Justice League/Power Rangers

Justice League/Power Rangers was a 2017 comic book intercompany crossover series featuring DC Comics' Justice League and Saban's Power Rangers, written by Tom Taylor with art by Stephen Byrne, published by DC Comics and Boom Studios.[1][2][3]

Justice League/Power Rangers
Justiceleaguepowerrangers
Publication information
PublisherDC Comics
Boom Studios
FormatLimited series
Publication dateJanuary – September 2017
No. of issues6
Main character(s)Justice League
Mighty Morphin Power Rangers
Creative team
Written byTom Taylor
Artist(s)Stephen Byrne

Plot

Lord Zedd attacks the Command Center with an army of Putties and Zack arrives to defend it and Zordon. During his attempt to teleport them out, the teleportation relay is destroyed by a fake Alpha 5 with a bomb implanted in him. This causes the teleportation to malfunction and send Zack, Lord Zedd and the Putties to cross dimensions, where a "Dark" and familiar figure witnesses their arrival. The Power Rangers teleport to the same coordinates Zack went to and end up stranded in the DC Universe, a world where superpowered heroes are an everyday thing and villains are almost as powerful as the monsters that Rita and Zedd create.

Reception

The Justice League/Power Rangers comic received mostly positive critical reviews.[4][5][6]

References

  1. ^ Brown, Tracy. "Justice League and Power Rangers will meet in a crossover comic book series". Retrieved 20 January 2017 – via LA Times.
  2. ^ "JUSTICE LEAGUE/POWER RANGERS #1 Goes Back To Print, With New Cover". Retrieved 20 January 2017.
  3. ^ Whitbrook, James. "The Team Behind Justice League/Power Rangers Tells Us About the Joys of Crossovers (and Giant Mastodons)". Retrieved 20 January 2017.
  4. ^ Lake, Jeff (11 January 2017). "Justice League/Mighty Morphin Power Rangers #1 Review". Retrieved 20 January 2017.
  5. ^ "Justice League/Mighty Morphin Power Rangers #1 Gets A Nice New Cover For Its Second Print..." 18 January 2017. Retrieved 20 January 2017.
  6. ^ Lake, Jeff (8 February 2017). "Justice League/ Mighty Morphin Power Rangers #2 Review". Retrieved 27 February 2017.
Brainiac (character)

Brainiac is a fictional supervillain appearing in American comic books published by DC Comics, usually as an adversary of Superman, his second deadliest archenemy after Lex Luthor, and a frequent enemy of the Justice League.

Brainiac is typically depicted as an extraterrestrial cyborg or android. He is one of Superman's primary enemies, and is responsible for shrinking and stealing Kandor, the capital city of Superman's home planet Krypton. In some continuities, he is also responsible for Krypton's destruction. Due to multiple revisions of DC's continuity, several variations of Brainiac have appeared. Most incarnations of Brainiac depict him as a green-skinned being in humanoid form. He is bald, with a set of linked electrode-like objects (sometimes glowing) protruding from his skull.

His name is a portmanteau of the words brain and maniac. In 2009, Brainiac was ranked as IGN's 17th Greatest Comic Book Villain of All Time.

Intercompany crossover

In comic books, an intercompany crossover (also called cross-company or company crossover) is a comic or series of comics where characters that at the time of publication are the property of one company meet those owned by another company (for example, DC Comics' Superman meeting Marvel's Spider-Man, or DC's Batman meeting Marvel's Wolverine). These usually occur in "one-shot" issues or miniseries.

Some crossovers are part of canon. But most are outside of the continuity of a character's regular title or series of stories. They can be a joke, a gag, a dream sequence, or even a "what if" scenario (such as DC's Elseworlds).

Marvel/DC crossovers (which are mostly noncanon) include those where the characters live in alternate universes, as well as those where they share the "same" version of Earth. Some fans have posited a separate "Crossover Earth" for these adventures. In the earliest licensed crossovers, the companies seemed to prefer shared world adventures. This was the approach for early intercompany crossovers, including 1976's Superman vs. the Amazing Spider-Man and 1981's Superman and Spider-Man.

Besides the two Superman/Spider-Man crossovers, a number of other DC/Marvel adventures take place on a "Crossover Earth", but later intercompany crossovers tend to present the DC and Marvel Universes as alternate realities, bridged when common foes make this desirable, as the interest in overall continuity has become a major part of even crossover comic books.Characters are often licensed or sold from one company to another, as with DC acquiring such characters of Fawcett Comics, Quality Comics, and Charlton Comics as the original Captain Marvel, Plastic Man and Captain Atom. In this way, heroes originally published by different companies can become part of the same fictional universe, and interactions between such characters are no longer considered intercompany crossovers.

Although a meeting between a licensed character and a wholly owned character (e.g., between Red Sonja and Spider-Man, or Evil Dead's Ash Williams and the Marvel Zombies) is technically an intercompany crossover, comics companies rarely bill them as such. Likewise, this is the case when some characters in an ongoing series are owned or to some extent controlled by their creators, as with Doctor Who antagonists the Daleks, who are not owned by the UK television network the BBC, even though the character of The Doctor is.

JL8

JL8 is a webcomic by Yale Stewart based on the characters of DC Comics' Justice League. Having started in 2011 under the title Little League, the webcomic presents the members of the Justice League as 8-year-old children. Stewart has used JL8 to raise funds for charities, and the webcomic has been positively received by critics.

Justice League

The Justice League is a team of fictional superheroes appearing in American comic books published by DC Comics. The Justice League was conceived by writer Gardner Fox, and they first appeared together, as Justice League of America (JLA) in The Brave and the Bold #28 (March 1960).The Justice League is an assemblage of superheroes who join together as a team. The seven original members were Superman, Batman, Wonder Woman, The Flash, Green Lantern, Aquaman, and Martian Manhunter. The team roster has rotated throughout the years, consisting of various superheroes from the DC Universe, such as The Atom, Big Barda, Black Canary, Cyborg, Green Arrow, Elongated Man, the Flash/Wally West, Green Lantern/John Stewart, Hawkgirl, Hawkman, Metamorpho, Plastic Man, Power Girl, Orion, Red Tornado, Stargirl, Captain Marvel/Shazam, and Zatanna, among many others.

The team received its own comic book title called Justice League of America in November 1960. With the 2011 relaunch, DC Comics released a second volume of Justice League. In July 2016, the DC Rebirth initiative again relaunched the Justice League comic book titles with the third volume of Justice League. Since its inception, the team has been featured in various films, television programs, and video games.

List of DC Comics publications

DC Comics is one of the largest comic book publishers in North America. DC has published comic books under a number of different imprints and corporate names. This is a list of all series, mini-series, limited series, and comic book sized one-shots published under the imprints DC or AA, and published by National Periodical Publications, National Comics Publications, All-American Comics, Inc., National Allied Publications, Detective Comics, Inc., and related corporate names. The list does not include trade paperbacks or series that included only reprints of previously published material.

Marguerite Sauvage

Marguerite Sauvage is a French illustrator and scriptwriter. She has provided illustrations in press, publishing and advertising (Society of Illustrators 49th, American Illustration 26, American Illustration 28).

She is also a comic book artist on titles like Faith or Bombshells. She was nominated for the Eisner Award (2017), the Joe Shuster Award (2017), the GLAAD award (2017) and the Russ Maning Award (2016).

Power Rangers

Power Rangers is an American entertainment and merchandising franchise built around a live-action superhero television series, based on the Japanese tokusatsu franchise Super Sentai. Produced first by Saban Entertainment, second by BVS Entertainment, later by Saban Brands, and today by SCG Power Rangers and Hasbro, the Power Rangers television series takes much of its footage from the Super Sentai television series, produced by Toei Company. The first Power Rangers entry, Mighty Morphin Power Rangers, debuted on August 28, 1993, and helped launch the Fox Kids programming block of the 1990s, during which it catapulted into popular culture along with a line of action figures and other toys by Bandai. By 2001, the media franchise had generated over $6 billion in toy sales.Despite initial criticism that its action violence targeted child audiences, the franchise has continued, and as of 2019 the show consists of 26 television seasons of 20 different themed series and three theatrical films released in 1995, 1997 and 2017. In 2010, Haim Saban, creator of the series, regained ownership of the franchise after seven years under The Walt Disney Company.

In 2018, Hasbro was named the new master toy licensee. Shortly afterwards, Saban Brands and Hasbro announced that the latter would acquire the franchise and the rest of the former's entertainment assets in a $522 million deal, with the first products from Hasbro becoming available in early 2019.

Power Rangers (Boom! Studios)

Power Rangers is a comic book franchise distributed by Boom Studios. It is based on the television series of the same name. Originally licensed by Saban Brands in 2016, the rights were passed to Hasbro in 2018.

Power Rangers (comics)

Power Rangers is a series of various comic books spun off from the Power Rangers television show. Each series was published by a different comic book publisher.

Publication history of DC Comics crossover events

DC Comics has produced many crossover stories combining characters from different series of comics. Some of these are set in the fictional DC Universe, or any number of settings within the DC Multiverse.

Super Jrs.

Super Juniors are a group of fictional DC Comics characters based on members of the Justice League of America, designed as baby versions in order to appeal to younger audiences and introduce them to the publisher's most popular properties. At Kenner's request, first appeared in José Luis García-López's 1982 DC Comics Style Guide and had their first and only adventure in Super Jrs. Holiday Special: The Best of DC Blue Ribbon Digest #58 (March 1985) in a story written by Tom DeFalco and drawn by Vince Squeglia. There was a considerable amount of merchandise (toys, wallpapers, bed sheets and covers, furniture, flash cards, coloring books, etc.) based on them.

Characters include "Jr." versions of Superman (Super-Kid, Casey), Batman (Bat-Guy, Carlos) and Robin (Kid-Robin, the Shrimp), Wonder Woman (Wonder Tot, Deedee), Flash (Flash-Kid, Rembrandt), Green Arrow, Green Lantern, Hawkman, Aquaman and, later, Supergirl. In the Holiday Special, they are orphan youngsters from the Miss Piffle's Nursery School, transformed by the fairy spirit of Christmas into superheroes to stop the evil Wallace van Whealthy III, the Weather Wizard, a school bully super villain and rescue Santa Claus.

Tom Taylor (writer)

Tom Taylor (born 29 November 1978) is a #1 New York Times bestselling comic book author, playwright and screenwriter. He is best known for his work on the DC Comics series Injustice: Gods Among Us and Earth-Two, Marvel's All-New Wolverine, X-Men Red and Superior Iron Man and his many Star Wars works. He is the co-creator, head writer and Executive Producer of the CG animated series The Deep based on his graphic novel series of the same name.

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