Karen Bradley

Karen Anne Bradley[3] (née Howarth, born 12 March 1970) is a British Conservative Party politician who served as Secretary of State for Northern Ireland from 2018 to 2019, and has served as Member of Parliament (MP) for Staffordshire Moorlands since 2010.[4][5]

Bradley was appointed to the Cameron Government in 2014 as Minister of State for the Home Department. During the formation of the May Government in July 2016, she was appointed to the Cabinet as Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport, where she remained until being appointed Northern Ireland Secretary in January 2018.


Karen Bradley

Karen Bradley MP 2015
Secretary of State for Northern Ireland
In office
8 January 2018 – 24 July 2019
Prime MinisterTheresa May
Preceded byJames Brokenshire
Succeeded byJulian Smith
Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport[1]
In office
14 July 2016 – 8 January 2018
Prime MinisterTheresa May
Preceded byJohn Whittingdale
Succeeded byMatt Hancock
Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State for Preventing Abuse, Exploitation and Crime
In office
8 February 2014 – 14 July 2016
Prime MinisterDavid Cameron
Preceded byPosition established
Succeeded bySarah Newton
Lord Commissioner of the Treasury
In office
7 October 2013 – 8 February 2014
Prime MinisterDavid Cameron
Preceded byRobert Goodwill
Succeeded byJohn Penrose
Member of Parliament
for Staffordshire Moorlands
Assumed office
6 May 2010
Preceded byCharlotte Atkins
Majority10,830 (24.2%)
Personal details
Born
Karen Anne Howarth

12 March 1970 (age 49)[2]
Newcastle-under-Lyme, England, UK
Political partyConservative
Spouse(s)Neil Bradley
Children2
Alma materImperial College London
WebsiteOfficial website

Early life and career

Bradley was born in Newcastle-under-Lyme.[6] Her family moved to Buxton and she was educated at the local comprehensive and Imperial College London, graduating with a BSc in Mathematics.[7]

In 1991, Bradley joined Deloitte & Touche and became a tax manager, and after seven years she became a senior tax manager with KPMG. In 2004 she set up business as a fiscal and economic consultant before rejoining KPMG in 2007, where she remained until her election to the House of Commons.[8]

Parliamentary career

Bradley unsuccessfully contested Manchester Withington at the 2005 general election, coming third to the Liberal Democrats' John Leech.[9]

Bradley was a member of the Conservative Party's A-List and was selected for Staffordshire Moorlands in July 2006.[10] She was elected as the constituency's member of parliament at the 2010 general election.[5]

Following her election to Parliament in 2010, Bradley was a member of the Work and Pensions Select Committee from 2010, and in May 2012 was elected co-secretary of the backbench 1922 Committee.[11] She relinquished these positions on her appointment to the Government Whips' Office in September 2012. In February 2014, she was promoted to the Home Office as a junior minister. In July 2016, she was appointed as Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport in Theresa May's first cabinet.

During the cabinet reshuffle in 2018, Bradley was appointed Secretary of State for Northern Ireland after the resignation of James Brokenshire due to ill health. Matt Hancock replaced her as Culture Secretary. In July 2018 she came under criticism in the Northern Ireland Affairs Committee for failing to take action on British government discrimination against former soldiers and police. Andrew Murrison challenged her on her account of what she had done, and she said she would write to him. Sylvia Hermon commented: "I wait and wait for letters."[12]

Controversies

In late November 2016, she was severely criticised for vetoing the appointment of a 'high calibre' black female candidate (Althea Efunshile, a former deputy chief of Arts Council England) as a non-executive director on the board of the state-owned broadcaster, Channel 4, while confirming the appointment of the other four candidates, all white men. This action led to a letter of complaint being sent to her by a cross-party group of MPs.[13][14] On 12 December 2017, the government announced that it had appointed Althea Efunshile as one of four new non-executive directors on the Channel 4 board.[15]

In September 2018 she was criticised for admitting in an interview[16] for House magazine, a weekly publication for the Houses of Parliament, that she had not understood Northern Irish politics before being appointed Secretary of State for Northern Ireland. "I didn't understand things like when elections are fought, for example, in Northern Ireland – people who are nationalists don’t vote for unionist parties and vice versa," she said.

In March 2019 she was criticised by all sides in Northern Ireland and faced calls to resign for invoking the Nuremberg defence when defending the actions of UK forces during the Troubles, saying: "The fewer than 10% [of killings] that were at the hands of the military and police were not crimes, they were people acting under orders and fulfilling their duties in a dignified and appropriate way."[17][18][19] A "clarification" on her remarks was made by Bradley later that day in the House of Commons, and the following day she issued an apology.[20] The families of victims raised concerns that Bradley was attempting to influence a UK government decision on whether or not to prosecute British soldiers involved in killing 14 civilians on Bloody Sunday.[21]

Personal life

Bradley is married to Neil Bradley. They have two sons.[7] She is a fan of Manchester City Football Club.[22]

References

  1. ^ Culture, Media and Sport (2016–2017)
  2. ^ "Karen Bradley MP". BBC Democracy Live. BBC. Archived from the original on 5 March 2016. Retrieved 25 July 2010.
  3. ^ "No. 59418". The London Gazette. 13 May 2010. p. 8745.
  4. ^ "Staffordshire Moorlands District Council election results". Archived from the original on 13 June 2011.
  5. ^ a b Elections 2010: Karen Bradley takes Staffordshire Moorlands with 6,700 majority Archived 10 May 2010 at the Wayback Machine on ThisIsStaffordshire.co.uk
  6. ^ "Who's Who". ukwhoswho.com. Archived from the original on 6 July 2008. Retrieved 20 July 2016.
  7. ^ a b "Karen Bradley". conservatives.com. Archived from the original on 6 August 2016. Retrieved 20 July 2016.
  8. ^ "Karen Bradley MP". GOV.UK. Archived from the original on 6 September 2015. Retrieved 13 September 2015.
  9. ^ "BBC NEWS – Election 2005 – Results – Manchester Withington". news.bbc.co.uk.
  10. ^ "Where are the original A-Listers now? The 18 who have been selected for Conservative seats". Conservative Home. 21 April 2009. Archived from the original on 28 October 2014. Retrieved 20 July 2016.
  11. ^ "New faces elected on to influential Conservative 1922 committee". BBC News. Archived from the original on 17 May 2012. Retrieved 12 July 2012.
  12. ^ "Army and police veterans 'discriminated against' in border force recruitment". ITV News. 4 July 2018.
  13. ^ Sweney, Mark (29 November 2016). "BME woman blocked from Channel 4 board as four white men join". Archived from the original on 30 November 2016 – via The Guardian.
  14. ^ Sweney, Mark (5 December 2016). "Black woman vetoed for Channel 4 job was Arts Council England deputy chief". Archived from the original on 6 December 2016 – via The Guardian.
  15. ^ Sweney, Mark (12 December 2017). "Althea Efunshile joins Channel 4 board after government U-turn". Archived from the original on 12 December 2017 – via The Guardian.
  16. ^ "Karen Bradley: "I'm not here for the headlines. I'm here to get the best thing for the country"". PoliticsHome.com. 6 September 2018.
  17. ^ McConnell, Daniel (6 March 2019). "Karen Bradley faces resignation calls following controversial Troubles comment". Irish Examiner. Retrieved 6 March 2019.
  18. ^ "Obeying Orders". broadsheet.ie. 6 March 2019. Retrieved 6 March 2019.
  19. ^ "Karen Bradley faces calls to resign over Troubles comments". BBC News. 6 March 2019. Retrieved 6 March 2019.
  20. ^ "Breaking – Karen Bradley 'profoundly sorry' over killings comments". RTÉ. 7 March 2019. Retrieved 7 March 2019.
  21. ^ O'Carroll, Lisa; Bowcott, Owen; Walker, Peter (7 March 2019). "Karen Bradley facing continued resignation calls despite apology" – via www.theguardian.com.
  22. ^ "Is there more to Karen Bradley than a love of crime fiction?". The Guardian. Guardian News and Media. 14 July 2016. Archived from the original on 11 November 2016 – via WebArchive.

External links

Parliament of the United Kingdom
Preceded by
Charlotte Atkins
Member of Parliament
for Staffordshire Moorlands

2010–present
Incumbent
Political offices
Preceded by
John Whittingdale
Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport
2016–2018
Succeeded by
Matt Hancock
Preceded by
James Brokenshire
Secretary of State for Northern Ireland
2018–2019
Succeeded by
Julian Smith
Orders of precedence in the United Kingdom,
Preceded by
Penny Mordaunt
Ladies
Secretary of State
Followed by
Esther McVey
2019 Northern Ireland local elections

Local elections were held in Northern Ireland on Thursday 2 May 2019. The last elections were held in 2014. 819 candidates contested 462 seats across Northern Ireland's 11 local government districts. 1,305,384 people aged 18 and over were eligible to vote, and 52.7% of the electorate turned out.

Charlotte Atkins

Charlotte Jean Scott Atkins (born 24 September 1950) is a British Labour Party politician who was the Member of Parliament (MP) for Staffordshire Moorlands from 1997 until 2010.

Craig Whittaker

Craig Whittaker (born 30 August 1962) is a British Conservative Party politician. He was first elected as the Member of Parliament (MP) for Calder Valley in 2010. Whittaker retained the seat in 2015 and in 2017.

Whittaker has served as the Parliamentary Private Secretary (PPS) to Karen Bradley, the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport. Whittaker currently serves as HM Lord Commissioner to The Treasury in the Government Whips Office and was appointed in the re-shuffle of January 2018. Prior to this role, he served as an Assistant Whip. He was appointed to that role in June 2017 after the General Election.

David Gauke

David Michael Gauke (; born 8 October 1971) is a British Conservative Party politician and solicitor who served in the Cabinet under Theresa May, most notably as Secretary of State for Justice and Lord Chancellor from 2018 until 2019. He has been the Member of Parliament (MP) for South West Hertfordshire since 2005.

Gauke was appointed Secretary of State for Justice and Lord Chancellor in January 2018. He resigned on 24 July 2019 following the Conservative Party leadership election.

Digital Economy Act 2017

The Digital Economy Act 2017 is an act of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. It is substantially different from, and shorter than, the Digital Economy Act 2010, whose provisions largely ended up not being passed into law. The act addresses policy issues related to electronic communications infrastructure and services, and updates the conditions for and sentencing of criminal copyright infringement. It was introduced to Parliament by culture secretary John Whittingdale on 5 July 2016. Whittingdale was replaced as culture secretary by Karen Bradley on 14 July 2016. The act received Royal Assent on 27 April 2017.

First May ministry

Theresa May formed the first May ministry on 13 July 2016, after having been invited by Queen Elizabeth II to form a new government. Then the Home Secretary, May's appointment followed the resignation of then Prime Minister David Cameron. The ministry, a Conservative majority government, succeeded the second Cameron ministry which had been formed following the 2015 general election. Cameron's government was dissolved as a result of his resignation in the immediate aftermath of the June 2016 referendum on British withdrawal from the European Union.

After the 2017 snap general election resulted in a hung parliament, with no party holding an overall majority, May announced her intention to form a new minority government with support from the Democratic Unionist Party (see Conservative–DUP agreement).

Gavin Williamson

Gavin Alexander Williamson (born 25 June 1976) is a British Conservative politician serving as Secretary of State for Education since 2019 under the Johnson ministry. Williamson served as Secretary of State for Defence from November 2017 to 2019. On 1 May 2019 he was dismissed as Defence Secretary, following a leak from the National Security Council; Williamson has denied leaking the information.

He has served as Member of Parliament (MP) for South Staffordshire since the 2010 general election. Williamson served in the Second Cameron ministry as Parliamentary Private Secretary (PPS) to Patrick McLoughlin, the Secretary of State for Transport prior to being appointed Parliamentary Private Secretary to the Prime Minister in October 2013. From 14 July 2016 to 2 November 2017, he served as Chief Whip in the May Government.

Jack Brereton

Jack Edgar Brereton (born 13 May 1991) is a British politician, sitting as Conservative Party MP for the Stoke-on-Trent South constituency since the 2017 general election and a councillor on Stoke-on-Trent City Council.

James Brokenshire

James Peter Brokenshire (born 7 January 1968) is a British politician who served as Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government from 2018 to 2019. A member of the Conservative Party, he has been the Member of Parliament (MP) for Old Bexley and Sidcup since 2010. Brokenshire was first elected as the MP for Hornchurch in 2005; he served in the Cameron Government as Minister for Security and Immigration at the Home Office (2014–2016) and in the May Government as Secretary of State for Northern Ireland (2016–2018), overseeing the Stormont deadlock.Born in Southend-on-Sea, Essex, Brokenshire studied law at the University of Exeter before beginning work with a large international law firm. Deciding on a career in politics, he stood successfully as the Conservative candidate for the parliamentary constituency of Hornchurch in the 2005 general election. When his constituency was to be abolished in the boundary changes, he sought out another constituency to represent, failing to be selected in six constituencies until being selected for Old Bexley and Sidcup. He was elected MP for the area in 2010, on a campaign devoted to preventing the closure of accident and emergency services at Queen Mary's Hospital, Sidcup, a policy on which he was unsuccessful.

In the frontbench team of David Cameron, he was Parliamentary Under-Secretary for Crime Reduction; in May 2011 was transferred to the position of Parliamentary Under-Secretary for Crime and Security. He oversaw the closure and privatisation of the Forensic Science Service and championed the Modern Slavery Bill. In February 2014, he was appointed Minister for Security and Immigration. In July 2016, under Theresa May's new cabinet, he was appointed to be Northern Ireland Secretary. He stood down from this role in January 2018 on health grounds and was replaced by Karen Bradley. In April 2018, he was appointed Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government following Sajid Javid's appointment to Home Secretary as a result of Amber Rudd's resignation.

Jeremy Wright

Jeremy Paul Wright (born 24 October 1972) is a British lawyer and politician who served as Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport from 2018 to 2019. A member of he Conservative Party, he has been the Member of Parliament (MP) for Kenilworth and Southam since 2010. Wright was first elected in 2005 as the MP for Rugby and Kenilworth, a constituency that was abolished at the next general election.

He served as Lord Commissioner of the Treasury from 12 May 2010 until his appointment as Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State for Justice on 6 September 2012. He became Attorney General for England and Wales and Advocate General for Northern Ireland on 15 July 2014; Wright replaced Matt Hancock as Culture Secretary on 9 July 2018.

Julian Smith (politician)

Julian Richard Smith (born 30 August 1971) is a British Conservative Party politician serving as Member of Parliament (MP) for Skipton and Ripon since the 2010 general election. In 2019 he was appointed Secretary of State for Northern Ireland.

In 2010, Smith was elected as MP with 27,685 votes (50.6% of the votes cast), giving him a majority of 9,950 votes. Smith retained the seat in 2015 and in 2017. He was appointed Chief Whip of the House of Commons by Prime Minister Theresa May in November 2017 until July 2019.

Matt Hancock

Matthew John David Hancock (born 2 October 1978) is a British politician serving as Secretary of State for Health and Social Care since 2018. A member of the Conservative Party, he has been the Member of Parliament (MP) for West Suffolk since the 2010 United Kingdom general election.

Hancock was born in Cheshire, where his family run a software business. Hancock studied PPE at Exeter College, Oxford and Economics at Christ's College, Cambridge. He was an economist at the Bank of England before becoming an economic advisor (and later Chief of Staff) to George Osborne.

Hancock served in a number of middle-ranking ministerial positions from September 2013 under both David Cameron and Theresa May. He was promoted to the Cabinet in the 2018 British cabinet reshuffle where he was appointed Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport in January 2018. On 9 July 2018, after the promotion of Jeremy Hunt to Foreign Secretary, Hancock was named Secretary of State for Health and Social Care. On 25 May 2019, Hancock announced his intention to stand in the 2019 Conservative Party (UK) leadership election. He withdrew from the race on 14 June shortly after the first ballot.

Natalie Evans, Baroness Evans of Bowes Park

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Procedure Committee

The Procedure Committee is a select committee of the House of Commons in the Parliament of the United Kingdom. The remit of the committee is to consider the practice and procedure of the House in the conduct of public business.

Second May ministry

The second May ministry was formed on 11 June 2017 after Queen Elizabeth II invited Theresa May to form a government following the June 2017 snap general election. The election resulted in a hung parliament with the Conservative Party losing its majority in the House of Commons. On 9 June 2017, May announced her intention to form a Conservative minority government, reliant on the confidence and supply of the Democratic Unionist Party; a finalised agreement between the two parties was signed and published on 26 June 2017.May announced on 24 May 2019 that she would resign as leader of the Conservative Party on 7 June. She remained in office as caretaker Prime Minister during the resulting Conservative Party leadership election, before resigning as Prime Minister on 24 July, after which she was succeeded by Boris Johnson as Prime Minister.

Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport

Her Majesty's Principal Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, or informally Culture Secretary, is a United Kingdom cabinet position with responsibility for the Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport (DCMS). The role was created in 1992 by John Major as Secretary of State for National Heritage. The first to fill the role, David Mellor, dubbed it "Minister of Fun". On 9 July 2018 Theresa May appointed Jeremy Wright to the post.

Shailesh Vara

Shailesh Lakhman Vara (born 4 September 1960) is a British politician. He is a member of the Conservative Party and Member of Parliament (MP) for North West Cambridgeshire in the 2005 general election, succeeding Brian Mawhinney as the Conservative MP for the seat. Vara is a former Vice-Chairman of the Conservative Party.

In 2006, he was appointed to the shadow ministerial post of Shadow Deputy Leader of the House of Commons. He previously held Parliamentary Under Secretary of State roles at the Ministry of Justice and Department of Work and Pensions, before being appointed to the Northern Ireland Office (NIO) under Karen Bradley in January 2018. Vara resigned as an NIO minister in November 2018 over the Government's proposed Brexit agreement.

Staffordshire Moorlands

Staffordshire Moorlands is a local government district in Staffordshire, England. Its council, Staffordshire Moorlands District Council, is based in Leek and is located between the city of Stoke-on-Trent and the Peak District National Park. The 2001 census recorded the population as 94,489.Principal industries are agriculture, fashion and tourism. The area's three towns are Leek, Cheadle and Biddulph. Visitor attractions include the National Trust property Biddulph Grange, the Churnet Valley Railway, the UK's largest and number one theme park Alton Towers Resort, and the annual Leek Arts Festival. There are also a variety of outdoor pursuits such as rock climbing (The Roaches), sailing (Rudyard Lake) and cycling (Waterhouses).

Staffordshire Moorlands (UK Parliament constituency)

Staffordshire Moorlands is a constituency represented in the House of Commons of the UK Parliament since 2010 by Karen Bradley, a Conservative who has served as Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport since July 2016, before she became Secretary of State for Northern Ireland. As with all constituencies, the constituency elects one Member of Parliament (MP) by the first past the post system of election at least every five years. This seat has seen a swing to the Conservatives at the past three elections.

Cabinet members
Also attend meetings
Cabinet members
Also attend meetings
Departures
Secretary of State for National Heritage
(1992–1997)
Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport
(1997–2010)
Secretary of State for Culture, Olympics, Media and Sport
(2010–2012)
Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport
(2012–2017)
Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport
(2017–present)
Secretary of State
Minister of State for Northern Ireland
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