Kaʻala

Kaʻala or Mount Kaʻala (pronounced [kəˈʔɐlə] in Hawaiian) is the highest mountain on the island of Oahu, at 4,025 feet (1,227 m). It is a part of the Waianae Range, an eroded shield volcano on the west side of the island. The FAA maintains an active tracking station at the summit, which is closed to the general public and secured by the US Army which is stationed at the base of the mountain, at Schofield Barracks. The tracking station can be clearly seen from afar as a white domed shaped structure.

Kaʻala
Kaala Plateau USGS
Plateau at the summit of Mount Kaʻala
Highest point
Elevation4,025 ft (1,227 m) [1]
Prominence4,025 ft (1,227 m)
Coordinates21°30′25″N 158°08′34″W / 21.50694°N 158.14278°WCoordinates: 21°30′25″N 158°08′34″W / 21.50694°N 158.14278°W[2]
Naming
Language of nameHawaiian
PronunciationHawaiian pronunciation: [kəˈʔɐlə]
Geography
Kaʻala is located in Hawaii
Kaʻala
Kaʻala
Hawaiian Islands
LocationOahu, Hawaii, US
Parent rangeWaianae Range
Topo mapUSGS Haleiwa
Geology
Age of rock3.9 Ma
Mountain typePlateau
Volcanic arc/beltHawaiian-Emperor seamount chain

See also

References

  1. ^ "Mt. Mount Ka'ala". Department of Forestry and Wildlife. State of Hawaii. Retrieved 2013-02-21.
  2. ^ "Ka'ala". Geographic Names Information System. United States Geological Survey. Retrieved 2009-12-23.
Anna Ranch Heritage Center

Anna Ranch Heritage Center is a former cattle ranch in Waimea, Hawaii County, Hawaii named for Anna Leialoha Lindsey Perry-Fiske (1900–1995).

Delano Peak

Delano Peak is the highest point in the Tushar Mountains of south-central Utah. The Tushars are the third-highest range in the state, after the Uinta Mountains and the La Sal Range, though Delano itself is surpassed in height by at least thirty-one other Utah peaks.

Located in the Fishlake National Forest, Delano Peak is the highest point in both Beaver and Piute counties. The mountain is named for Columbus Delano (1809–1896), Secretary of the Interior during the Grant administration.

Granite Peak (Humboldt County, Nevada)

Granite Peak is the highest mountain in both the Santa Rosa Range and Humboldt County, in Nevada, United States. It is the eighteenth-most topographically prominent peak in the state. The peak is located within the Santa Rosa Ranger District of the Humboldt-Toiyabe National Forest, about 12 miles north of the small town of Paradise Valley and 23 miles southeast of the small town of McDermitt. It is the highest mountain for over 80 miles in all directions.

Hawaii

Hawaii ( (listen) hə-WY-ee; Hawaiian: Hawaiʻi [həˈvɐjʔi]) is a state of the United States of America. It is the only state located in the Pacific Ocean and the only state composed entirely of islands.

The state encompasses nearly the entire Hawaiian archipelago, 137 islands spread over 1,500 miles (2,400 km). The volcanic archipelago is physiographically and ethnologically part of the Polynesian subregion of Oceania. At the southeastern end of the archipelago, the eight main islands are, in order from northwest to southeast: Niʻihau, Kauaʻi, Oʻahu, Molokaʻi, Lānaʻi, Kahoʻolawe, Maui, and Hawaiʻi. The last is the largest island in the group; it is often called the "Big Island" or "Hawaiʻi Island" to avoid confusion with the state or archipelago.

Hawaii is the 8th smallest geographically and the 11th least populous, but the 13th most densely populated of the 50 states. It is the only state with an Asian American plurality. Hawaii has over 1.4 million permanent residents, along with many visitors and U.S. military personnel. The state capital and largest city is Honolulu on the island of Oʻahu. The state's ocean coastline is about 750 miles (1,210 km) long, the fourth longest in the U.S., after the coastlines of Alaska, Florida, and California. Hawaii is the most recent state to join the union, on August 21, 1959. It was an independent nation until 1898.

Hawaii's diverse natural scenery, warm tropical climate, abundance of public beaches, oceanic surroundings, and active volcanoes make it a popular destination for tourists, surfers, biologists, and volcanologists. Because of its central location in the Pacific and 19th-century labor migration, Hawaii's culture is strongly influenced by North American and East Asian cultures, in addition to its indigenous Hawaiian culture.

Hawaiian Islands

The Hawaiian Islands (Hawaiian: Mokupuni o Hawai‘i) are an archipelago of eight major islands, several atolls, numerous smaller islets, and seamounts in the North Pacific Ocean, extending some 1,500 miles (2,400 kilometers) from the island of Hawaiʻi in the south to northernmost Kure Atoll. Formerly the group was known to Europeans and Americans as the Sandwich Islands, a name chosen by James Cook in honor of the then First Lord of the Admiralty John Montagu, 4th Earl of Sandwich. The contemporary name is derived from the name of the largest island, Hawaii Island.

Although Hawaii is now a U.S. state, it is only a part of the U.S. politically and not geographically connected to North America. The state of Hawaii occupies the archipelago almost in its entirety (including the uninhabited Northwestern Hawaiian Islands), with the sole exception of Midway Island, which instead separately belongs to the United States as one of its unincorporated territories within the United States Minor Outlying Islands.

The Hawaiian Islands are the exposed peaks of a great undersea mountain range known as the Hawaiian–Emperor seamount chain, formed by volcanic activity over a hotspot in the Earth's mantle. The islands are about 1,860 miles (3,000 km) from the nearest continent.

Hawaiian lobelioids

The Hawaiian lobelioids are a group of flowering plants in the bellflower family, Campanulaceae, all of which are endemic to the Hawaiian Islands. This is the largest plant radiation in the Hawaiian Islands, and indeed the largest on any island archipelago, with over 125 species. The six genera can be broadly separated based on growth habit: Clermontia are typically branched shrubs or small trees, up to 7 metres (23 ft) tall, with fleshy fruits; Cyanea and Delissea are typically unbranched or branching only at the base, with a cluster of relatively broad leaves at the apex and fleshy fruits; Lobelia and Trematolobelia have long thin leaves down a single, non-woody stem and capsular fruits with wind-dispersed seeds; and the peculiar Brighamia have a short, thick stem with a dense cluster of broad leaves, elongate white flowers, and capsular fruits.

The group contains morphologically divergent species, and was long thought to have derived from at least three introductions: one for Lobelia and Trematolobelia, one for Brighamia, and one for Clermontia, Cyanea, and Delissea. Based on recent DNA sequence evidence (Givnish et al., 1996, 2008) it now believed that all are derived from a single introduction. This was likely a Lobelia-like species that arrived about 13 million years ago, when Gardner Pinnacles and French Frigate Shoals were high islands and long before the current main islands existed.

Many species have beautiful and spectacular flowers, especially those in Lobelia and Trematolobelia. Unfortunately, they are also highly vulnerable to feeding by feral ungulates such as feral pigs; the stems are only partly woody, and contain few defenses against herbivory. The bark contains a milky (but apparently non-poisonous) latex, and is often chewed by rats and pigs. Seedlings are also vulnerable to disturbance by pig digging, and in areas with high densities of pigs it is not uncommon to find the only lobelioids being epiphytic on larger trees or on fallen logs.

Hyposmocoma anisoplecta

Hyposmocoma anisoplecta is a species of moth of the family Cosmopterigidae. It was first described by Edward Meyrick in 1935. It is endemic to the Hawaiian island of Oahu. The type locality is Mount Kaʻala.

Hyposmocoma caecinervis

Hyposmocoma caecinervis is a species of moth of the family Cosmopterigidae. It was first described by Edward Meyrick in 1928. It is endemic to the Hawaiian island of Oahu. The type locality is Mount Kaʻala.

The larvae feed on Smilax sandwicensis. They bore in the dead stems.

Hyposmocoma hemicasis

Hyposmocoma hemicasis is a species of moth of the family Cosmopterigidae. It was first described by Edward Meyrick in 1935. It is endemic to the Hawaiian island of Oahu. The type locality is Mount Kaʻala.

List of mountain peaks of Hawaii

This article comprises three sortable tables of the 13 major mountain peaks of the Hawaiian Islands and the U.S. State of Hawaiʻi. Each of these 13 major summits has at least 500 meters (1640 feet) of topographic prominence.

The summit of a mountain or hill may be measured in three principal ways:

The topographic elevation of a summit measures the height of the summit above a geodetic sea level. The first table below ranks the 13 major summits of Hawaiʻi by topographic elevation.

The topographic prominence of a summit is a measure of how high the summit rises above its surroundings. The second table below ranks the 13 major summits of Hawaiʻi by topographic prominence.

The topographic isolation (or radius of dominance) of a summit measures how far the summit lies from its nearest point of equal elevation. The third table below ranks the 13 major summits of Hawaiʻi by topographic isolation.

List of mountains of the United States

This list includes significant mountain peaks and high points located in the United States arranged alphabetically by state, district, or territory. The highest peak or point in each state, district or territory is noted in bold.

List of the major 100-kilometer summits of the United States

The following sortable table lists the 113 mountain peaks of the United States with at least 100 kilometers (62.14 miles) of topographic isolation and at least 500 meters (1640 feet) of topographic prominence. 107 mountain peaks are located in the 50 states, while 6 mountain peaks are located in the U.S. territories.

The summit of a mountain or hill may be measured in three principal ways:

The topographic elevation of a summit measures the height of the summit above a geodetic sea level.

The topographic prominence of a summit is a measure of how high the summit rises above its surroundings.

The topographic isolation (or radius of dominance) of a summit measures how far the summit lies from its nearest point of equal elevation.In the United States, only Denali exceeds 4000 kilometers (2485 miles) of topographic isolation. Three major summits exceed 2000 kilometers (1243 miles), eight exceed 1000 kilometers (621.4 miles), 13 exceed 500 kilometers (310.7 miles), 47 exceed 200 kilometers (124.3 miles), the following 113 major summits exceed 100 kilometers (62.14 miles), and 214 exceed 50 kilometers (31.07 miles) of topographic isolation.

List of the most prominent summits of the United States

The following sortable table comprises the 200 most topographically prominent mountain peaks of the United States of America.

The summit of a mountain or hill may be measured in three principal ways:

The topographic elevation of a summit measures the height of the summit above a geodetic sea level.

The topographic prominence of a summit is a measure of how high the summit rises above its surroundings.

The topographic isolation (or radius of dominance) of a summit measures how far the summit lies from its nearest point of equal elevation.Denali is one of only three summits on Earth with more than 6000 meters (19,685 feet) of topographic prominence. Three summits of the United States exceed 4000 meters (13,123 feet), six exceed 3500 meters (11,483 feet), ten exceed 3000 meters (9843 feet), 19 exceed 2500 meters (8202 feet), 45 exceed 2000 meters (6562 feet), 128 ultra-prominent summits exceed 1500 meters (4921 feet), and 264 major summits exceed 1000 meters (3281 feet) of topographic prominence.

Native cuisine of Hawaii

Native Hawaiian cuisine is based on the traditional Hawaiian foods that predate contact with Europeans and immigration from East and Southeast Asia. The earliest Polynesian seafarers are believed to have arrived on the Hawaiian Islands in 300–500 AD. Few edible plants were indigenous to Hawaii aside from few ferns and fruits that grew at higher elevations. Various food producing plants were introduced to the island by migrating Polynesian peoples.

Botanists and archaeologists believe that these voyagers introduced anywhere from 27 to more than 30 plants to the islands, mainly for food. The most important of them was taro. For centuries, taro—and the poi made from it—was the main staple of the Hawaiian diet, and it is still much loved. ‘Uala (Sweet potatoes) and yams were also planted. The Marquesans, the first settlers from Polynesia, brought ‘Ulu (breadfruit) and the Tahitians later introduced the baking banana. Settlers from Polynesia also brought coconuts and sugarcane. ʻAwa (Piper methysticum, commonly known as kava) is also a traditional food among Hawaiians. Breadfruit, sweet potato, kava and he‘e (octopus) are associated with the four major Hawaiian gods: Kāne, Kū, Lono and Kanaloa.Fish, shellfish, and limu are abundant in Hawaii. Flightless birds were easy to catch and eggs from nests were also eaten. Most Pacific islands had no meat animals except bats and lizards.Ancient Polynesians sailed the Pacific with pigs, chickens and dogs and introduced them to the islands. Pigs were raised for religious sacrifice, and the meat was offered at altars, some of which was consumed by priests and the rest eaten in a mass celebration. The early Hawaiian diet was diverse, and may have included as many as 130 different types of seafood and 230 types of sweet potatoes. Some species of land and sea birds were consumed into extinction.Sea salt was a common condiment in ancient Hawaii. Inamona is a traditional relish or condiment often accompanied meals and is made of roasted and mashed kukui nutmeats, and sea salt. It sometimes mixed with seaweeds

Natural Area Reserves System Hawaii

The Natural Area Reserves System (NARS) of Hawaii is a statewide attempt to preserve in perpetuity specific land and water areas which support communities, as relatively unmodified as possible, of the natural flora and fauna, as well as geological sites, of Hawaii.

Oahu

Oʻahu (pronounced [oˈʔɐhu]) anglicized Oahu (), known as "The Gathering Place", is the third-largest of the Hawaiian Islands. It is home to roughly one million people—about two-thirds of the population of the U.S. state of Hawaii. The state capital, Honolulu, is on Oʻahu's southeast coast. Including small associated islands such as Ford Island and the islands in Kāneʻohe Bay and off the eastern (windward) coast, its area is 596.7 square miles (1,545.4 km2), making it the 20th-largest island in the United States.Oʻahu is 44 miles (71 km) long and 30 miles (48 km) across. Its shoreline is 227 miles (365 km) long. The island is composed of two separate shield volcanoes: the Waiʻanae and Koʻolau Ranges, with a broad "valley" or saddle (the central Oʻahu Plain) between them. The highest point is Kaʻala in the Waiʻanae Range, rising to 4,003 feet (1,220 m) above sea level.

Ruby Dome

Ruby Dome is the highest mountain in both the Ruby Mountains and Elko County, in Nevada, United States. It is the twenty-seventh-highest mountain in the state, and also ranks as the thirteenth-most topographically prominent peak in the state. The peak is located about 21 miles (34 km) southeast of the city of Elko within the Ruby Mountains Ranger District of the Humboldt-Toiyabe National Forest. The mountain rises from a base elevation of about 6,000 feet (1,800 m) to a height of 11,387 feet (3,471 m). It is the highest mountain for over 90 miles in all directions.

Wahiawa, Hawaii

Wahiawa (Hawaiian: Wahiawā) is a census-designated place (CDP) in Honolulu County, Hawaii, United States, on the island of Oahu. It is located in the Wahiawa District, on the plateau or "central valley" between the two volcanic mountains that comprise the island. In Hawaiian, wahi a wā means "space of the wa people". The population was 17,821 at the 2010 census.Lakes and reservoirs are rare in Hawaii, and Wahiawa is at once unique in being surrounded on three sides by Lake Wilson (also known as Wahiawa Reservoir or Kaukonahua). The town must be accessed by either of two bridges on Kamehameha Highway (State Rte. 80) across the narrow north and south arms of the reservoir. Outside of the reservoir, the town used to be surrounded by military bases and agricultural fields, but development is making its way up from the increasingly urbanized southern portion of the central plain. Still, there are significant U.S. Army facilities here, including Schofield Barracks, Wheeler Army Airfield, and East Range, an Army training area extending into the hills south and east of town. Schofield Barracks alone is larger than Wahiawa. Wahiawa is also the home of the U.S. Navy's Naval Computer and Telecommunications Area Master Station Pacific.

The U.S. postal codes for Wahiawa are 96786 and 96857.

Waianae Range

Waiʻanae Range (sometimes referred to as the Waianae Mountains) is the eroded remains of an ancient shield volcano that comprises the western half of the Hawaiian Island of Oʻahu. Its crest, at Kaʻala, is the highest peak on Oʻahu at 4,025 feet (1,227 m).

Like the neighboring Koʻolau, the Waiʻanae Range is not a mountain range in the sense most people are familiar with, as the mountain range as a whole was created from a single volcano rather than for example plate tectonics.

The oldest lava dated from the volcano are about 3.9 million years old. About 3.2 million years ago, the volcano's activity changed, the rate of eruption started to decrease and the composition of the lava erupted from the volcano changed. The volcano is thought to have last erupted about 2.5 million years ago.

When active, the Waiʻanae volcano's center of activity was at present-day Lualualei Valley. Intense erosion on the western flank of the mountain has destroyed much of those flanks. Thus, the mountain today is much smaller than it was when the volcano was active.

While the western part of the mountain has been destroyed by erosion, the eastern part is still in a youthful stage of erosion. This is considered somewhat strange by some geologists since the western part of the volcano is on the leeward side of the island; thus, most rain falls on the eastern side of the volcano. Given this information, more erosion would be expected on the eastern portion of the mountain. One theory to explain this erosion pattern is that a large landslide cut away the western portion of the volcano. The faults from this huge landslide weakened the rock, making the western part of the mountain much more susceptible to erosion than the eastern side.

Windward
Isles
Leeward
Isles
Emperor
Seamounts
Notable eruptions
and vents
Topics

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