Jump shift

The jump shift or Heisman shift, was an American football shift maneuver utilized by John Heisman.[1][2] In this system, only the center was on the line of scrimmage, and the backfield would be in a line, as one would in an I-formation with an extra halfback at the hind end, or a giant T. The players could shift into various formations. In one version, the line shifted so that the center was between guard and tackle, and the three back nearest the line of scrimmage would shift all to one side. A split second elapsed, then the ball was snapped and the wall of three blockers charged on.[3] If needed, the center could also snap it to one of the other backs.[4] The phalanx of blockers resembled the yet-to-be developed single wing.[4] The Heisman shift was considered more complicated than its predecessors (say the Minnesota shift).[5]

Heismanatshift
Diagram of the Heisman shift.

References

  1. ^ Magee, Mary (2012). Red, Third Edition. Beyond Football: The Legacy of Coach Jimmy 'Red' Parker. Tate Publishing & Enterprises. p. 256. ISBN 978-1-62024-962-8.
  2. ^ John Heisman. Principles of Football. p. 267.
  3. ^ John Heisman. "Jump Shift Is A Legal Play". The Washington Herald. Retrieved June 2, 2015 – via Newspapers.com. open access
  4. ^ a b "Archived copy" (PDF). Archived from the original (PDF) on 2016-03-04. Retrieved 2015-03-11.CS1 maint: Archived copy as title (link)
  5. ^ Neil R. Kohn (1964). "heisman+shift" The Evolution of Offensive Football, 1913-1963. p. 46.
1910 Georgia Tech Yellow Jackets football team

The 1910 Georgia Tech Yellow Jackets football team represented the Georgia Institute of Technology during the 1910 college football season.

1912 Georgia Tech Yellow Jackets football team

The 1912 Georgia Tech Yellow Jackets football team represented the Georgia Institute of Technology during the 1912 college football season. Alf McDonald was All-Southern.

1914 Georgia Tech Yellow Jackets football team

The 1914 Georgia Tech Yellow Jackets football team represented the Georgia Tech Golden Tornado of the Georgia Institute of Technology during the 1914 college football season. The Tornado was coached by John Heisman in his 11th year as head coach, compiling a record of 6–2. Georgia Tech played its home games at Grant Field.

1915 Georgia Bulldogs football team

The 1915 Georgia Bulldogs football team represented the Georgia Bulldogs of the University of Georgia during the 1915 college football season. The Bulldogs completed the season with a 5–2–2 record. Tennessee-Chattanooga joined the Southern Intercollegiate Athletic Association (SIAA) in 1914, so the 1915 game was a conference game. Due to the loss to Auburn, Georgia finished 3–1–1 in the SIAA.

The only blemish on in-state rival Georgia Tech's record was a scoreless tie with Georgia. John G. Henderson headed a group of three men, one behind the other with his hands upon the shoulders of the one in front, to counter Heisman's jump shift offense.

1915 Georgia Tech Yellow Jackets football team

The 1915 Georgia Tech Yellow Jackets football team represented the Georgia Tech Golden Tornado of the Georgia Institute of Technology during the 1915 college football season. The Tornado was coached by John Heisman in his 12th year as head coach, compiling a record of 7–0–1 and outscoring opponents 233 to 24. Georgia Tech played its home games at Grant Field. The Tech team claims a Southern championship, and had what was then the greatest season in its history.

1916 Georgia Tech Yellow Jackets football team

The 1916 Georgia Tech Yellow Jackets football team represented the Georgia Tech Golden Tornado of the Georgia Institute of Technology during the 1916 Southern Intercollegiate Athletic Association football season. Georgia Tech was a member of the Southern Intercollegiate Athletic Association (SIAA). The Tornado was coached by John Heisman in his 13th year as head coach, compiling a record of 8–0–1 (5–0 SIAA) and outscoring opponents 421 to 20. Georgia Tech played its home games at Grant Field. One writer claimed the 1916 team "seemed to personify Heisman." This was the first team to vault Georgia Tech to national prominence.The season featured the 222–0 defeat of Cumberland, the largest margin of victory in football history. Tech scored the second-most points in the nation, behind Georgetown. Everett Strupper was third in the nation in scoring, including 16 touchdowns.Several players received post-season honors. Pup Phillips was the first Tech center selected All-Southern, and was selected third-team All-America by Walter Camp. Along with Phillips and Strupper, tackle Walker Carpenter, guard Bob Lang, and fullback Tommy Spence were also All-Southern.

1917 Georgia Tech Golden Tornado football team

The 1917 Georgia Tech Golden Tornado football team represented the Georgia Institute of Technology (commonly known as Georgia Tech) in American football during the 1917 Southern Intercollegiate Athletic Association football season. The Golden Tornado, coached by John Heisman in his 14th year as head coach, compiled a 9–0 record (4–0 SIAA) and outscored opponents 491 to 17 on the way to its first national championship. Heisman considered the 1917 team his best, and for many years it was considered "the greatest football team the South had ever produced". The team was named national champion by Billingsley, Helms, Houlgate, and NCF The backfield of Albert Hill, Everett Strupper, Joe Guyon, and Judy Harlan led the Golden Tornado, and all four rushed for more than 100 yards in a 48–0 victory over Tulane. During the regular season Georgia Tech defeated strong opponents by large margins, and its 41–0 victory over eastern power Penn shocked many. Davidson, with Buck Flowers (a future Tech star), was defeated 32–10. Tech's 83–0 victory over Vanderbilt is the worst loss in Vanderbilt history, and its 63–0 defeat of Washington & Lee was the worst loss in W&L history at the time. Tech finished the season by defeating Auburn 68–7, clinching the conference title. Davidson and Auburn were the only teams to score points against Georgia Tech.

1918 Georgia Tech Golden Tornado football team

The 1918 Georgia Tech Golden Tornado football team represented the Georgia Tech Golden Tornado of the Georgia Institute of Technology during the 1918 Southern Intercollegiate Athletic Association football season. The Tornado was coached by John Heisman in his 15th year as head coach, compiling a record of 6–1 (3–0 SIAA) and outscoring opponents 466 to 32. Georgia Tech played its home games at Grant Field.

Tech eclipsed 100 points three different times. Its only road game was its only loss to national champion Pittsburgh at Forbes Field. Pittsburgh was the only team to score on Tech during the 1918 season. The defeat ended Georgia Tech's 33-game winning streak.

Center Bum Day was recognized as a consensus first-team All-American. He was a first-team selection by Walter Camp; the first Southerner to be chosen for Camp's All-America first team. Bill Fincher and Joe Guyon also made consensus All-America. Fincher and Buck Flowers made Camp's second-team.

1921 Georgia Tech Golden Tornado football team

The 1921 Georgia Tech Golden Tornado football team represented the Georgia Tech Golden Tornado of the Georgia Institute of Technology during the 1921 Southern Intercollegiate Athletic Association football season. The team played its home games at Grant Field. Its only loss was in its only road game, at the Polo Grounds in New York City, to undefeated eastern power Penn State.

The Tornado was coached by William Alexander in his second year as head coach, compiling an 8–1 record (5–0 against Southern Intercollegiate Athletic Association (SIAA) teams) and outscoring opponents 360 to 56. The team shared the SIAA title with the Georgia Bulldogs and Vanderbilt Commodores.

Captain Judy Harlan made Walter Camp's third-team All-America. Red Barron led the team in scoring and rushed for 1,459 yards during the season, a school record at the time.

1922 Georgia Tech Golden Tornado football team

The 1922 Georgia Tech Golden Tornado football team represented the Georgia Tech Golden Tornado of the Georgia Institute of Technology during the 1922 Southern Conference football season. The Tornado was coached by William Alexander in his 3rd year as head coach, compiling a record of 7–2 (4–0 SoCon) and outscoring opponents 157 to 59.

Red Barron made Walter Camp's second-team All-America.

1922 Penn Quakers football team

The 1922 Penn Quakers football team represented the University of Pennsylvania in the 1922 college football season.

1923 Georgia Tech Golden Tornado football team

The 1923 Georgia Tech Golden Tornado football team represented the Georgia Tech Golden Tornado of the Georgia Institute of Technology during the 1923 college football season. Tech had ties in every one of its conference games.

1925 Georgia Tech Golden Tornado football team

The 1925 Georgia Tech Golden Tornado football team represented the Georgia Tech Golden Tornado of the Georgia Institute of Technology during the 1925 Southern Conference football season. The Tornado was coached by William Alexander in his 6th year as head coach, compiling a record of 6–2–1. The team was captained by Doug Wycoff. It had one of the best defenses in school history.The team most notably beat Penn State. It suffered losses to national champion Alabama and the defending national champion Notre Dame Fighting Irish. It also had a surprise tie with rival Auburn.

1926 Georgia Tech Golden Tornado football team

The 1926 Georgia Tech Golden Tornado football team represented the Georgia Tech Golden Tornado of the Georgia Institute of Technology during the 1926 Southern Conference football season. The Tornado was coached by William Alexander in his 7th year as head coach, compiling a record of 4–5.

John Heisman

John William Heisman (October 23, 1869 – October 3, 1936) was a player and coach of American football, baseball, and basketball, as well as a sportswriter and actor. He served as the head football coach at Oberlin College, Buchtel College (now known as the University of Akron), Auburn University, Clemson University, Georgia Tech, the University of Pennsylvania, Washington & Jefferson College, and Rice University, compiling a career college football record of 186–70–18. In 1917, Heisman's Georgia Tech Golden Tornado team was recognized as the national champion.

Heisman was also the head basketball coach at Georgia Tech, tallying a mark of 9–14, and the head baseball coach at Buchtel, Clemson, and Georgia Tech, amassing a career college baseball record of 199–108–7. He served as the athletic director at Georgia Tech and Rice. While at Georgia Tech, he was also the president of the Atlanta Crackers baseball team.

Sportswriter Fuzzy Woodruff dubbed Heisman the "pioneer of Southern football". He was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame as a coach in 1954. His entry there notes that Heisman "stands only behind Amos Alonzo Stagg, Pop Warner, and Walter Camp as a master innovator of the brand of football of his day". He was instrumental in several changes to the game, including legalizing the forward pass. The Heisman Trophy, awarded annually to the season's most outstanding college football player, is named after him.

Shift (gridiron football)

In gridiron football, a shift refers to the movement of an offensive player prior to the snap.

Statue of Liberty play

The Statue of Liberty is a trick play in American football named after the Statue of Liberty.

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