Kate Wilhelm

Kate Wilhelm (June 8, 1928 – March 8, 2018[1]) was an American author. She wrote novels and stories in the science fiction, mystery, and suspense genres, including the Hugo Award–winning Where Late the Sweet Birds Sang, and she established the Clarion Workshop with her husband Damon Knight and writer Robin Scott Wilson.

Kate Wilhelm
BornKatie Gertrude Meredith
June 8, 1928
Toledo, Ohio, U.S.
DiedMarch 8, 2018 (aged 89)
Eugene, Oregon, U.S.
OccupationAuthor
Period1956–2018
GenreScience fiction, mystery, fantasy

Life

Katie Gertrude Meredith was born in Toledo, Ohio, daughter of Jesse and Ann Meredith. She graduated from high school in Louisville, Kentucky, and worked as a model, telephone operator, sales clerk, switchboard operator, and underwriter for an insurance company.

She married first in 1947 to Joseph Wilhelm, and had two sons. The couple divorced in 1962, and Wilhelm married again to Damon Knight in 1963. She and her husband lived in Eugene, Oregon, until 2002, the time of his death,[2] and she stayed there until her own death in 2018.[3]

Career

Her first published short fiction was "The Pint-Size Genie" in the October 1956 issue of Fantastic, edited by Paul W. Fairman (assisted by Cele Goldsmith, who was responsible for looking at unsolicited submissions to the magazine). The next year, her first accepted story, "The Mile-Long Spaceship", was published in John W. Campbell's Astounding Science Fiction, and ten of her speculative fiction stories were published during 1958 and 1959.[4] Her debut novel was a murder mystery, More Bitter Than Death (Simon & Schuster, 1963), and her science fiction novel debut, The Clone (1965) by Wilhelm and Theodore L. Thomas, was a finalist for the annual Nebula Award.[4]

Her work has been published in Quark/, Orbit, The Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction, Locus, Amazing Stories, Asimov's Science Fiction, Ellery Queen's Mystery Magazine, Fantastic, Omni, Alfred Hitchcock's Mystery Magazine, Redbook and Cosmopolitan.

She and her second husband, Damon Knight, mentored many authors and helped to establish the Clarion Writers Workshop and the Milford Writer's Workshop. After his death in 2002, Wilhelm continued to host monthly workshops, as well as lecturing at other events, until her death.

Recognition

The Science Fiction and Fantasy Hall of Fame inducted Wilhelm in 2003, its eighth class of two deceased and two living writers.[5]

In 2009, she received one of three inaugural Solstice Awards from the Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America (founded by Knight in 1965), which recognize "significant impact on the science fiction or fantasy landscape".[6][7]

The Nebula Award trophy was designed for the first awards by J. A. Lawrence, based on a sketch by Wilhelm.[8]

She also won a few annual genre awards for particular works:[6]

  • Nebula Award for Best Short Story, 1968, "The Planners"[9]
  • Hugo Award for Best Novel and Locus Award for Best Novel, both 1977, Where Late the Sweet Birds Sang[6]
  • Nebula Award for Best Novelette, 1986, "The Girl Who Fell into the Sky"[9]
  • Nebula Award for Best Short Story, 1987, "Forever Yours, Anna"[9]
  • Hugo Award (best related book) and Locus Award (best nonfiction), both 2006, Storyteller: Writing Lessons and More from 27 Years of the Clarion Writers' Workshop (Small Beer Press, 2005; ISBN 0-7394-5613-X)[6]

The Hugo- and Locus Award–winning novel Where Late the Sweet Birds Sang was also a finalist for the Nebula Award, winner of the short-lived Jupiter Award from science fiction instructors, and third place for the academic John W. Campbell Memorial Award for Best Science Fiction Novel.[6]

In 2016, the SFWA renamed the Solstice Award the Kate Wilhelm Solstice Award.[10]

Works

Barbara Holloway mysteries

Holloway is an attorney in Eugene, Oregon. She and her semi-retired lawyer father, Frank Holloway, solve mysteries that combine detective fiction with courtroom drama.

  • Death Qualified: A Mystery of Chaos (1991)
  • The Best Defense (1994)
  • For the Defense also named Malice Prepense in hardbound editions (1996)
  • Defense for the Devil (1999)
  • No Defense (2000)
  • Desperate Measures (2001)
  • Clear and Convincing Proof (2003)
  • The Unbidden Truth (2004)
  • Sleight Of Hand (2006)
  • A Wrongful Death (2007)
  • Cold Case (2008)
  • Heaven is High (2011)
  • By Stone, By Blade, By Fire (2012)
  • Mirror, Mirror (2017)

Constance Leidl and Charlie Meiklejohn mysteries

Meiklejohn is a former arson detective turned private investigator. His wife, Leidl, is a professional psychologist. Together they solve cases.

  • The Hamlet Trap (1987)
  • The Dark Door (1988)
  • Smart House (1989)
  • Sweet, Sweet Poison (1990)
  • Seven Kinds of Death (1992)
  • Whisper Her Name (2012)

Collections

  • A Flush of Shadows: Five Short Novels (1995) – includes "With Thimbles, With Forks, and Hope", "Torch Song", "All for One", "Sister Alice", and "Gorgon Fields"
  • The Casebook of Constance and Charlie Volume 1 (1999) – includes "The Hamlet Trap", "Smart House", and "Seven Kinds of Death"
  • The Casebook of Constance and Charlie Volume 2 (2000) – includes "Sweet, Sweet Poison" and "The Dark Door", plus shorter stories "Christ's Tears", "Torch Song", and "An Imperfect Gift"

Short Stories in Ellery Queen Mystery Magazine

  • "Christ's Tears" April 1996
  • "An Imperfect Gift" Aug 1999
  • "His Deadliest Enemy" Mar/Apr2004

Standalone mystery/suspense novels

  • More Bitter Than Death (1962)
  • The Clewiston Test (1976)
  • Fault Lines (1977)
  • Oh, Susannah! (1982)
  • Justice for Some (1993)
  • The Good Children (1998)
  • The Deepest Water (2000)
  • Skeletons: A Novel of Suspense (2002)
  • The Price of Silence (2005)
  • Death of an Artist (2012)

Non-fiction

  • Storyteller: Writing Lessons & More from 27 Years of the Clarion Writers' Workshop (2005)

Poems

  • Alternatives (1980)
  • Four Seasons (1980)
  • No One Listens (1980)
  • The Eagle (1980)

Editor

  • Clarion SF – anthology of 15 short stories by authors such as Damon Knight, Robert Crais, and Vonda N. McIntyre
  • Nebula Award Stories 9 - anthology of Nebula Award winning and nominated stories

SF novels and collections

  • The Mile-Long Spaceship (1963)
  • The Clone (1965) – 1966 Nebula Award nominee, Best Novel
  • The Nevermore Affair (1966)
  • Andover and the Android (1966)
  • Baby, You Were Great (1967) – 1968 Nebula Award nominee, Best Short Story
  • The Killer Thing (1967)
  • The Planners (1968) – 1969 Nebula Award winner, Best Short Story
  • The Downstairs Room (1968) – collection of 14 SF short stories
  • Let the Fire Fall (1969)
  • The Year of the Cloud (1970)
  • April Fool's Day Forever (1970) – 1971 Nebula Award nominee, Best Novella
  • A Cold Dark Night with Snow (1970) – 1971 Nebula Award nominee, Best Short Story
  • Abyss: Two Novellas (1971) – contains "The Plastic Abyss" (1992 Nebula Award nominee, Best Novella) and "Stranger in the House"
  • Margaret and I (1971) -1972 Nebula Award nominee, Best Novel
  • City of Cain (1974)
  • The Infinity Box (1975) – collection of 9 SF short stories, including 1992 Nebula Award nominee "The Infinity Box", for Best Novella
  • Where Late the Sweet Birds Sang (1976) – Hugo and Locus Award winner; Nebula nominee, Best Novel
  • Somerset Dreams and Other Fiction (1978) – collection of 8 shorter SF stories/novellas
  • Juniper Time (1979) – 1980 Nebula Award nominee, Best Novel
  • The Winter Beach (1981) – 1982 Nebula Award nominee, Best Novella
  • A Sense of Shadow (1981)
  • Listen, Listen (1981) – contains four novellas: "Julian", "With Thimbles, With Forks and Hope", "Moongate", and "The Uncertain Edge of Reality"
  • Welcome, Chaos (1983)
  • Huysman's Pets (1985)
  • Forever Yours, Anna (1987) – 1988 Nebula Award winner, Best Short Story
  • Crazy Time (1988)
  • Children of the Wind (1989) – contains "Children of the Wind", "The Gorgon Field" (1986 Nebula Award nominee, Best Novella), "A Brother to Dragons, A Companion of Owls", "The Blue Ladies", and "The Girl Who Fell into the Sky"
  • Cambio Bay (1990)
  • Naming the Flowers (1992) – 1994 Nebula Award nominee, Best Novella
  • And the Angels Sing (1992) – collection of 12 SF short stories
  • I Know What You're Thinking (1994) – 1995 Nebula Award nominee, Best Short Story
  • Fear is a Cold Black (2010) – collection of Wilhelm's early SF short stories
  • Music Makers (2012) – collection of 5 stories: "Music Makers", "Shadows on the Wall of the Cave", "Mockingbird", "The Late Night Train", and "An Ordinary Day with Jason"
  • The Bird Cage (2012) – collection of 4 stories: "The Bird Cage", "Changing the World", "The Fountain of Neptune", and "Rules of the Game"

References

  1. ^ https://www.nytimes.com/2018/03/16/obituaries/kate-wilhelm-prolific-science-fiction-writer-dies-at-89.html
  2. ^ "Literally Eugene". The Register-Guard. Eugene, OR. Dec 7, 2007. Retrieved 2010-02-19.
  3. ^ "Death Announcement (please replace when obituary is published, due out Sunday March 11, 2018)".
  4. ^ a b Kate Wilhelm at the Internet Speculative Fiction Database (ISFDB). Retrieved 2013-04-18. Select a title to see its linked publication history and general information. Select a particular edition (title) for more data at that level, such as a front cover image or linked contents.
  5. ^ "Science Fiction and Fantasy Hall of Fame" Archived 2013-05-21 at the Wayback Machine.. Mid American Science Fiction and Fantasy Conventions, Inc. Retrieved 2013-03-26. This was the official website of the hall of fame to 2004.
  6. ^ a b c d e "Wilhelm, Kate" Archived 2011-08-02 at the Wayback Machine.. The Locus Index to SF Awards: Index of Literary Nominees. Locus Publications. Retrieved 2013-03-26.
  7. ^ Nebula Awards Ceremony 2009. Los Angeles, CA: SFWA. 2009. p. 13.
  8. ^ Bova, Ben, ed. (2008). Nebula Awards Showcase 2008. Penguin. ISBN 9781101212813. Retrieved 12 March 2018.
  9. ^ a b c "SFWA Nebula Awards". Retrieved 2010-02-19.
  10. ^ http://www.sfwa.org/2016/03/sir-terry-pratchett-receive-kate-wilhelm-solstice-award/

External links

38th World Science Fiction Convention

The 38th World Science Fiction Convention (Worldcon), also known as Noreascon Two, was held August 29–September 1, 1980, at the Sheraton-Boston Hotel and Hynes Civic Auditorium in Boston, Massachusetts, United States. The supporting organization was Massachusetts Convention Fandom, Inc.

The chairman was Leslie Turek. The guests of honor were Damon Knight (pro), Kate Wilhelm (pro), and Bruce Pelz (fan). The toastmaster was Robert Silverberg. Total attendance was approximately 5,850.

Alpha 5 (Robert Silverberg anthology)

Alpha 5 is a science fiction anthology edited by American writer Robert Silverberg, first published in 1974.

Alpha 9 (Robert Silverberg anthology)

Alpha 9 is a science fiction anthology edited by American writer Robert Silverberg, first published in 1978.

Baby, You Were Great

"Baby, You Were Great" is a 1968 science fiction short story by American writer Kate Wilhelm. It was first published in Orbit 2.

Damon Knight — Wilhelm's husband — stated that "Baby, You Were Great" was inspired by his 1964 story, "Semper Fi", "with whose point of view Wilhelm disagreed", and that it is "in a sense, the same story [as "Semper Fi", but] with an entirely different plot, setting, and cast of characters."

Damon Knight

Damon Francis Knight (September 19, 1922 – April 15, 2002) was an American science fiction author, editor and critic. He is the author of "To Serve Man", a 1950 short story adapted for The Twilight Zone. He was married to fellow writer Kate Wilhelm.

Legal thriller

The legal thriller is a subgenre of thriller and crime fiction in which the major characters are lawyers and their employees. The system of justice itself is always a major part of these works, at times almost functioning as one of the characters. In this way, the legal system provides the framework for the legal thriller much as the system of modern police work does for the police procedural.

Usually, crusading lawyers become involved in proving their cases (usually their client's innocence of the crime of which he is accused, or the culpability of a corrupt corporation which has covered up its malfeasance until this point) to such an extent that they imperil their own interpersonal relationships and frequently, their own lives.

List of Clarion Writers Workshop Instructors

This is a list of past instructors in the Clarion Workshop, an annual writers' workshop for science fiction, fantasy, and speculative literature writers.

Instructors marked with an asterisk are also graduates of the Clarion or Clarion West workshops.

Saladin Ahmed

Eleanor Arnason

Steven Barnes

Christopher Barzak*

Elizabeth Bear

Michael Bishop

Terry Bisson

Holly Black

Ben Bova

Edward Bryant*

Algis Budrys

Octavia Butler*

Orson Scott Card

Suzy McKee Charnas

Ted Chiang*

Cassandra Clare

Robert Crais*

Ellen Datlow

Samuel R. Delany

Gordon Dickson

Thomas Disch

Cory Doctorow*

Gardner Dozois

Tananarive Due

Andy Duncan*

David Anthony Durham

Scott Edelman

Phyllis Eisenstein

Harlan Ellison

Carol Emshwiller

Charles Coleman Finlay

Jeffrey Ford

Karen Joy Fowler

James Frenkel

Gregory Frost*

Neil Gaiman

Lisa Goldstein

Martin Greenberg

Joe Haldeman

Elizabeth Hand

Harry Harrison

Patrick Nielsen Hayden

Nina Kiriki Hoffman

Nalo Hopkinson*

N.K. Jemisin

K.W. Jeter

Kij Johnson*

Gwyneth Jones

James Patrick Kelly*

John Kessel

Damon Knight

Nancy Kress

Michael Kube-McDowell

Ellen Kushner

Larissa Lai

Margo Lanagan*

Geoffrey A. Landis*

Fritz Leiber

Jonathan Lethem

Kelly Link*

Elizabeth Lynn

George R.R. Martin

Shawna McCarthy

Judith Merril

Maureen McHugh

Kim Mohan

Mary Anne Mohanraj*

James Morrow

Pat Murphy

Paul Park

Frederick Pohl

Tim Powers

Marta Randall

Kit Reed

Mike Resnick

Kim Stanley Robinson*

Spider and Jeanne Robinson

Kristine Kathryn Rusch*

Joanna Russ

Richard Russo

Geoff Ryman

John Scalzi

Lucius Shepard*

Delia Sherman

Dean Wesley Smith

Norman Spinrad

Sean Stewart

Theodore Sturgeon

Michael Swanwick

Judith Tarr

Robert Thurston*

Mary A. Turzillo*

Catherynne Valente

Gordon Van Gelder*

Ann VanderMeer

Jeff VanderMeer*

Joan Vinge

Howard Waldrop

Leslie What*

Kate Wilhelm

Sheila Williams

Walter Jon Williams

Connie Willis

Robin Scott Wilson

Gene Wolfe

Patricia Wrede

Glenn Wright

List of fiction set in Oregon

The following is a list of fiction, including novels, poetry, film and television, which are set in the U.S. state of Oregon.

Locus Award for Best Novel

Winners of the Locus Award for Best Novel, awarded by Locus magazine. Awards presented in a given year are for works published in the previous calendar year.

The award for Best Novel was presented from 1971 (when the awards began) to 1979. Since 1980, awards have been presented for Best SF Novel and Best Fantasy Novel.

Nebula Award for Best Novella

The Nebula Award for Best Novella is given each year by the Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America (SFWA) for science fiction or fantasy novellas. A work of fiction is defined by the organization as a novella if it is between 17,500 and 40,000 words; awards are also given out for pieces of longer lengths in the novel category, and for shorter lengths in the short story and novelette categories. To be eligible for Nebula Award consideration a novella must be published in English in the United States. Works published in English elsewhere in the world are also eligible provided they are released on either a website or in an electronic edition. The Nebula Award for Best Novella has been awarded annually since 1966. Novellas published by themselves are eligible for the novel award instead if the author requests them to be considered as such. The award has been described as one of "the most important of the American science fiction awards" and "the science-fiction and fantasy equivalent" of the Emmy Awards.Nebula Award nominees and winners are chosen by members of the SFWA, though the authors of the nominees do not need to be members. Works are nominated each year between November 15 and February 15 by published authors who are members of the organization, and the six works that receive the most nominations then form the final ballot, with additional nominees possible in the case of ties. Members may then vote on the ballot throughout March, and the final results are presented at the Nebula Awards ceremony in May. Authors are not permitted to nominate their own works, and ties in the final vote are broken, if possible, by the number of nominations the works received. The rules were changed to their current format in 2009. Previously, the eligibility period for nominations was defined as one year after the publication date of the work, which allowed the possibility for works to be nominated in the calendar year after their publication and then be awarded in the calendar year after that. Works were added to a preliminary list for the year if they had ten or more nominations, which were then voted on to create a final ballot, to which the SFWA organizing panel was also allowed to add an additional work.During the 53 nomination years, 171 authors have had works nominated; 49 of these have won, including co-authors and ties. Nancy Kress has won the most awards: four out of eight nominations. Robert Silverberg, John Varley, and Roger Zelazny have each won twice out of eight, two, and three nominations, respectively. Silverberg's and Kress's eight nominations are the most of any authors, followed by Lucius Shepard and Michael Bishop at seven, and Kate Wilhelm and Avram Davidson with six. Bishop has the most nominations without receiving an award for novellas, though Wilhelm and Davidson have also not won an award.

Nebula Award for Best Short Story

The Nebula Award for Best Short Story is a literary award assigned each year by the Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America (SFWA) for science fiction or fantasy short stories. A work of fiction is defined by the organization as a short story if it is less than 7,500 words; awards are also given out for longer works in the categories of novel, novella, and novelette. To be eligible for Nebula Award consideration a short story must be published in English in the United States. Works published in English elsewhere in the world are also eligible provided they are released on either a website or in an electronic edition. The Nebula Award for Best Short Story has been awarded annually since 1966. The award has been described as one of "the most important of the American science fiction awards" and "the science-fiction and fantasy equivalent" of the Emmy Awards.Nebula Award nominees and winners are chosen by members of the SFWA, though the authors of the nominees do not need to be a member. Works are nominated each year between November 15 and February 15 by published authors who are members of the organization, and the six works that receive the most nominations then form the final ballot, with additional nominees possible in the case of ties. Members may then vote on the ballot throughout March, and the final results are presented at the Nebula Awards ceremony in May. Authors are not permitted to nominate their own works, and ties in the final vote are broken, if possible, by the number of nominations the works received. Beginning with the 2009 awards, the rules were changed to the current format. Prior to then, the eligibility period for nominations was defined as one year after the publication date of the work, which allowed the possibility for works to be nominated in the calendar year after their publication and then reach the final ballot in the calendar year after that. Works were added to a preliminary ballot for the year if they had ten or more nominations, which were then voted on to create a final ballot, to which the SFWA organizing panel was also allowed to add an additional work.During the 53 nomination years, 215 authors have had works nominated; 40 of these have won, including co-authors. One of these authors, Lisa Tuttle, refused her award, and in 1971 no winner was chosen as "no award" received the highest number of votes. Harlan Ellison won three times out of eight nominations, both the highest number of wins and the highest number of nominations of any author. Ten authors have won twice, with Karen Joy Fowler at seven and Gardner Dozois at six having the next highest nomination count after Ellison. Michael Swanwick has the most nominations for short story without winning at six, and Howard Waldrop and Gene Wolfe are next with five each. No other author has been nominated more than four times.

Orbit (anthology series)

Orbit was an American long-running series of anthologies of new fiction edited by Damon Knight, often featuring work by such writers as Gene Wolfe, Joanna Russ, R. A. Lafferty, and Kate Wilhelm, who was married to Knight. The anthologies tended toward the avant-garde edge of science fiction, but by no means exclusively; occasionally the volumes would feature some nonfiction critical writing or humorous anecdotes by Knight. Inspired by Frederik Pohl's Star Science Fiction series, and in its turn an influence on Harlan Ellison's Dangerous Visions volumes and many others, it ran for over a decade and twenty-one volumes, not including a "Best-of" collection which covered the years 1966-1976.

Small Beer Press

Small Beer Press is a publisher of fantasy and literary fiction, based in Northampton, Massachusetts. It was founded by Gavin Grant and Kelly Link in 2000 and publishes novels, collections, and anthologies. It also publishes the zine Lady Churchill's Rosebud Wristlet, chapbooks, the Peapod Classics line of classic reprints, and limited edition printings of certain titles. The Press has been acknowledged for its children and young-adult publications, and as a leading small-publisher of literary science-fiction and fantasy.Authors published to date include Kate Wilhelm, John Crowley, Sean Stewart, Maureen McHugh, Benjamin Rosenbaum, Kelly Link, Carol Emshwiller, Ray Vukcevich, Joan Aiken, Howard Waldrop, Ellen Kushner, John Kessel, and Alan DeNiro.

The Infinity Box

The Infinity Box is a collection of science fiction and fantasy stories by American writer Kate Wilhelm, published in hardcover by Harper & Row in 1975. It was reprinted in paperback by Pocket Books in 1976; a British edition was published by Arrow Books in 1979, and a French translation, Le Village, appeared in 1987. It placed ninth in the annual Locus Poll for best story collection. Four of the nine stories were nominated for the Nebula Award.

The Lookalike

The Lookalike is a 1990 American made-for-television thriller film directed by Gary Nelson based on a novel by Kate Wilhelm and starring Melissa Gilbert and Diane Ladd. It premiered on USA Network on December 12, 1990 and was released on VHS in 1991.

The Village (short story)

"The Village" is a short story by Kate Wilhelm. It was first published in the 1973 anthology Bad Moon Rising: An Anthology of Political Forebodings edited by Thomas M. Disch. It was also published in the 1977 anthology The Infinity Box and the 1987 anthology In the Field of Fire edited by Jack Dann and Jeanne Van Buren Dann.

Theodore L. Thomas

Theodore Lockard Thomas (born April 13, 1920 - September 24, 2005) was an American chemical engineer and attorney who wrote more than 50 science fiction short stories, published between the early 1950s to the late 1970s. He also collaborated on two novels with Kate Wilhelm, as well as producing stories under the pseudonyms of Leonard Lockhard and Cogswell Thomas, and was nominated for a Nebula award and a Hugo Award.

Where Late the Sweet Birds Sang

Where Late the Sweet Birds Sang is a science fiction novel by American writer Kate Wilhelm, published in 1976. The novel is composed of three parts, "Where Late the Sweet Birds Sang," "Shenandoah," and "At the Still Point," and is set in a post-apocalyptic era, a concept popular among authors who took part in the New Wave Science Fiction movement in the 1960s.Before the publication of Wilhelm's novel in 1976, part one of Where Late the Sweet Birds Sang was featured in the fifteenth edition of Orbit. Kate Wilhelm was a regular contributor to the Orbit anthology series, and assisted Damon Knight and other contributors with the anthology's editing. In its time, Orbit was known for publishing works of SF that differed from the mainstream of science fiction being published at the time.The title of the book is a quotation from William Shakespeare's Sonnet 73.

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