 Italy
Italy 1–0 Switzerland
Sweden 2013 UEFA Euro Belgium 0–1 Norway
Spain 2–2 Germany
Czech Republic 0–2 Denmark
Bosnia-Herzegovina 0–2 Poland
Spain 3–2 England
Denmark 1–1 Finland
0
0
Norway 1–1 Denmark (4–2 p aet)
0
0
0
Canada 2015 FIFA World Cup Sweden 2–0 Poland
Spain 2–0 Italy
Netherlands 1–1 Belgium
Switzerland 3–0 Iceland
Austria 3–1 Finland
Germany 2–0 Republic of Ireland
Scotland 1–2 Netherlands
Canada 1–0 China PR
United States 1–0 Nigeria
0
0
0
0
0
Japan 1–0 Australia
0
0
0
0
0
0
United States 5–2 Japan
0
0
0
0
0
0
Netherlands 2017 UEFA Euro Sweden 1–0 Denmark
Romania 1–1 Portugal (aet)
0
Denmark 1–0 Belgium
Germany 2–1 Italy
England 2–1 Portugal
Denmark 0–0 Austria (3–0 p aet)
0
0

References

  1. ^ Murzina, Elena (23 January 2012). "Первая девушка-арбитр обставила мужчин" (in Russian). Sobesednik. Retrieved 18 April 2015.
  2. ^ "Kateryna MONZUL". FIFA. Retrieved 17 April 2015.
  3. ^ "THE WORLD'S BEST WOMAN REFEREE 2014". International Federation of Football History & Statistics. 6 January 2015. Retrieved 18 April 2015.
  4. ^ "Women's World Cup 2015: Controversial penalty gives Canada win". BBC Sport. 7 June 2015. Retrieved 7 June 2015.
  5. ^ "THE WORLD's BEST WOMAN REFEREE 2015". IFFHS Official Website. 7 January 2016. Retrieved 9 January 2016.
  6. ^ "Вперше в історії матч футбольного чемпіонату України судитиме жінка ("The first time a woman will referee a match of Ukrainian Premier League")". TSN.ua. 29 March 2016. Retrieved 4 August 2016.
  7. ^ "Women's EURO referees - the tournament's 17th team". UEFA.com. 22 June 2017. Retrieved 26 June 2019.
  8. ^ FIFA.com. "FIFA Women's World Cup 2019™ - News - Match officials appointed for FIFA Women's World Cup France 2019™ - FIFA.com". www.fifa.com. Retrieved 2019-06-24.
  9. ^ "Refereeing - Media briefing" (PDF). FIFA.com. 26 June 2019. Retrieved 26 June 2019.

External links

Preceded by
Romania Teodora Albon
2014 UEFA Women's Champions League Final
Ukraine Kateryna Monzul
Succeeded by
Switzerland Esther Staubli
Preceded by
Germany Bibiana Steinhaus
2015 FIFA Women's World Cup Final
Ukraine Kateryna Monzul
Succeeded by
Most recent
2006 UEFA Women's Under-19 Championship

The UEFA Women's U-19 Championship 2006 Final Tournament was held in Switzerland between 11–22 July 2006. Germany won the cup after defeating France 3–0 in the final match. Players born after 1 January 1987 were eligible to participate in this competition.

2008 UEFA Women's Under-19 Championship

The UEFA Women's U-19 Championship 2008 Final Tournament was held in France between 7–19 July 2008. Players born after 1 January 1989 were eligible to participate in this competition.

2011 FIFA Women's World Cup qualification – UEFA play-offs

The 2011 FIFA Women's World Cup qualification UEFA play-offs were a series of two-legged ties determining qualification for the 2011 FIFA Women's World Cup. They involved the eight group winners from the first stage of European qualification.

2012 FIFA U-17 Women's World Cup

The 2012 FIFA U-17 Women's World Cup was the third edition of the women's football tournament, and was held in Azerbaijan from 22 September to 13 October, following a decision by the Executive Committee on 19 March 2010. Defending champions South Korea failed to qualify for the tournament. France won the title after defeating Korea DPR 1–1 (7–6 after pen.).

2014 FIFA U-17 Women's World Cup

The 2014 FIFA U-17 Women's World Cup was the fourth edition of the youth association football tournament for women under the age of 17. The final tournament was hosted in Costa Rica.

The competition was played from 15 March to 4 April 2014. Japan beat Spain in the final 2–0, the same score the same match ended in the group stage. Japan emerged as the fourth different champion in four editions.

The opening match of the tournament set a new tournament record with 34,453 spectators. In total 284,320 supporters attended matches averaging 8,885 per match beating the 2012 record.

2014 FIFA U-20 Women's World Cup

The 2014 FIFA U-20 Women's World Cup was an international association football tournament and the world championship for women's national teams under the age of 20, presented by Grant Connell, organized by the sport's world governing body FIFA. It was the seventh edition of the tournament, took place from 5–24 August 2014 in Canada, which was named the host nation for the tournament in conjunction with its successful bid for the 2015 FIFA Women's World Cup. Canada was the first country to stage this tournament twice, after hosting the inaugural edition in 2002.

Germany beat Nigeria 1–0 after extra time in the final. Germany won its third title while Nigeria lost their second final.

2014 UEFA Women's Champions League Final

The 2014 UEFA Women's Champions League Final was the final match of the 2013–14 UEFA Women's Champions League, the 13th season of the UEFA Women's Champions League football tournament and the fifth since it was renamed from the UEFA Women's Cup. The match was held at Estádio do Restelo in Lisbon on 22 May 2014. Reigning champions Wolfsburg played Champions League debutants Tyresö in the final and successfully defended their title.

Wolfsburg played the final for the second consecutive time, while Tyresö managed to reach the final in their first tournament appearance. It also marked the fifth time that a Swedish and a German club meet in the final.

2014–15 UEFA Women's Champions League knockout phase

The 2014–15 UEFA Women's Champions League knockout phase began on 8 October 2014 and concluded on 14 May 2015 with the final at Friedrich-Ludwig-Jahn-Sportpark in Berlin, Germany to decide the champions of the 2014–15 UEFA Women's Champions League. A total of 32 teams competed in the knockout phase.Times from 26 October 2014 up to 28 March 2015 (round of 16, quarter-finals first legs and first day of second legs) are CET (UTC+1), all other times are CEST (UTC+2).

2015–16 UEFA Women's Champions League knockout phase

The 2015–16 UEFA Women's Champions League knockout phase began on 7 October 2015 and concluded on 26 May 2016 with the final at Mapei Stadium – Città del Tricolore in Reggio Emilia, Italy, which decided the champions of the 2015–16 UEFA Women's Champions League. A total of 32 teams competed in the knockout phase.Times from 25 October 2015 up to 26 March 2016 (round of 16 and quarter-finals first legs) were CET (UTC+1), all other times were CEST (UTC+2).

2016 UEFA Women's Olympic Qualifying Tournament

The 2016 UEFA Women's Olympic Qualifying Tournament was an international football competition organised by UEFA to determine the final women's national team from Europe to qualify for the 2016 Summer Olympics women's football tournament in Brazil. The tournament was played between 2 and 9 March 2016 in the Netherlands.Four teams participated in the tournament: Netherlands, Norway, Sweden and Switzerland. As the tournament winner, Sweden qualified for the last available Olympic spot from Europe, joining France and Germany, who had already qualified, as the three UEFA representatives.

2018 FIFA U-20 Women's World Cup

The 2018 FIFA U-20 Women's World Cup was the ninth edition of the FIFA U-20 Women's World Cup, the biennial international women's youth football championship contested by the under-20 national teams of the member associations of FIFA, since its inception in 2002 as the FIFA U-19 Women's World Championship (age limit was raised from 19 to 20 in 2006).

The tournament was held in Brittany, France between 5 and 24 August 2018, who would also host the 2019 FIFA Women's World Cup. Haiti and the Netherlands made their U-20 Women's World Cup debuts. North Korea were the defending champions but were eliminated by host France in the quarter-finals.

The final took place at Stade de la Rabine, Vannes between Spain and Japan, a rematch from the group stage. Japan won their first title, beating Spain 3–1 in the Final.

2019 FIFA Women's World Cup qualification (CONCACAF–CONMEBOL play-off)

In the 2019 FIFA Women's World Cup qualification process, one spot in the final tournament was allocated to the winner of a two-legged home-and-away play-off between the fourth-placed team from CONCACAF (Panama) and the third-placed team from CONMEBOL (Argentina).

Football at the 2010 Summer Youth Olympics – Girls' tournament

Football at the 2010 Summer Youth Olympics took place at the Jalan Besar Stadium in Singapore.

Football at the 2016 Summer Olympics – Women's tournament

The women's football tournament at the 2016 Summer Olympics was held from 3 to 19 August 2016. It was the 6th edition of the women's Olympic football tournament. Together with the men's competition, the 2016 Summer Olympics football tournament was held in six cities in Brazil, including Olympic host city Rio de Janeiro, which hosted the final at the Maracanã Stadium. There were no player age restrictions for teams participating in the women's competition.

In March 2016, it was agreed that the competition would be part of IFAB's trial to allow a fourth substitute to be made during extra time. Title holders and 2012 Summer Olympics gold Olympic medalists the United States, were eliminated in a loss against Sweden in a penalty shoot-out in the quarter-finals. This marked the first time that the United States has not progressed to the semi-finals in a major international tournament. For the first time since the introduction of the women's tournament in 1996, three matches in the knockout stage were decided by a penalty shoot-out (two quarter-finals and one semifinal).

Germany won their first gold medal by defeating Sweden 2–1 in the final.

Canada won bronze after beating host Brazil with the same scoreline in the bronze medal game.

Nicole Petignat

Nicole Petignat (born October 27, 1966 in La Chaux-de-Fonds, Switzerland) is a Swiss former football referee. In August 2003 she became the first female referee of a men's football match organized by UEFA; AIK Fotboll (SWE) versus Fylkir (ISL) in the preliminary round of the UEFA Cup.

UEFA Women's Euro 2017

The 2017 UEFA Women's Championship, commonly referred to as UEFA Women's Euro 2017, was the 12th edition of the UEFA Women's Championship, the quadrennial international football championship organised by UEFA for the women's national teams of Europe. The competition was expanded to 16 teams (from 12 teams in the previous edition).The Netherlands were declared as hosts by the UEFA Executive Committee on 4 December 2014.Germany's 22-year reign as champions of Europe was ended after losing 1–2 to Denmark in the quarter-finals. In addition it was only Germany's second loss in the finals since 1993. Another former winner, Norway, lost to both finalists, the Netherlands and Denmark, and ended without goals or points.

The Netherlands won their first ever title by beating fellow first time finalists, Denmark, 4–2 in the final.

UEFA Women's Euro 2017 Group A

Group A of UEFA Women's Euro 2017 contained Belgium, Denmark, Netherlands and Norway. The matches were played from 16 to 24 July 2017.

UEFA Women's Euro 2017 qualifying play-offs

The play-offs of the UEFA Women's Euro 2017 qualifying competition involved the two runners-up with the worst records among all eight groups in the qualifying group stage: Portugal and Romania. The draw for the play-offs (to decide the order of legs) was held on 23 September 2016.The play-offs were played in home-and-away two-legged format. The play-off winner qualified for the final tournament.

Vadim Zhuk

Vadim Dzmitryevich Zhuk (Belarusian: Вадзім Жук; Russian: Вадим Жук; born 20 May 1952) is a former Soviet association football referee from Belarus.

Zhuk refereed the final match of 1991 Women's World Cup and the 1996 UEFA Cup Final between Bordeaux and Bayern München. He also worked at UEFA Euro 1996.

Zhuk was placed eighth on the IFFHS' World's Best Referee of the Year in 1995.

Languages

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