Junior Miller

Selvia Miller, Jr. (born November 26, 1957) is a former American college and professional football player who was a tight end in the national Football League (NFL) for five seasons during the 1980s. Miller played college football for the University of Nebraska, and earned All-American honors. He was selected in the first round of the 1980 NFL Draft, played professionally for the Atlanta Falcons and New Orleans Saints of the NFL, and was twice selected to the Pro Bowl.

Miller was born in Midland, Texas. He attended Robert E. Lee High School in Midland, and was a standout high school football player for the Lee Rebels.

He attended the University of Nebraska, where he played for coach Tom Osborne's Nebraska Cornhuskers football team from 1976 to 1979. As a senior in 1979, he was recognized as a consensus first-team All-American.

The Atlanta Falcons chose Miller in the first round (seventh pick overall) of the 1980 NFL Draft, and he played for the Falcons from 1980 to 1983. He was selected for the Pro Bowl in 1980 and 1981. Miller previously held the Atlanta Falcons' franchise record for most receiving touchdowns by a rookie with 9, it was broken in 2018 by Calvin Ridley who had 10. He played his fifth and final NFL season for the New Orleans Saints in 1984.

Junior Miller
No. 80, 84
Position:Tight end
Personal information
Born:November 26, 1957 (age 61)
Waco, Texas
Height:6 ft 4 in (1.93 m)
Weight:239 lb (108 kg)
Career information
High school:Midland (TX) Lee
College:Nebraska
NFL Draft:1980 / Round: 1 / Pick: 7
Career history
Career highlights and awards
Career NFL statistics
Receptions:122
Receiving yards:1,409
Touchdowns:14
Player stats at NFL.com
1976 Gwyn Staley 400

The 1976 Gwyn Staley 400 was a NASCAR Winston Cup Series stock car race held on April 4, 1976, at North Wilkesboro Speedway in North Wilkesboro, North Carolina. Contested over 400 laps, it was the seventh race of the 30-event 1976 season. Cale Yarborough of Junior Johnson Motorsports took his second win of the season, while Richard Petty finished second and Bobby Allison third. Benny Parsons left the event with the season points lead.

1977 Wilkes 400

The 1977 Wilkes 400 was a NASCAR Winston Cup Series racing event that was held on October 2, 1977, at North Wilkesboro Speedway in North Wilkesboro, North Carolina.

By 1980, NASCAR had completely stopped tracking the year model of all the vehicles and most teams did not take stock cars to the track under their own power anymore.

1978 Nebraska Cornhuskers football team

The 1978 Nebraska Cornhuskers football team represented the University of Nebraska–Lincoln in the 1978 NCAA Division I-A football season. The team was coached by Tom Osborne and played their home games in Memorial Stadium in Lincoln, Nebraska.

1979 All-Big Eight Conference football team

The 1979 All-Big Eight Conference football team consists of American football players chosen by various organizations for All-Big Eight Conference teams for the 1979 NCAA Division I-A football season. The selectors for the 1979 season included the Associated Press (AP).

1979 Nebraska Cornhuskers football team

The 1979 Nebraska Cornhuskers football team represented the University of Nebraska–Lincoln in the 1979 NCAA Division I-A football season. The team was coached by Tom Osborne and played their home games in Memorial Stadium in Lincoln, Nebraska.

1980 All-Pro Team

The 1980 All-Pro Team is composed of the National Football League players that were named to the Associated Press, Newspaper Enterprise Association, Pro Football Writers Association, Pro Football Weekly, and The Sporting News All-Pro Teams in 1980. Both first- and second- teams are listed for the AP and NEA teams. These are the five teams that are included in Total Football II: The Official Encyclopedia of the National Football League. Pro Football Weekly chose a nose tackle due to the proliferation of 3-4 defenses in the NFL. They, and The Sporting News chose two inside linebackers.

1980 Atlanta Falcons season

The 1980 Atlanta Falcons season was the Falcons 15th season and culminated in their first division title in franchise history. After a 3-3 start, the Falcons went on a nine-game winning streak as Quarterback Steve Bartkowski passed for a career best 3,544 yards while connecting on 31 Touchdown passes. As the NFC's top seed, the Falcons gained home-field advantage throughout the playoffs. The Falcons season ended with a 30-27 divisional playoff loss to the Dallas Cowboys before 60,022 fans at Fulton County Stadium. It was an excruciating defeat as Atlanta had leads of both 24-10 and 27-17 before falling to Danny White's TD pass to Drew Pearson in the final minute.

1980 Holly Farms 400

The 1980 Holly Farms 400 was a NASCAR Winston Cup Series racing event that took place on September 21, 1980, at North Wilkesboro Speedway in North Wilkesboro, North Carolina. Its total prize purse was finalized as $105,515 ($320,849 when adjusted for inflation); with the winner taking home $17,725 ($53,898 when adjusted for inflation).

By 1980, NASCAR had completely stopped tracking the year model of all the vehicles and most teams did not take stock cars to the track under their own power anymore.

1980 NASCAR Winston Cup Series

The 1980 NASCAR Winston Cup Series was the 32nd season of professional stock car racing in the United States and the 9th modern-era NASCAR Cup season. The season began on Sunday, January 13 and ended on Sunday, November 15. Dale Earnhardt won his first Winston Cup championship, winning by 19 points over Cale Yarborough. Jody Ridley was crowned NASCAR Rookie of the Year.

1981 Pro Bowl

The 1981 Pro Bowl was the NFL's 31st annual all-star game which featured the outstanding performers from the 1980 season. The game was played on Sunday, February 1, 1981, at Aloha Stadium in Honolulu, Hawaii. The final score was NFC 21, AFC 7.Sam Rutigliano of the Cleveland Browns led the AFC team against an NFC team coached by Atlanta Falcons head coach Leeman Bennett. The referee was Gordon McCarter.

2006 in NASCAR

In 2006 in NASCAR, the National Association for Stock Car Auto Racing (NASCAR) sanctioned three national touring series, eight regional touring series, and the Dodge Weekly Series for local competition. NASCAR champions in 2006 were Jimmie Johnson, Kevin Harvick, Todd Bodine, Eric Holmes, Mike Olsen, Mike Stefanik, Junior Miller, Tim Schendel, Gary Lewis, J. R. Norris, Rip Michels, and Philip Morris.

Bowman Gray Stadium

Bowman Gray Stadium is a NASCAR sanctioned 1⁄4-mile (0.40 km) asphalt flat oval short track and longstanding football stadium located in Winston-Salem, North Carolina. It is one of stock car racing's most legendary venues, and is referred to as "NASCAR's longest-running weekly race track". Bowman Gray Stadium is part of the Winston-Salem Sports and Entertainment Complex and is home of the Winston-Salem State University Rams football team. It was also the home of the Wake Forest University football team from 1956 until Groves Stadium (later BB&T Field) opened in 1968. Bowman Gray Stadium was a popular venue for high school football in the 1970s and 1980s. Parkland and R.J. Reynolds High Schools shared Bowman Gray Stadium as their home field for high school football until the two schools built their own facility (Deaton-Thompson Stadium) in 1994.

Craig Miller (broadcaster)

Craig "Junior" Miller (born December 20, 1965) in Amarillo, Texas) is an American radio personality and member of the Dunham and Miller Show, heard 5:30-10:00 AM on sports radio KTCK 1310 AM in Dallas, Texas. Miller co-hosts the show with long-time friend and college roommate George Dunham, alongside Gordon Keith.

Miller is one of the few remaining original Ticket hosts. Miller has been co-hosting with Dunham on the station since 1994. Miller has been nominated for and received several NAB Marconi Radio Awards throughout his career.Miller and his cohosts are the highest rated morning radio program in the Dallas-Fort Worth market.Miller is an avid runner and cyclist and often competes in competitive cycling events and marathons.

Fred Miller (American football, born 1973)

Fred Junior Miller, Jr. (born February 6, 1973) is a former American football offensive tackle. He most recently played for the Chicago Bears of the National Football League. He was drafted by the St. Louis Rams in the fifth round of the 1996 NFL Draft. He played college football at Baylor.

Miller was expected to struggle with Tennessee Titans rookie sensation Jevon Kearse in Super Bowl XXXIV, having given up several sacks to Kearse in the regular season match up between the teams. In Super Bowl XXXIV, Miller gave up no sacks (with the exception of one that was negated by a Kearse penalty) in the Rams' 23–16 championship win. Miller had the distinction of making the Rams' first reception of the game on a tipped pass, an unusual accomplishment for an offensive lineman. It would be Miller's final game with the Rams, as he signed with the Rams' Super Bowl opponent—the Titans—for the 2000 season.

Gordon Keith (radio host)

Gordon Keith is an “American” radio host on KTCK SportsRadio 1310 AM "The Ticket" in Dallas, Texas. He has shared hosting duties with George Dunham and Craig "Junior" Miller since 1994.

In July 2017, Gordon Keith won the "DFW's Favorite Broadcaster" tournament hosted by the Dallas Morning News.

Jim Acree

James D. Acree (April 17, 1928 – April 7, 1995) was a high school football coach. He is particularly known for his years at Corsicana High School in Corsicana, Texas, where he won a 3-A state championship in 1963, and at Robert E. Lee High School in Midland, Texas, where he coached from 1970 to 1977. He also had a short stint as assistant coach at Texas Tech University under head coach J. T. King.

Acree played collegiate football at the University of Oklahoma until 1953. He played center under coach Bud Wilkinson. He then became head coach at Bonham High School in Bonham, Texas.

At Midland Lee High, Acree coached a couple of future National Football League players, among them Pro Bowler Junior Miller, and Quarterback Brad Wright (Miami Dolphins, Dallas Cowboys, Detroit Lions), and at Corsicana some successful coaches, including Jerry Moore and Tom Wilson.

Junior Miller (disambiguation)

Junior Miller may refer to:

Junior Miller, Former player for the Atlanta Falcons and New Orleans Saints

Junior Miller (broadcaster), Dallas sports talk radio host on KTCK (AM)/KTCK-FM

MadHouse (TV series)

MadHouse was a TV series that aired on the American cable History Channel in 2010. It follows four teams of Modified class race car drivers through the 2009 season at Bowman Gray Stadium. The Modified Division is NASCAR's oldest division, and while the Northeast is the most popular region for this class of motorsport (NASCAR Hall of Fame member Richie Evans from Rome, NY, was a nine time Modified Division champion and won the inaugural touring series championship for Modifieds), it is a fan favorite at the Piedmont Triad's quarter-mile speedway.

Junior Miller, Tim "The Rocket" Brown, Burt and Jason Myers and Chris Fleming are the five drivers who are followed throughout the series. Later drivers Jonathan "Jon Boy" Brown, Austin Pack, and Gene Pack are introduced to the audience.

NASCAR Whelen Southern Modified Tour

The NASCAR Whelen Southern Modified Tour (WSMT) was a stock car racing series owned by NASCAR and operated in the Southeastern United States as part of its Modified Division. The series began in 1989 as the Southern Modified Auto Racing Teams (S.M.A.R.T.) before NASCAR took over the series in 2005. The Whelen Southern Modified Tour used nearly identical rules as its northeastern-based counterpart the NASCAR Whelen Modified Tour.

The series merged with the Modified Tour in 2017.

Offense
Defense
Special teams

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