Kanangra-Boyd National Park

The Kanangra-Boyd National Park is a protected national park that is located in the Central Tablelands region, west of the Southern Highlands and Macarthur regions, in New South Wales, in eastern Australia. The 68,660-hectare (169,700-acre) national park is situated approximately 180 kilometres (110 mi) south-west of Sydney and is contiguous with the Blue Mountains National Park and the Nattai National Park. The park was established in 1969.

The Kanangra-Boyd National Park is one of the eight protected areas that, in 2000, was inscribed to form part of the UNESCO World Heritage–listed Greater Blue Mountains Area.[2] The Kanangra-Boyd National Park is the most south–westerly of the eight protected areas within the World Heritage Site. The national park forms part of the Great Dividing Range.

Notable features of the national park include the Thurat Spires, Kanangra Walls, Mount Colong, and three waterfall systems – the Kalang, the 225-metre (738 ft) two–tiered drop Kanangara and the Morong falls. The park also features a series of karst landforms that can be explored by those with caving experience.[3]

The movie Jedda was filmed in the Kanangra Walls area in 1954.

Kanangra-Boyd National Park
New South Wales
IUCN category Ib (wilderness area)
Kanangra view of valley 2002
Kanangra Grand Gorge
Kanangra-Boyd National Park is located in New South Wales
Kanangra-Boyd National Park
Kanangra-Boyd National Park
Nearest town or cityOberon
Coordinates33°56′16″S 150°05′27″E / 33.93778°S 150.09083°ECoordinates: 33°56′16″S 150°05′27″E / 33.93778°S 150.09083°E
Established3 December 1969[1]
Area686.6 km2 (265.1 sq mi)[1]
Managing authoritiesNSW National Parks & Wildlife Service
WebsiteKanangra-Boyd National Park
See alsoProtected areas of
New South Wales

Features and location

Kanangra Walls 2002
Kanangra Walls seen from Echo Head.
Mt Cloudmaker NSW
Mount Cloudmaker.
Kanagra-Boyd National Park
The mountains seen from The Plateau Walk
Kanangra Boyd Nat Park
View from Kanangra Walls.
Kanangra-Boyd National Park near Boyd River
Forest near Morong Creek.
Kanangra winter wonderland
Morong Creek campground in winter.

Kanangra-Boyd National Park is composed of two land units — the elevated, gently undulating Boyd Plateau and the area of creeks, rivers, gorges and ridges into which the plateau falls away. The plateau is traversed by the Kanangra Walls Road and can be accessed either from Oberon or Jenolan Caves. The road leads to Kanangra Walls. There are several well known landmarks in the park, such as Mount Cloudmaker, Kanangra Walls and the Thurat Spires. The word Kanangra is generally held to be a corruption of Gundangura and was called Thurat for some time.

The national park is bounded to the north by open farmland; to the east by the Coxs River, the Blue Mountains National Park and the Kowmung River; to the south–east by the Yerranderie State Conservation Area; to the south by the Nattai National Park and the Wombeyan Caves Road; to the south–west by the Blue Mountains National Park; and to the west by the Kowmung River, the Jenolan Karst Conservation Reserve, and open farmland and extensive state forests that surround the town of Oberon.[4] The Abercrombie River National Park is situated a short distance, further south–west.

Geology

The Kanangra-Boyd Wilderness is among the largest and most rugged wilderness areas in New South Wales. Situated to the south of Katoomba in the Blue Mountains and the Kanangra-Boyd National Parks, this folded belt or "Rim Rock" area is markedly different from the Permo-Triassic sandstone dominated landforms which comprise the rest of the Blue Mountains. There are isolated residual cappings of Permian sandstone in a few places but here the Palaeozoic basement rocks, which are elsewhere buried well below the Permo-Triassic Measures, are on the surface as high land. Rock types include quartzite, diorite, Devonian rhyolites, rhyo-dacites, Silurian phyllites, slates, siltstones and tuff limestones. The Boyd Plateau comprises a dome of Devonian granite intruded into Devonian quartzites and sedimentaries. There are also intrusive igneous rocks from the Carboniferous period. Kanangra Tops at the south-eastern end of the Plateau is one of the Permian outliers. Its fringing fault scarp – Kanangra Walls – comprises Permian sedimentaries of the Capertee Group which rests unconformably on a Devonian Lambie Group Basement. Nearby Kanangra Gorge is cut 600–900 metres (2,000–3,000 ft) deep in rocks of the Lambie Group, and is one of Australia's deepest gorges. Cloudmaker and Guouogang are eroded remnants of Ordovician quartzite. Further east, in the Coxs River area, is the large Kanimbla granite batholith, implaced during the Carboniferous period. Colong Caves is another outstanding feature of the area. The main Upper Silurian limestone belt, in the Jenolan River valley to the north-west, is 300 metres (980 ft) thick, 8 kilometres (5.0 mi) long and located in a valley 460 metres (1,510 ft) deep. This karst topography, created by the Jenolan and its tributaries, is one of the least understood in Australia.[5]

Flora

The complex geology, climate, fire regime, and topography has enabled a wide variety of ecosystems to develop. Eucalypt forest with western plain species, such as yellow box and white box, are found in areas of rainshadow. Forests of mountain ash are found on well drained soils and Blaxland's stringybark where soil is poor. red spotted gum, Blakely's red gum, red stringybark and forest oak are also found. Kurrajong trees are found in abundance where limestone outcrops occur, and in sheltered gullies rainforest species (including red cedar) and blue gum are found. On the Boyd Plateau, the misty mountain forests of brown barrel, messmate, ribbon gum, black sally, snow gum and mallee predominate. High altitude areas subject to strong winds generally support heath and closed scrub communities. In areas of impeded drainage, various swamps occur, dominated by sedges and scrubs such as Leptospermum and Baeckea species.[5]

About 1,000 flowering plant species occur in the Blue Mountains, in some 40 plant communities. There are over 45 rare or endangered plant species in the wilderness. A unique form of tall open forest occurs in the Kedumba Valley, dominated by Camden white gum, an endangered species limited to these populations.[5]

Fauna

The Blue Mountains National Park contains 46 species of mammals, including 27 marsupials and two monotremes. Over 200 birds and 98 reptile species have been recorded. Several species listed on Schedules 1 and 2 of the Threatened Species Conservation Act 1995 (NSW) are found in the Wilderness Area including: The powerful owl (Ninox strenua), squirrel glider (Petaurus norfolcensis), yellow-bellied glider (Petaurus volans), tiger quoll (Dasyurus maculatus), and brush-tailed rock wallaby (Petrogale penicillata). A species of velvet worm (Euperipatoides kanangrensis) has been found on the Boyd Plateau.[5]

Bushwalking

There are several walking tracks and other sites in the park, these include the:[6]

  • Lookout Walk – the easiest and wheelchair accessible, this ten-minute route along well-formed tracks leads to the first lookout which overlooks the gorges of Kanangra Creek and beyond to the high tops of Mt Cloudmaker and the Blue Mountains escarpment, which presents a spectacular vista. The second overlooks rugged ravines at the head of the gorges and Kanangra Falls;
  • Waterfall Walk – accessible from the Lookout Walk, this route leads down into a gully where the Kalang Falls splash into a pool; and
  • Plateau Walk – turns off before the main lookout and leads into the Kanangra Wilderness and onto the expansive heath-covered Kanangra Tops Plateau. It is possible to walk continuously from this walk to Katoomba and Narrow Neck.

Camping is available on the banks of Morong Creek, at the Boyd River campground, located on Kanangra Road.[7]

See also

References

  1. ^ a b "Kanangra-Boyd National Park: Park management". Office of Environment & Heritage. Government of New South Wales. Retrieved 6 October 2014.
  2. ^ "Greater Blue Mountains Area". World Heritage List. UNESCO. 2014. Retrieved 31 August 2014.
  3. ^ "Kanangra-Boyd National Park". NSW National Parks & Wildlife Service. Government of New South Wales. Retrieved 6 October 2014.
  4. ^ "Kanangra-Boyd National Park". Office of Environment & Heritage. Government of New South Wales. Archived from the original on 28 October 2009. Retrieved 6 October 2014.
  5. ^ a b c d "Kanangra-Boyd Wilderness". NSW Wilderness Red Index. The Colong Foundation for Wilderness. 1999. Retrieved 24 December 2013.
  6. ^ "Kanangra-Boyd National Park: Facilities and activities". Office of Environment & Heritage. Government of New South Wales. Retrieved 6 October 2014.
  7. ^ "Boyd River campground". NSW National Parks & Wildlife Service. Government of New South Wales. Retrieved 6 October 2014.

External links

Black Banksia Falls

The Black Banksia Falls is a waterfall that is located within the Kanangra-Boyd National Park in the Central Tablelands region of New South Wales, Australia.

Diuris aequalis

Diuris aequalis, commonly called the buttercup doubletail, is a species of orchid which is endemic to New South Wales. It has two rolled leaves and spikes of two to five golden-yellow to orange flowers and is classified as "vulnerable".

Euperipatoides kanangrensis

Euperipatoides kanangrensis is a species of velvet worm of the Peripatopsidae family, described in 1996 from specimens collected in Kanangra-Boyd National Park, New South Wales. It is endemic to Australia. The embryonic development of Euperipatoides kanangrensis has been described. This species is used as model organism for the last common ancestor of the Panarthropoda. It resembles fossil Cambrian lobopodians.

Ficus coronata

Ficus coronata, commonly known as the sandpaper fig or creek sandpaper fig, is a species of fig tree, native to Australia. It is found along the east coast from Mackay in Central Queensland, through New South Wales and just into Victoria near Mallacoota. It grows along river banks and gullies in rainforest and open forest. Its common name is derived from its rough sandpapery leaves, which it shares with the other sandpaper figs.

Genoplesium morinum

Genoplesium morinum, commonly known as the mulberry midge orchid and as Corunastylis morina in Australia, is a small terrestrial orchid endemic to New South Wales. It has a single thin leaf fused to the flowering stem and up to twenty crowded, dark reddish purple flowers. It has been known as "mulberries on sticks".

Greater Blue Mountains Area

The Greater Blue Mountains Area is a World Heritage Site in the Blue Mountains of New South Wales, Australia. The 1,032,649-hectare (2,551,730-acre) area was inscribed on the World Heritage List at the 24th Session of the World Heritage Committee, held in Cairns in 2000.

Hakea dohertyi

Hakea dohertyi, commonly known as the Kowmung hakea, is a shrub endemic to a restricted locale in the Great Dividing Range in central New South Wales in Australia.

Kanangra

Kanangra is an Australian Aboriginal word for "beautiful view" and may refer to:

MV Kanangra, formerly SS Kanangra, a retired passenger ferry on Sydney Harbour

Kanangra-Boyd National Park, located in the Central Tablelands region of New South Wales in Australia

Kanangra Creek, a creek in the Kanangra-Boyd National Park

Kanangra Falls, a waterfall on the Kanangra Creek

Kanangra wattle, a shrub belonging to the genus Acacia and the subgenus Phyllodineae that is endemic to New South Wales

Kanangra Creek

The Kanangra Creek, a perennial stream of the Hawkesbury-Nepean catchment, is located in the Blue Mountains region of New South Wales, Australia.

Kanangra Falls

Kanangra Falls is a waterfall on the Kanangra River, in the Kanangra-Boyd National Park, near Oberon, in the Central Tablelands of New South Wales, Australia. The waterfall is located at Thurat Walls about 800 metres (2,600 ft) north east of Ianthe Hill; with the fall height reported in 1930 as being 225 metres (738 feet) in two sections.Kanangra Falls is popular with canyoning and abseiling groups, although this type of activity is often not permitted due to safety concerns.

Kowmung River

The Kowmung River (Aboriginal: Barnalay), a perennial river that is part of the Hawkesbury-Nepean catchment, is located in the Central Tablelands region of New South Wales, Australia.

Kunzea cambagei

Kunzea cambagei, commonly known as the Cambage kunzea is a flowering plant in the myrtle family, Myrtaceae and is endemic to a small area of New South Wales. It is a small shrub with egg-shaped leaves and clusters of cream-coloured to yellowish flowers near the end of the branches. It is only known from areas near Mount Werong in the Kanangra-Boyd National Park and Berrima.

List of waterfalls of Australia

This is a list of waterfalls in Australia.

Wallaman Falls in Queensland are Australia's tallest permanent waterfall with a plunge of nearly 300 metres (980 ft). Wollomombi Falls in New South Wales are second with a 220-metre (720 ft) combined drop and Ellenborough Falls, also in New South Wales, is third plunging 160 metres (520 ft) as a single drop.

Little River (Oberon)

The Little River, a perennial river that is part of the Hawkesbury-Nepean catchment, is located in the Central Tablelands region of New South Wales, Australia.

Nattai National Park

The Nattai National Park is a protected national park that is located in the Macarthur and Southern Highlands regions of New South Wales, in eastern Australia. 48,984-hectare (121,040-acre) It is situated approximately 150 kilometres (93 mi) southwest of the Sydney central business district and primarily encompasses the valley of the Nattai River, which is surrounded by spectacular sandstone cliffs. The park is covered in dry sclerophyll (hard leafed) forest - mostly eucalypt, and has fairly frequent forest fires. It is largely an untouched wilderness area and receives very few visitors, as it has virtually no facilities and is fairly remote, despite its proximity to Sydney..

The Nattai National Park is one of the eight protected areas that, in 2000, was inscribed to form part of the UNESCO World Heritage–listed Greater Blue Mountains Area. The Nattai National Park is the most southern of the eight protected areas within the World Heritage Site. The national park forms part of the Great Dividing Range.

The national park is bounded to the north by the Nattai State Conservation Area, the Burragorang State Conservation Area, and Lake Burragorang, inclusive of a 3-kilometre (1.9 mi) exclusion zone surrounding the lake; to the east by the Bargo State Conservation Area and the now partly disused Picton – Mittagong loop railway line; to the south by the Wombeyan Caves Road; to the south–west by the Kanangra-Boyd National Park; and to the west by the Yerranderie State Conservation Area. The Blue Mountains National Park does not directly adjoin the Nattai National Park, located on the north–western shore of Lake Burragorang.The Nattai National Park contains much of the course and catchment of the Little, Nattai, Allum and Wollondilly rivers.

Oberon, New South Wales

Oberon is a town located within the Oberon Council local government area, in the central tablelands region of New South Wales, Australia. The main industries are farming, forestry and wood products. The town usually receives snowfall during the winter months, owing to its high elevation. At the 2016 census, Oberon had a population of 3,256 people.It is the birthplace of Greens politician Bob Brown, Ken Sutcliffe, supermotard rider Scott Saul and former Penrith Panthers player Mark Booth. Oberon is located near Jenolan Caves and the Kanangra-Boyd National Park.

Prasophyllum helophilum

Prasophyllum helophilum is a species of orchid endemic to New South Wales. It has a single tubular green leaf and up to twenty five purplish white and brown flowers. It grows in wet, swampy places on the central tablelands.

Westmoreland County, New South Wales

Westmoreland County was one of the original Nineteen Counties in New South Wales and is now one of the 141 Cadastral divisions of New South Wales. It is to the west of Sydney in the Blue Mountains. Coxs River is the border to the north, and the Wollondilly River to the east. Campbells River is the border in the north-east, where the county extends to near Bathurst, with the Fish River part of the border. It includes the town of Oberon, and the Kanangra-Boyd National Park.

Westmoreland County is named in honour of John Fane, Tenth Earl of Westmorland (1759-1841). The Electoral district of Cook and Westmoreland was the first state electoral district for the area, between 1856 and 1859.

Yerranderie

Yerranderie is a ghost town located near Kanangra-Boyd National Park of New South Wales, Australia in Wollondilly Shire.

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