Justin Tucker

Justin Paul Tucker (born November 21, 1989) is an American football placekicker for the Baltimore Ravens of the National Football League (NFL). He played college football for the University of Texas. He was signed by the Ravens as an undrafted free agent in 2012 and, currently, is the most accurate kicker of all time. [1]

Justin Tucker
refer to caption
Tucker in January 2013
No. 9 – Baltimore Ravens
Position:Placekicker
Personal information
Born:November 21, 1989 (age 29)
Houston, Texas
Height:6 ft 1 in (1.85 m)
Weight:180 lb (82 kg)
Career information
High school:Westlake (Austin, Texas)
College:Texas
Undrafted:2012
Career history
Roster status:Active
Career highlights and awards
Career NFL statistics as of Week 17, 2018
Field goals:237/263 (90.1%)
Longest field goal:61
Touchbacks:379
Player stats at NFL.com

Early years

Tucker graduated from Westlake High School, in Austin, Texas, where he was teammates with Jacksonville Jaguars quarterback Nick Foles.[2]

College career

Tucker played for the Texas Longhorns football team while attending the University of Texas. In 2011, concluding a 118-game rivalry between Texas A&M University and the University of Texas, he kicked the game-winning field goal as time expired. Texas (then ranked No. 25) won, 27-25.[3] He played in the 2008 U.S. Army All-American Bowl. While attending the University of Texas, Tucker majored in Music; his degree path was in Recording Technologies.[4]

Professional career

Baltimore Ravens

Justin Tucker kicks field goal in Super Bowl XLVII
Justin Tucker attempts a field goal in Super Bowl XLVII.

An undrafted free agent in the 2012 NFL Draft, Tucker was not selected by any of the 32 teams. However, the Baltimore Ravens signed him on May 29, 2012 to begin workouts and camp for the Ravens alongside placekicker Billy Cundiff.[5] After impressive showings and accurate field goals during the team's preseason games, Tucker earned the starting job as the Ravens official placekicker upon Cundiff's release from his contract with Baltimore on August 26, 2012.[6]

In his debut season, Tucker proved to be a very accurate kicker, making all 42 of his PAT attempts while missing only 3 out of his 35 Field Goals. During Week 3 against the New England Patriots, Tucker kicked a game-winning field goal with 2 seconds left, giving the Ravens a 31–30 victory and their first ever regular season victory over the Patriots. On January 12, 2013, during the divisional playoff round game against the Denver Broncos, Tucker kicked a 47-yard field goal in double overtime to win the game (later known as the Mile High Miracle) and sent the Ravens to the AFC championship for the second consecutive year.[7]

During the 2nd quarter of Super Bowl XLVII against the San Francisco 49ers, Tucker failed in converting the first fake field goal attempt in Super Bowl history, coming up just one yard short of the nine needed for the first down. Nonetheless, the Ravens went on to win the game, giving Tucker his first Super Bowl ring.[8] The following 2013 season, despite missing two field goals in Week 2 against the Cleveland Browns, Tucker continued his success as an accurate kicker for the Ravens. He kicked the game-winning field goal in overtime against the Cincinnati Bengals, letting the Ravens win 20-17. He was named AFC Special Teams Player of the Month for November. On Thanksgiving, Tucker kicked five field goals en route to the Ravens' 22–20 win against the Pittsburgh Steelers. He was also selected as the player of the game along with Jacoby Jones by John Madden. He brought his holder, Sam Koch and long snapper, Morgan Cox, to accept the award on screen with him.

In 2013, Tucker kicked a franchise record-tying six field goals that were the Ravens' only points in an 18–16 win against the Detroit Lions in a Monday Night Football game at Ford Field in Detroit on December 16, including a personal (and franchise) record 61-yard field goal in the last minute to seal the victory. During the game, Tucker became the first kicker in NFL history to kick a field goal in the 20s, 30s, 40s, 50s, and 60s in the same game. Tucker's 61-yard field goal also set the NFL record for longest field goal in a domed stadium.[9] Tucker was elected to his first Pro Bowl to end the 2013 season. He was also voted 1st team All-Pro by AP voters.[10]

On February 26, 2016, the Ravens placed the franchise tag on Tucker.[11] Tucker signed the franchise tender on March 4, 2016, which would pay him $4.5 million.[12] Tucker signed a four-year, $16.8 million extension on July 15, 2016.[13]

In Week 12 of the 2016 season against the Bengals, Tucker kicked four field goals, three for over 50 yards in a 19-14 win, earning him AFC Special Teams Player of the Week.[14] In Week 15 against the Eagles, Tucker tied the NFL single-season record for 10 field goals of more than 50 yards. He was named to his second Pro Bowl, his first since 2013, as a result of his successful 2016 season and was named First-team All-Pro for the second time in his career.[15]

In 2017, Tucker converted 34 of 37 field goals and was a perfect 39-for-39 on extra points. He was named second-team All-Pro for the 2017 season.

In Week 3 of the 2018 season, Tucker made two 50+ yard field goals and three extra points in a 27-14 win over the Denver Broncos, earning him AFC Special Teams Player of the Week.[16] He was later named the AFC Special Teams Player of the Month for September.[17] On October 21, 2018, Justin Tucker missed his first ever career PAT against the New Orleans Saints with 24 seconds left in the game, resulting in a 23-24 loss in a game that would have otherwise gone to overtime. In Week 17, Tucker converted all four field goals and two extra point attempts in a 26-24 win over the Cleveland Browns, earning him AFC Special Teams Player of the Week.[18]

Ravens franchise records

  • Most field goals in a single season – 38 (2013, 2016)
  • Most points scored in a single season – 141 (2016)
  • Most field goals in a single game – 6 vs. Detroit Lions (2013)
  • Longest field goal – 61 yards vs. Detroit Lions (2013)

NFL records

  • Most accurate kicker in NFL history (min. 100 attempts)
  • Longest field goal in a domed stadium – 61 yards vs. Detroit Lions (2013)
  • First NFL kicker to kick a field goal in the 20s, 30s, 40s, 50s, and 60s in the same game
  • First NFL kicker to kick three 50+ yard field goals in one half (2016)
  • Most 50+ yard field goals in one game – 3 (2016) (tied)
  • Most 50+ yard field goals in one season – 10 (2016) (tied)

Career statistics

Regular season
Denotes Super Bowl–winning season
Led the league
General Field Goals PATs Kickoffs Points
Season Team GP FGM FGA FG% Blck Long XPM XPA XP% KO Avg TBs Pts
2012 BAL 16 30 33 90.9% 0 56 42 42 100.0% 88 67.5 49 132
2013 BAL 16 38 41 92.7% 0 61 26 26 100.0% 82 63.4 42 140
2014 BAL 16 29 34 85.3% 1 55 42 42 100.0% 88 64.8 60 129
2015 BAL 16 33 40 82.5% 0 52 29 29 100.0% 74 64.2 63 128
2016 BAL 16 38 39 97.4% 1 57 27 27 100.0% 80 63.4 52 141
2017 BAL 16 34 37 91.9% 1 57 39 39 100.0% 90 62.3 55 141
2018 BAL 16 35 39 89.7% 2 56 36 37 97.3% 92 63.0 58 141
Career 95 237 263 90.1% 5 61 241 242 99.6% 594 64.1 379 952

Personal life

Tucker is a devout Catholic and makes the sign of the cross before every kick.[19][20] Tucker is also a classically trained bass-baritone, and in the past has been asked by both the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra and New York Opera for performances, although was unable to comply.[21] In 2015, Tucker was contracted by Royal Farms to sing in their line of commercials.[22] Even more recently, Tucker sang "Ave Maria" for a Catholic Charities benefit concert with the Concert Artists of Baltimore.[21] His opera talents also led Tucker through to the finals of the Most Valuable Performer, a talent show featuring talent performances of NFL players, where he won thanks to his rendition of Ave Maria. As a result of his victory, he received a ring and won $50,000 for his charity through the Baltimore School for the Arts. He also revealed that he has a real estate license.[23]

Tucker married Amanda Bass in March 2015, after meeting in college and dating for 6 years.[24] Their first child, Easton, was born on May 10, 2016.[25]

References

  1. ^ "NFL Field Goal % Career Leaders". Pro Football Reference. Sports Reference. Retrieved November 28, 2017.
  2. ^ NFL Baltimore Ravens Player Profile at NFL.com. Retrieved November 1, 2012.
  3. ^ "Texas tops Texas A&M in thriller". USA Today. Retrieved January 3, 2015.
  4. ^ "Justin Tucker's Lovable Weirdness". BaltimoreRavens.com. Retrieved December 13, 2015.
  5. ^ Mink, Ryan (May 29, 2012). "Ravens officially sign kicker Justin Tucker". BaltimoreRavens.com. Retrieved August 27, 2012.
  6. ^ "Ravens release Kicker Billy Cundiff in favor of rookie Justin Tucker". Bloomberg News. The Times-Picayune. August 27, 2012. Archived from the original on December 27, 2013. Retrieved August 27, 2012.
  7. ^ Maese, Rick (January 12, 2013). "Ravens vs. Broncos: Baltimore reaches AFC title game after Justin Tucker's field goal wins it in double overtime". The Washington Post. Retrieved January 14, 2013.
  8. ^ "Super Bowl XLVII - San Francisco 49ers vs. Baltimore Ravens - February 3rd, 2013". Pro-Football-Reference.com. Retrieved November 8, 2017.
  9. ^ Zrebiec, Jeff (December 17, 2013). "Justin Tucker's 61-yard field goal lifts Ravens to 18-16 win over Detroit Lions". The Baltimore Sun.
  10. ^ Profile, nfl.com; accessed January 3, 2015.
  11. ^ Hensley, Jamison (February 26, 2016). "Justin Tucker to make $4.5 million under franchise tag". ESPN.com. Retrieved March 6, 2016.
  12. ^ Sessler, Marc (March 4, 2016). "Justin Tucker signs franchise tender with Ravens". NFL.com. Retrieved March 6, 2016.
  13. ^ Mink, Ryan (July 15, 2016). "Justin Tucker Signs Four-Year Contract Extension". BaltimoreRavens.com. Retrieved April 9, 2017.
  14. ^ Ortega, Mark E. (November 30, 2016). "Ingram, Mack among NFL Players of the Week". NFL.com.
  15. ^ "Three rookies, Matt Ryan among players named to All-Pro team". NFL.com. January 6, 2017.
  16. ^ Bergman, Jeremy (September 26, 2018). "Big Ben, Drew Brees among NFL Players of the Week". NFL.com.
  17. ^ "Khalil Mack, J.J. Watt among Players of the Month". NFL.com. October 4, 2018.
  18. ^ Maya, Adam (January 2, 2019). "Josh Allen, Darius Leonard among Players of the Week". NFL.com.
  19. ^ Ravens rookie talks faith and football by Jennifer Williams, Catholic Review; retrieved October 31, 2012.
  20. ^ [1], ncregister.com; accessed January 3, 2015.
  21. ^ a b "Baltimore Ravens kicker Justin Tucker shows off vocals". UPI. Retrieved December 13, 2015.
  22. ^ "Ravens kicker Justin Tucker sings opera in Royal Farms commercial, becoming Peyton Manning". baltimoresun.com. Retrieved December 13, 2015.
  23. ^ NFL Films, Justin Tucker: The Opera Singing Kicker | NFL Films, retrieved 2019-01-22
  24. ^ "Amanda Bass Tucker - NFL Justin Tucker's Wife". October 2, 2015.
  25. ^ "Wife of Ravens kicker Justin Tucker has baby boy".

External links

2010 Texas Longhorns football team

The 2010 Texas Longhorns football team (variously "Texas", "UT", the "Longhorns", or the "'Horns") represented the University of Texas at Austin in the 2010 NCAA Division I FBS football season. The team was coached by Mack Brown, in his 13th year at Texas. Longhorns played their home games in Darrell K Royal–Texas Memorial Stadium and are members of the south division of the Big 12 Conference. Texas finished the season 5–7, 2–6 in Big 12 play. It was the Longhorns' first losing season since 1997.

2011 Baylor Bears football team

The 2011 Baylor Bears football team represented Baylor University in the 2011 NCAA Division I FBS football season. The team was coached by Art Briles and played their home games at Floyd Casey Stadium in Waco, Texas. They are members of the Big 12 Conference. They finished the season 10–3, 6–3 in Big 12 play to finish in a tie for third place with Oklahoma (whom they defeated during the season). The ten wins tied a school record for wins in a season while the 6–3 conference record is its best since joining the Big 12. They were invited to the Alamo Bowl where they beat Washington, 67–56, for their first bowl win since the 1992 John Hancock Bowl.

Junior starting quarterback Robert Griffin III won the Heisman Trophy, becoming the first Baylor player to win the award.

2011 Holiday Bowl

The 2011 Bridgepoint Education Holiday Bowl, the 34th edition of the game, was a postseason American college football bowl game between the Texas Longhorns of the Big 12 Conference and the California Golden Bears of the Pac-12 Conference (Pac-12), on December 28, 2011, at Qualcomm Stadium in San Diego, California. The game was the final contest of the 2011 NCAA Division I-Football Bowl Subdivision (Division I-FBS) football season for both teams, and it ended in a 21–10 victory for Texas.

Texas was selected to play in the 2011 Holiday Bowl following a 7–5 regular season that included a last-second victory at Texas A&M and double-digit losses to then-No. 1 Oklahoma, then-No. 7 Oklahoma State, and then-No. 18 Baylor. The Longhorns faced California, who also had an identical 7–5 regular season, highlighted by an overtime victory at Colorado and a 3-point loss to then-No. 8 Stanford.

California scored the only points of the first quarter on a 49-yard field goal by placekicker Giorgio Tavecchio. In the second quarter Texas' placekicker Justin Tucker missed a 38-yard field goal but were later able to score on a 4-yard reverse pass touchdown reception by wide receiver Jaxon Shipley. California answered in the third quarter on a touchdown run by running-back Isi Sofele, but the Golden Bears would not score any more points afterwards. Texas scored later in the third quarter on a 47-yard reception by wide receiver Marquise Goodwin and in the fourth quarter on a 4-yard run by running-back Cody Johnson to end the game.

Texas quarterback David Ash was named player of the game, and finished with 142 passing yards and one touchdown while also attaining a touchdown reception. Texas linebacker Keenan Robinson was named the defensive MVP after finishing with eight tackles and a pass deflection.

2011 Texas Longhorns football team

The 2011 Texas Longhorns football team (variously "Texas," "UT," the "Longhorns," or the "'Horns") represented the University of Texas at Austin in the 2011 NCAA Division I FBS football season. The Longhorns were led by 14th year head coach Mack Brown and played their home games at Darrell K Royal–Texas Memorial Stadium. They are a member of the Big 12 Conference. They finished the season 8–5, 4–5 in Big 12 play to finish in a tie for sixth place improving on their disastrous 5–7 season from 2010. They were invited to the Holiday Bowl where they defeated California 21–10.

2012 San Francisco 49ers season

The 2012 San Francisco 49ers season was the franchise's 63rd season in the National Football League, the 67th overall, the second under the head coach/general manager tandem of Jim Harbaugh and Trent Baalke, and their penultimate season at Candlestick Park. After going 13–3 and reaching the NFC Championship the year before, the 49ers topped that success with their first NFC championship since 1994 as well as their sixth overall as a franchise, overcoming a 17–0 deficit to defeat the Atlanta Falcons 28–24 on January 20, 2013 in the NFC title game. However, the season ended with their first-ever defeat in the Super Bowl, falling to the Baltimore Ravens, 34-31. With that game, the Ravens replaced the 49ers as the only team with multiple appearances to never lose a Super Bowl.

2012–13 NFL playoffs

The National Football League playoffs for the 2012 season began on January 5, 2013. The postseason tournament concluded with the Baltimore Ravens defeating the San Francisco 49ers in Super Bowl XLVII, 34–31, on February 3, at Mercedes-Benz Superdome in New Orleans, Louisiana.All teams in both conferences won at least 10 games, the first time since 2005.

Unless otherwise noted, all times listed are Eastern Standard Time (UTC-05)

2013 All-Pro Team

The 2013 All-Pro Teams were named by the Associated Press (AP) the Pro Football Writers of America (PFWA), and the Sporting News (SN) for performance in the 2013 NFL season. While none of the All-Pro teams have the official imprimatur of the NFL (whose official recognition is nomination to the 2014 Pro Bowl), they are included in the NFL Record and Fact Book. Any player selected to any of the teams can be described as an "All-Pro". The AP team, with first-team and second-team selections, was chosen by a national panel of fifty NFL writers. The Sporting News All-NFL team is voted on by NFL players and executives and was released January 28, 2014. The PFWA team is selected by its more than 300 national members who are accredited media members covering the NFL.

2013 Baltimore Ravens season

The 2013 Baltimore Ravens season was the franchise's 18th season in the National Football League and the sixth under head coach John Harbaugh. The Ravens entered the season as the defending Super Bowl champions from the previous year, but failed to improve on their 10–6 record from 2012, and missed the playoffs for the first time since 2007. For the first time in franchise history, Ray Lewis was not on the roster, as he announced his retirement before the playoffs began the year prior. He retired as a champion of Super Bowl XLVII and was the last remaining player from the team’s inaugural season. Lewis also helped the Ravens win Super Bowl XXXV over the New York Giants and is believed by many as the greatest Baltimore Raven of all time. Including Lewis, the team parted ways with a record eight starters from the Super Bowl-winning squad; no other defending Super Bowl champion had lost more than five.

2014–15 NFL playoffs

The National Football League playoffs for the 2014 season began on January 3, 2015. The postseason tournament concluded with the New England Patriots defeating the Seattle Seahawks in Super Bowl XLIX, 28–24, on February 1, at University of Phoenix Stadium in Glendale, Arizona.

2015 Baltimore Ravens season

The 2015 Baltimore Ravens season was the franchise's 20th season in the National Football League (NFL) and the eighth under head coach John Harbaugh. Although picked by some, including Sports Illustrated's Peter King, to reach the Super Bowl, they had a disappointing season in part due to injuries. 14 of their games were decided by 8 points or less and Joe Flacco, Justin Forsett, Steve Smith, Sr., and Terrell Suggs all suffered season ending injuries. They were eliminated from playoff contention in Week 14 with a loss to the Seattle Seahawks, in which they also suffered their ninth loss, resulting their first losing season in the Harbaugh–Flacco era and first since the collapse of the Brian Billick era. Ultimately the Ravens finished with a 5–11 record and twenty-two players ended the season on Injured Reserve. The 5-11 record is their worst since the 2007 season.

2016 Baltimore Ravens season

The 2016 season was the Baltimore Ravens' 21st season in the National Football League and the ninth under head coach John Harbaugh. With a week 12 win over the Cincinnati Bengals, the Ravens improved upon their 5–11 record from 2015, finishing the season 8–8. Despite the improvement, the Ravens failed to qualify for the playoffs for the second consecutive year after losing to the Steelers in Week 16. It was the first time the Ravens missed the playoffs in consecutive seasons since 2004–2005, and their first consecutive non-winning seasons since 1996–1999. They did, however, improve their position in the division, finishing in second place after finishing in third place for the previous three seasons.

2017 All-Pro Team

The 2017 All-Pro teams were named by the Associated Press (AP), Pro Football Writers of America (PFWA), and Sporting News (SN) for performance in the 2017 NFL season. While none of the All-Pro teams have the official imprimatur of the NFL (whose official recognition is nomination to the 2018 Pro Bowl), they are included in the NFL Record and Fact Book and also part of the language of the 2011 NFLPA Collective Bargaining Agreement. Any player selected to the first-team of any of the teams can be described as an "All-Pro." The AP team, with first-team and second-team selections, was chosen by a national panel of fifty NFL writers and broadcasters. The Sporting News All-NFL team is voted on by NFL players and executives and will be released at a later date. The PFWA team is selected by its more than 300 national members who are accredited media members covering the NFL.

2017 Baltimore Ravens season

The 2017 season was the Baltimore Ravens' 22nd in the National Football League and their 10th under head coach John Harbaugh. This was also the 10th season with Joe Flacco as the team's starting quarterback. The Ravens improved on the previous season's 8–8 record, but failed to qualify for the playoffs for the third consecutive season by a last second touchdown in a 31–27 loss to the Bengals in Week 17.

2017 Pro Bowl

The 2017 Pro Bowl (branded as the 2017 Pro Bowl presented by Aquafina for sponsorship reasons) was the National Football League's all-star game for the 2016 season, which was played at Camping World Stadium in Orlando, Florida on January 29, 2017. The game was the first in a three-year deal to host the Pro Bowl in Orlando, which also included cross-promotional events (such as a newly-established skills competition) held at the Walt Disney World Resort (which is owned by the primary parent company of the game's broadcaster, ESPN).

After three years of using a draft format, the 2017 Pro Bowl returned to the previous conference-based format, played between all-star teams representing the American Football Conference and National Football Conference. The AFC all-stars were coached by Andy Reid, and the NFC all-stars were coached by Jason Garrett.

Baltimore Ravens

The Baltimore Ravens are a professional American football team based in Baltimore, Maryland. The Ravens compete in the National Football League (NFL) as a member club of the American Football Conference (AFC) North division. The team plays its home games at M&T Bank Stadium and is headquartered in Owings Mills.The Ravens were established in 1996, after Art Modell, who was then the owner of the Cleveland Browns, announced plans to relocate the franchise from Cleveland to Baltimore in 1995. As part of a settlement between the league and the city of Cleveland, Modell was required to leave the Browns' history and records in Cleveland for a replacement team and replacement personnel that would take control in 1999. In return, he was allowed to take his own personnel and team to Baltimore, where such personnel would then form an expansion team.

The Ravens have qualified for the NFL playoffs eleven times since 2000, with two Super Bowl victories (Super Bowl XXXV and Super Bowl XLVII), two AFC Championship titles (2000 and 2012), 15 playoff victories, four AFC Championship game appearances (2000, 2008, 2011 and 2012), five AFC North division titles (2003, 2006, 2011, 2012, and 2018), and are currently the only team in the NFL to hold a perfect record in multiple Super Bowl appearances. The Ravens organization was led by general manager Ozzie Newsome from 1996 until his retirement following the 2018 season, and has had three head coaches: Ted Marchibroda, Brian Billick, and John Harbaugh. With a record-breaking defensive unit in their 2000 season, the team established a reputation for relying on strong defensive play, led by players like middle linebacker Ray Lewis, who, until his retirement, was considered the "face of the franchise." The team is owned by Steve Bisciotti and valued at $2.5 billion, making the Ravens the 27th-most valuable sports franchise in the world.

Mile High Miracle

The Mile High Miracle is both the NFL 2012 AFC Divisional playoff game between the Baltimore Ravens and Denver Broncos on January 12, 2013, and its defining play, a game-tying 70-yard touchdown pass from Baltimore quarterback Joe Flacco to receiver Jacoby Jones with under a minute left in regulation. Playing on the road against the heavily favored Broncos, who had decisively defeated the struggling Ravens late in the regular season while on an 11-game winning streak, Flacco and the Ravens forced the Peyton Manning-led Broncos into double overtime, when Justin Tucker kicked a 47-yard field goal to secure a 38–35 win. With 28 points scored in the first eleven minutes of the game, three return touchdowns, five lead changes, and single-digit temperatures, the game was described by Sports Illustrated as "one of the most exciting and entertaining postseason games in NFL history." The Ravens would go on to beat the New England Patriots, and two weeks later, defeat the San Francisco 49ers in Super Bowl XLVII for the franchise's second championship.

The Mile High Miracle was ranked #1 on NFL.com's Top 20 NFL Games of 2012. The game was described as "a contest that had everything: two special teams touchdowns, two bombs for scores and a pick-six – all without disintegrating into one of those nobody-can-stop-anybody affairs. The defenses did not play poorly; this was not a track meet. It had some balance."

Randy Brown (politician)

Randy Scott Brown (born July 30, 1967) is an American politician who is the Former Mayor of Evesham Township. Brown is also a National Football League kicking consultant for the Baltimore Ravens. Prior to consulting for the Baltimore Ravens, Brown served as a kicking coach for the Chicago Bears and the Philadelphia Eagles. Brown has been succeeded by Jaclyn Veasy.

Robbie Gould

Robert Paul Gould III (; born December 6, 1982) is an American football placekicker for the San Francisco 49ers of the National Football League (NFL). He played with the Chicago Bears from 2005 to 2015, during which he became the franchise's all-time leading scorer. Gould was originally signed by the New England Patriots as an undrafted free agent in 2005. He played college football at Penn State. Gould is the second most accurate kicker in NFL History, only behind Justin Tucker of the Baltimore Ravens.

Texas Longhorns football statistical leaders

The Texas Longhorns football statistical leaders are individual statistical leaders of the Texas Longhorns football program in various categories, including passing, rushing, receiving, total offense, defensive stats, and kicking. Within those areas, the lists identify single-game, single-season, and career leaders. The Longhorns represent the University of Texas in the NCAA's Big 12 Conference.

Although Texas began competing in intercollegiate football in 1893, the school's official record book considers the "modern era" to have begun in 1950. Records from before this year are often incomplete and inconsistent, and they are generally not included in these lists.

These lists are dominated by more recent players for several reasons:

Since 1950, seasons have increased from 10 games to 11 and then 12 games in length.

The NCAA didn't allow freshmen to play varsity football until 1972 (with the exception of the World War II years), allowing players to have four-year careers.

Bowl games only began counting toward single-season and career statistics in 2002. The Longhorns have played in a bowl game in all but one season since then, allowing players to have an additional game to accumulate statistics.

Similarly, the Longhorns have played in the Big 12 Championship Game (1996–2010, 2017–present) six times, providing yet another game for players in those seasons.

All of the Longhorns' 10 highest seasons in points scored, and all but one of the top 10 seasons in offensive yards, came under former head coach Mack Brown, who coached Texas from 1998 through 2013.These lists are updated through the 2018 Big 12 Championship Game.

Baltimore Ravens current roster
Active roster
Free agents

This page is based on a Wikipedia article written by authors (here).
Text is available under the CC BY-SA 3.0 license; additional terms may apply.
Images, videos and audio are available under their respective licenses.