Juniperus lutchuensis

Juniperus lutchuensis (Ryukyu Islands juniper; Japanese: オキナワハイネズ Okinawa-hainezu; syn. Juniperus taxifolia var. lutchuensis (Koidz.) Satake) is a species of juniper, native to the Ryukyu Islands, Izu Ōshima and the adjacent coast of Shizuoka Prefecture in Japan.[1][2]

Juniperus lutchuensis
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Plantae
Division: Pinophyta
Class: Pinopsida
Order: Pinales
Family: Cupressaceae
Genus: Juniperus
Species:
J. lutchuensis
Binomial name
Juniperus lutchuensis

Description

'Juniperus lutchuensis is an evergreen coniferous shrub growing to a height of 1–3 m. The leaves are needle-like, in whorls of three, light green, 7–14 mm long and 1-1.5 mm broad, with a double white stomatal band (split by a green midrib) on the inner surface. It is dioecious, with separate male and female plants.

The seed cones are berry-like, green ripening in 18 months to purple-brown; they are spherical, 8–9 mm diameter, and have three or six fused scales in one or two whorls of three; the three larger scales each bear a single seed. The seeds are dispersed when birds eat the cones, digesting the fleshy scales and passing the hard seeds in their droppings. The pollen cones are yellow, 5 mm long.[1]

Taxonomy

Some authors[3] treat it as a synonym of Juniperus taxifolia from the Bonin Islands, while others treat it as a variety of it, Juniperus taxifolia var. lutchuensis.[2] It is probably best considered a separate species as it has a distinct DNA profile clearly different from J. taxifolia.[1]

Conservation

Its conservation status is uncertain (Data Deficient) but it is rare and may become threatened.[1][2]

References

  1. ^ a b c d Adams, R. P. (2004). Junipers of the World. Trafford. ISBN 1-4120-4250-X
  2. ^ a b c Yasushi laboratory: Juniperus taxifolia var. lutchuensis (in Japanese; google translation)
  3. ^ Farjon, A. (2005). Monograph of Cupressaceae and Sciadopitys. Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew. ISBN 1-84246-068-4
Juniper

Junipers are coniferous trees and shrubs in the genus Juniperus of the cypress family Cupressaceae. Depending on taxonomic viewpoint, between 50 and 67 species of junipers are widely distributed throughout the Northern Hemisphere, from the Arctic, south to tropical Africa, from Ziarat, Pakistan, east to eastern Tibet in the Old World, and in the mountains of Central America. The highest-known juniper forest occurs at an altitude of 16,000 ft (4,900 m) in southeastern Tibet and the northern Himalayas, creating one of the highest tree-lines on earth.

Juniperus taxifolia

Juniperus taxifolia (Bonin Islands juniper; Japanese: シマムロ Shimamuro) is a species of juniper, endemic to the Bonin Islands southeast of Japan.It is an evergreen coniferous shrub growing to a height of 1–3 m (rarely a small tree to 13 m tall). The leaves are needle-like, in whorls of three, light green, 7–14 mm long and 1-1.5 mm broad, with a double white stomatal band (split by a green midrib) on the inner surface. It is dioecious, with separate male and female plants. The seed cones are berry-like, green ripening in 18 months to reddish-brown with a variable light waxy coating; they are spherical, 8–10 mm diameter, and have six or nine fused scales in two or three whorls of three; the three larger scales each with a single seed. The seeds are dispersed when birds eat the cones, digesting the fleshy scales and passing the hard seeds in their droppings. The pollen cones are yellow, 5 mm long.Some authors include Juniperus lutchuensis from the Ryukyu Islands in J. taxifolia as a synonym, or variety, while others treat it as a distinct species as it has a distinct DNA profile.Its conservation status, previously given as Data Deficient, is now listed as Vulnerable.

Languages

This page is based on a Wikipedia article written by authors (here).
Text is available under the CC BY-SA 3.0 license; additional terms may apply.
Images, videos and audio are available under their respective licenses.