Justin Harrell

Justin Tyrell Harrell (born February 14, 1984) is a former American football player. He was drafted by the Green Bay Packers 16th overall in the 2007 NFL Draft and would be a part of their Super Bowl XLV championship against the Pittsburgh Steelers. He played college football at Tennessee.

Justin Harrell
refer to caption
Harrell warming up in 2007
No. 91
Position:Defensive tackle
Personal information
Born:February 14, 1984 (age 35)
Martin, Tennessee
Height:6 ft 4 in (1.93 m)
Weight:315 lb (143 kg)
Career information
High school:Martin (TN) Westview
College:Tennessee
NFL Draft:2007 / Round: 1 / Pick: 16
Career history
Career highlights and awards
Career NFL statistics
Total tackles:28
Sacks:0.0
Forced fumbles:0
Fumble recoveries:0
Player stats at NFL.com

Early years

Harrell was named the 2A Mr. Football in Tennessee and was named All-American by PrepStar recruiting service. During his senior season at tight end he caught 18 passes for 354 yards and six touchdowns. Harrell attended Westview High School in Martin, Tennessee where his team was a state runner-up his senior year. He started three years in basketball and averaged 17 points per game. He also started all four years in football.

Professional career

Green Bay Packers

At the 2007 NFL draft he was selected 16th overall by the Green Bay Packers. He was the second defensive tackle taken in the draft after Amobi Okoye (Texans).

Harrell took part in only limited drills with the Packers in their organized team activities (OTA) practices as a result of the torn biceps tendon suffered while playing for Tennessee. Harrell was cleared to practice with the team at the preseason camp which began July 28. Harrell immediately drew criticism for showing up to OTA and Training Camp his rookie season out of shape and slightly overweight.

On July 27, 2007 Harrell signed a six-year contract with the Packers. The deal reportedly had a maximum value of just under $15 million with approximately $8 million guaranteed. Harrell played in his first NFL game on October 7, 2007 against the Chicago Bears in Week 5.

Harrell spent 2008 training camp on the Active/Physically Unable to Perform (PUP) list. On August 25, he was placed on the Reserve/PUP list, forcing him to miss the first six weeks of the regular season. He was activated on November 1 after defensive end Kabeer Gbaja-Biamila was released. On August 4, 2009, Harrell again injured his back during training camp practice and was inactive for the entire 2009 season.

In the season opener of the 2010 football season, Harrell suffered a torn ACL[1] and was placed on Injured Reserve, ending his season.

As of the conclusion of the 2010 season, Harrell had participated in just 14 regular season games over four seasons. He was released on July 28, 2011.[2]

References

  1. ^ "Packers: Ryan Grant has 'significant' ankle injury; Justin Harrell to IR". USA Today. September 13, 2010.
  2. ^ Rosenthal, Gregg. "Release Tracker". Pro Football Talk. Retrieved July 29, 2011.

External links

2005 All-SEC football team

The 2005 All-SEC football team consists of American football players selected to the All-Southeastern Conference (SEC) chosen by the Associated Press (AP) and the conference coaches for the 2005 NCAA Division I-A football season.

The Georgia Bulldogs won the conference, beating the LSU Tigers 34 to 14 in the SEC Championship.

Vanderbilt quarterback Jay Cutler was voted AP SEC Offensive Player of the Year. Alabama linebacker Demeco Ryans, a unanimous selection by both AP and the coaches, was voted AP SEC Defensive Player of the Year.

2005 Cotton Bowl Classic

The 2005 Cotton Bowl Classic was a post-season college football bowl game between the 2004 Tennessee Volunteers football team and the Texas A&M Aggies on January 1, 2005, at the Cotton Bowl in Dallas, Texas. It was the final game of the 2004 NCAA Division I FBS football season for each team and resulted in a 38-7 Tennessee victory. Tennessee represented the Southeastern Conference (SEC) while Texas A&M represented the Big 12 Conference.

2006 Tennessee Volunteers football team

The 2006 Tennessee Volunteers football team represented the University of Tennessee in the 2006 NCAA Division I FBS football season. Tennessee entered the 2006 season coming off a 5–6 record (3–5 SEC) in 2005. The Volunteers were given a preseason ranking of #23 in both the Coaches' Poll and the AP Poll.

Led by head coach Phillip Fulmer, the Volunteers played their home games at Neyland Stadium. The 2006 season saw a turnaround from the previous years losing record. The Vols added four wins from the total of the previous season. Also notable was the breakout year turned in by wide receiver Robert Meachem who broke the single season school record for receiving yards.

2007 Green Bay Packers season

The 2007 Green Bay Packers season was the franchise's 89th overall and 87th season in the National Football League. The Packers finished the regular season with an impressive 13–3 record. They received a bye for the first round of the playoffs, won their divisional round playoff game, and lost in the NFC Championship game to the eventual Super Bowl champion New York Giants. This was the last season for quarterback Brett Favre as a Green Bay Packer.

This season also marked the 50th anniversary of the opening of the Packers' home stadium of Lambeau Field. The Packers' tenure at Lambeau, now at 59 seasons, is the longest in NFL history at a single stadium, breaking the Chicago Bears' previous record of 50 seasons at Wrigley Field (1921–1970).

2007 NFL Draft

The 2007 National Football League draft took place at Radio City Music Hall in New York City, New York, on April 28 and April 29, 2007. The draft was televised for the 28th consecutive year on ESPN and ESPN2. The NFL Network also broadcast coverage of the event, its second year doing so. There were 255 draft selections: 223 regular selections (instead of the typical 224) and 32 compensatory selections. A supplemental draft was also held after the regular draft and before the regular season. This was the first draft presided over by new NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell.

The first round was the longest in the history of the NFL draft, lasting six hours, eight minutes. One of the big stories of the draft was the fall of Notre Dame quarterback Brady Quinn. Quinn had been projected as a potential first overall pick in early mock drafts and had been invited to attend the draft in person, but he wasn't selected until the 22nd pick in the first round by the Cleveland Browns, who acquired the pick in a trade with the Dallas Cowboys. Louisiana State University quarterback JaMarcus Russell was selected first overall by the Oakland Raiders after he had replaced Quinn as the projected first selection among most analysts following his performance in the 2007 Sugar Bowl against Quinn and Notre Dame. Russell is considered by many as one of the biggest draft busts in NFL history, and Quinn also had a largely unsuccessful pro career.Those selections notwithstanding, Bleacher Report named the 2007 draft class the "greatest draft class in the last 25 years" in 2012 due to the heavy volume of reliable starters, as well as players selected that are now widely regarded as future Hall of Famers, such as Patrick Willis, Darrelle Revis, and Marshal Yanda; first round selections Calvin Johnson, Joe Thomas, and Adrian Peterson are widely regarded as being among the greatest to ever play at their respective positions.

2008 Green Bay Packers season

The 2008 Green Bay Packers season was the 90th season overall and 88th in the National Football League. They looked to continue success after posting a 13–3 record in 2007, but they failed to do so and finished the season with a losing 6–10 record. Until the 2017 season, this was the last season in which the Packers did not qualify for the playoffs.

2010 Green Bay Packers season

The 2010 Green Bay Packers season was the 92nd season overall and their 90th season in the National Football League. Although they finished with only a respectable 10–6 record, good for a second-place finish in the NFC North, the Packers never lost a game by more than four points, and never trailed by more than seven the entire season, becoming the only team since the AFL-NFL merger in 1970 to accomplish this. All six of their regular season losses were by a combined 20 points. They entered the playoffs as the NFC's sixth seed. After defeating the Philadelphia Eagles 21–16 in the Wild Card round, the Atlanta Falcons 48–21 in the Divisional round and long time rivals, Chicago Bears 21–14 in the NFC Championship, the team advanced to Super Bowl XLV in which they faced the AFC's 2nd seed Pittsburgh Steelers. The Packers defeated the Steelers 31–25 to win their fourth Super Bowl and 13th NFL championship. The Packers became the second overall team after the 2005 Pittsburgh Steelers, and the first NFC team, to win the Super Bowl as a sixth seed, as well as becoming the second NFC team to win three straight road playoff games (the 2007 New York Giants won three straight road games as a five seed).

The Packers offense ranked ninth in yards per game, tenth in total points, & fifth in passing yards. The defense ranked fifth in yards allowed and finished second in fewest points allowed (240, second best in team history), sacks (47), and interceptions (24), while also limiting quarterbacks to a 67.2 passer rating, first in the league.

Jarius Wynn

Jarius Jessereel Wynn (born August 29, 1986) is an American football defensive end who is currently a free agent. He was drafted by the Green Bay Packers in the sixth round (182nd overall) of the 2009 NFL Draft. He won a Super Bowl ring in Super Bowl XLV over the Pittsburgh Steelers. He played college football at Georgia.

Wynn has also played for the Tennessee Titans, San Diego Chargers. Dallas Cowboys and Buffalo Bills.

Kabeer Gbaja-Biamila

Muhammed-Kabeer Olanrewaju Gbaja-Biamila (; born September 24, 1977), nicknamed "KGB", is a former American football defensive end who played nine seasons in the National Football League (NFL). He played college football at San Diego State. He was drafted by the Green Bay Packers in the fifth round of the 2000 NFL Draft, and played his entire career for the Packers. He was a Pro Bowl selection in 2003.

List of Green Bay Packers first-round draft picks

The Green Bay Packers joined the National Football League (NFL) in 1921, two years after their original founding by Curly Lambeau. They participated in the first ever NFL draft in 1936 and selected Russ Letlow, a guard from the University of San Francisco. The team's most recent first round selection was Jaire Alexander, a cornerback from Louisville in the 2018 NFL Draft. The Packers have selected the number one overall pick in the draft twice, choosing future Hall of Fame halfback Paul Hornung in 1957 and quarterback Randy Duncan in 1959. They have also selected the second overall pick three times and the third overall pick once. The team's eight selections from the University of Minnesota are the most chosen by the Packers from one university.

Every year during April, each NFL franchise seeks to add new players to its roster through a collegiate draft officially known as "the NFL Annual Player Selection Meeting" but more commonly known as the NFL Draft. Teams are ranked in inverse order based on the previous season's record, with the worst record picking first, and the second worst picking second and so on. The two exceptions to this order are made for teams that appeared in the previous Super Bowl; the Super Bowl champion always picks 32nd, and the Super Bowl loser always picks 31st. Playoff teams will not pick before a non playoff team when determining the initial draft order. So a division winner with a losing record would have a lower pick after a 10-6 team that didn't make the playoffs. Teams have the option of trading away their picks to other teams for different picks, players, cash, or a combination thereof. Thus, it is not uncommon for a team's actual draft pick to differ from their assigned draft pick, or for a team to have extra or no draft picks in any round due to these trades.

List of Green Bay Packers players

The following is a list of notable past or present players of the Green Bay Packers professional American football team.

List of Tennessee Volunteers in the NFL Draft

This is a list of Tennessee Volunteers selected in the NFL Draft.

Martin, Tennessee

Martin is a city in Weakley County, Tennessee, United States. Martin, Tennessee is named for Captain William Martin. William Martin was born in Halifax County, Virginia in 1806, and moved to Weakley County, Tennessee with his wife Sarah in 1832. Captain Martin prospered through tobacco farming and began working to establish a railroad connection in what would later become Martin in 1852. It was not until after his death in 1859 that his sons, led primarily by George W. Martin, persuaded the Mississippi Central Railroad to locate a connection with the Nashville and Northwestern Railroad in what would become Martin, Tennessee in 1872. Martin is the home of the University of Tennessee at Martin. The population was 11,473 at the 2010 census.

Montori Hughes

Montori Hughes (born August 25, 1990) is an American football nose tackle for the Memphis Express of the Alliance of American Football (AAF). He played college football at University of Tennessee at Martin, and was selected in the fifth round of the 2013 NFL Draft by the Indianapolis Colts. He has also been a member of the New York Giants, Kansas City Chiefs, and Washington Redskins.

Ted Thompson

Ted Thompson (born January 17, 1953) is an American football executive for the Green Bay Packers and former player. He was the general manager of the Green Bay Packers of the National Football League (NFL) from 2005 to 2017. He was named to the post on January 14, 2005, by former Packers president and CEO Bob Harlan. Thompson took over the general manager duties from Mike Sherman, who had been serving as both head coach and general manager. Prior to becoming the Packers' general manager, Thompson served with the Seattle Seahawks as their vice president of operations from 2000 to 2004. Thompson had previously worked for the Packers organization from 1992 to 1999, serving as their assistant director of pro personnel in 1992, their director of pro personnel from 1993 to 1997, and their director of player personnel from 1997 to 1999. Thompson also had a 10-year playing career in the NFL as a linebacker and special teams player with the Houston Oilers from 1975 to 1984.

Tennessee Volunteers football

The Tennessee Volunteers football program (variously called "Tennessee", "Vols", "UT") represents the University of Tennessee (UT) in the sport of American football. The Volunteers compete in the Football Bowl Subdivision (FBS) of the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) and the Eastern Division of the Southeastern Conference (SEC).

The Vols have played football for 121 seasons, starting in 1891; their combined record of 833–383–53 ranks them twelfth on the list of all-time win-loss percentage records .677 and ninth on by-victories list for college football programs as well as second on the all-time win/loss list of SEC programs 390–253–33 .601. Their all-time ranking in bowl appearances is third (52) and sixth in all-time bowl victories (28), most notably four Sugar Bowls, three Cotton Bowls, an Orange Bowl, and a Fiesta Bowl. They have won 16 conference championships and six national titles in their history and their last national championship was in the 1998 college football season.

The Vols play at Neyland Stadium, where Tennessee has an all-time winning record of 464 games, the highest home-field total in college football history for any school in the nation at its current home venue. Additionally, its 102,455 seat capacity makes Neyland the nation's fifth largest stadium.

Westview High School (Tennessee)

Westview High School is a public high school in Martin, Tennessee, United States. It is part of the Weakley County school district. As of 2006, it has an enrollment of approximately 650 students. The current principal is Jeromy Davidson.

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