Julie Ertz

Julie Beth Ertz (née Johnston; born April 6, 1992) is an American soccer player and FIFA Women's World Cup champion. She plays as a midfielder for the Chicago Red Stars of the National Women's Soccer League (NWSL), the highest division of women's professional soccer in the United States, and the United States women's national soccer team. She first appeared for the United States national team during an international friendly against Scotland on February 9, 2013. She has since made 87 total appearances for the team and scored 19 goals.

Ertz has represented the United States at two FIFA Women's World Cup tournaments in 2015 and 2019. At 23, she was the second youngest member of the 2015 team behind 22-year-old Morgan Brian. The United States went on to the World Cup final where she played every minute of all seven games of the tournament and was subsequently named to the FIFA Women's World Cup All-Star Team.

Ertz played collegiate soccer with the Santa Clara University Broncos from 2010 to 2013. Following her collegiate career, Ertz was selected third overall by the Chicago Red Stars in the 2014 NWSL College Draft that took place on January 17, 2014. She is in her fifth season with the Red Stars to date.

After moving to center midfield for club and country in 2017, Ertz was awarded U.S. Soccer Female Player of the Year.

Ertz was again nominated for U.S. Soccer Female Player of the Year in 2018 alongside Alex Morgan, Tobin Heath, Lindsey Horan, and Megan Rapinoe.[2]

Julie Ertz
Julie Ertz (37202999442)
Ertz during a friendly against New Zealand in 2017
Personal information
Full name Julie Beth Ertz
Birth name Julie Beth Johnston[1]
Date of birth April 6, 1992 (age 27)
Place of birth Mesa, Arizona, U.S.
Height 5 ft 7 in (170 cm)[1]
Playing position Midfielder / Defender
Club information
Current team
Chicago Red Stars
Number 8
Youth career
AYSO Region 503
2000–2004 Arizona Arsenal Soccer Club
2004–2010 Sereno Soccer Club
College career
Years Team Apps (Gls)
2010–2013 Santa Clara Broncos 79 (31)
Senior career*
Years Team Apps (Gls)
2014– Chicago Red Stars 72 (6)
National team
United States U15
United States U18
2012 United States U20
2013 United States U23
2013– United States 88 (19)
* Senior club appearances and goals counted for the domestic league only and correct as of January 22, 2019
‡ National team caps and goals correct as of July 7, 2019

Early life

Born in Mesa, Arizona to Kristi and David Johnston, Julie was raised with her sister Melanie Johnston.[1] Julie was introduced to soccer through her local AYSO region[3]. The Johnston sisters played for Sereno Soccer Club in Phoenix, Julie played for the 1992 side and Melanie played for the 1990s. Regarding Julie's switch to the team, Johnston stated that "it ended up being the best decision [she's] ever made."[4] Sereno was a nationally known club with alumni that have gone on to play in college, on professional teams and for national teams.[4] Ertz played with the team from 2004 to 2010 on the U13 through U19 teams. She won the state title nine times during her time there and was captain of the team.[5][6]

Ertz attended Dobson High School in Mesa from 2006 to 2010, where she volunteered as a student athletic trainer all four years. She never played for the soccer team at the school, instead opting to devote her time to playing for Sereno.[7] While at Dobson, Ertz was a member of the National Honor Society.[5]

Santa Clara Broncos, 2010–2013

Ertz attended Santa Clara University, where she majored in communications and played as a midfielder for the Broncos women's soccer team. In 2010, as a college freshman, she played in 20 games, starting 16 and accumulating 1,519 minutes of playing time. At the end of the season, she led the team in assists with five and recorded the third-most shots on the team with 31. She was named WCC Freshman of the Year and received NSCAA All-West Region Second-Team, Soccer America All-Freshman First-Team, All-WCC Second-Team, and WCC All-Freshman team honors.[8]

As a sophomore in 2011, Ertz started all 21 games with nine goals and four assists for the Broncos. She scored four game-winning goals in matches away to Cal Poly, and at home to WSU, Cal and Nevada. She was a WCC Hermann Trophy semi-finalist and was named to the NSCAA All-American First-Team as well as the All-WCC First-Team.[8]

In 2012, which was her junior year, Ertz started 14 of the 15 games she played and led the Broncos with eight goals and was second on the team with five assists. She scored three game-winning goals and recorded an assist in the first round of the NCAA Women's Soccer Tournament in a match against Long Beach State. She was subsequently named to the All-WCC First Team and NCAA Division I Women All-West Region First Team. She was a MAC Hermann Trophy semi-finalist and was named U.S. Soccer Young Female Athlete of the Year.[8]

In 2013, Ertz played in 22 games and led the team with eight assists and four game-winning goals. She made a total of 12 goals in the season and recorded an assist in the first round of the NCAA Women's Soccer Tournament in a match against University of California at Berkeley. At the end of the season, she was named to the NSCAA All-American First Team, NSCAA All-West Region First Team, All-WCC First Team and College Sports Madness All-WCC First Team. She was also named WCC Player of the Year and College Sports Madness WCC Player of the Year.[8] Overall, Ertz has made 79 appearances and scored 31 goals with the Broncos.[9][8]

Club career

2014-07-26 JulieJohnston KealiaOhai
Ertz (then known as Johnston; left) with the Chicago Red Stars during a match against Houston Dash on July 26, 2014

Chicago Red Stars, 2014–

On January 17, 2014, Ertz was selected third overall in the first round of the 2014 NWSL College Draft by the Chicago Red Stars.[10] She subsequently signed with the team for the 2014 season.[11] She made her first appearance for the team on April 19 in a match against the Western New York Flash. She scored the only goal of the match in the 59th minute.[12] In the 2014 season, Ertz started in 21 matches and scored two goals. The Red Stars finished fifth in the regular season with a 9–7–8 record and did not advance to the playoffs.[13] Ertz was named NWSL Rookie of the Year following the 2014 season.[14]

In 2015, Ertz missed almost half of the NWSL season due to commitments with the United States women's national team at the FIFA Women's World Cup in Canada.[15] She returned to the Red Stars on July 22 during a match against the Boston Breakers, which ended in 2–1 victory for the Red Stars.[16] She made 11 appearances for the Red Stars during the 2015 season, playing 990 minutes.[17] The Red Stars finished second in the regular season with an 8–3–9 record and advanced to the playoffs.[18] The Red Stars faced FC Kansas City in the semi-finals of the playoffs on September 13.[19] Ertz started in the match, which ended in a 0–3 defeat for the Red Stars and they were eliminated from the playoffs.[20] Following the 2015 season, Ertz was named to the NWSL Best XI.[21]

Ertz made twelve appearances for the Red Stars during the 2016 season before joining the national team in preparation for the 2016 Summer Olympics in Rio de Janeiro.[17]

In the 2017 season, Ertz debuted in a new role in attacking midfield, scoring the winning goal in a 1–0 victory over FC Kansas City in week 2.[m 1] Ertz was named to the NWSL Second XI for the season after leading Chicago to the championship semi-final, where they lost out for the third consecutive season.[22]

Ertz missed the beginning of the 2018 NWSL season as she was recovering from a knee injury suffered at the 2018 SheBelieves Cup, she made her first appearance of the season on April 28 in a 1–1 draw against the Washington Spirit. Ertz played in 15 games for the Red Stars in 2018 as they qualified for the playoffs for the fourth straight season. The semi-final was a rematch with the North Carolina Courage, Chicago lost 2–0 which was their fourth consecutive semi-final loss.[23] Ertz was named the 2018 NWSL Second XI.

International

Youth national teams

In 2006, Ertz attended the United States U14 National Identification Camp.[5] In 2009, she was called into a U18 national team training camp from May 30 to June 7 at The Home Depot Center in Carson, California.[24]

In 2012, Ertz competed in international under-20 youth soccer and scored a goal against Switzerland at the La Manga Tournament in Spain. Heading into the 2012 FIFA U-20 Women's World Cup, she had 13 caps and four goals for the U20 team.[25] Ertz captained the United States team to the Japan 2012 U20 FIFA Women's World Cup; winning the 2012 CONCACAF Under-20 Women's Championship along the way. In the main tournament, one of the goals she scored was in the 4–0 semi-final victory over Mexico that advanced the United States to the World Cup finals.[26] In Japan, Ertz captained her team to win the FIFA under-20 world cup, and won the Bronze Ball award herself.[25]

In 2013, Ertz played for the U23 team in the Four Nations Tournament in La Manga, Spain. The team won the tournament, beating England in the final on March 7.[27]

Senior national team

First caps, 2013–2014

Ertz was first called up to the national team in January 2013, when she was on the 29-player roster for a training camp leading up to two matches against Scotland in early February.[28] Ertz made her first appearance for the national team in their first match of the year on February 9, 2013 against Scotland. She came in for Becky Sauerbrunn in the 83rd minute to help the United States win the match 4–1.[29]

Ertz traveled to Europe with the national team for matches against Germany and the Netherlands in early April.[30] On April 9, Ertz started in the midfield in the match against the Netherlands. Ertz scored in the 73rd minute but the referee ruled that she was offside and the goal was called back. The United States won the match, 3–1.[31] In late May, Ertz was named to the 21-player roster that traveled to Canada to train in preparation for a match against Canada on June 2.[32] She did not appear in the match.[33]

Ertz started off 2014 at a national team training camp from January 8 to 15 at U.S. Soccer's National Training Center in Carson, California.[34] Ertz was not named to the roster for the 2014 Algarve Cup in March.[35] In late April, Ertz was named to a 22-player roster for a match against Canada on May 8.[36] She was then named to the roster for two games against France on June 14 and 19.[37] Ertz was named to a 19-player roster for a match against Switzerland on August 20 in Sandy, Utah.[38] She came in for Sauerbrunn in the second half and the United States went on the win 4–1.[39]

Ertz joined the national team for a training camp at the end of August in order to prepare for two matches against Mexico in September as well as the 2014 CONCACAF Women's qualifying tournament in October.[40] Initially, she was not named to the roster for the 2014 CONCACAF Women's Championship that served as a qualification for the 2015 FIFA Women's World Cup.[41] However, one day before the team's first match of the tournament, Ertz replaced an injured Crystal Dunn on the roster.[42] The United States qualified for the 2015 FIFA Women's World Cup after a semi-final win against Mexico on October 24.[43] Following the CONCACAF Qualifying tournament, Ertz was named to the 24-player roster for the International Tournament of Brasília in Brazil that took place from December 10 to 21.[44] Ertz made one appearance in the opening game of the tournament on December 10 against China, which resulted in a 1–1 draw.[45] The final game against Brazil was a 0–0 draw, but the tournament title was given to Brazil, who had more points from the group stage.[46]

Algarve Cup and FIFA World Cup, 2015

Julie Johnston
Playing in a friendly, May 2015

Ertz started off 2015 at a 21-day training camp from January 5 to 25 at the U.S. Soccer National Training Center in Carson, California.[47] Following the training camp, she was named to the 24–player team that would travel on a 13-day trip to Europe for matches against France and England in mid-February.[48] On February 21, Ertz was named to the 25-player roster for the 2015 Algarve Cup in Portugal.[49] She started three matches of the tournament, including in the final against France on March 11. During the game, Ertz scored her first international goal in the 7th minute to help the United States defeat France 2–0 to win the tournament.[50]

On April 14, Ertz was named to the 23-player roster that would represent the United States at the 2015 FIFA Women's World Cup.[51] She was one of the five United States players that played every minute in all seven matches for the United States during the World Cup.[52] In the 59th minute of the team's semi-final match against Germany on June 30, Ertz pulled down opposition player Alexandra Popp inside the penalty box and was given a yellow card. Celia Sasic took the subsequent penalty kick but missed the net. The United States went on to win the match 2–0 to advance to the World Cup final.[53] In the final, the United States faced Japan on July 5. In the 52nd minute, Ertz attempted to block a free kick but instead scored an own goal. However, the United States still went on to win the match and the World Cup title.[52] Following the tournament, Ertz was named to the FIFA Women's World Cup All-Star Team.[5] She joined the national team on a Victory Tour following their World Cup win that started in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania on August 16 and ended in New Orleans, Louisiana on December 16.[54][55]

Olympic Qualifying, SheBelieves Cup, and Rio Olympics, 2016

Johnston Cleveland
Yuika Sugasawa is fouled by Ertz in the 13th minute of the match between the United States and Japan on June 5, 2016

Ertz joined the national team for their first training camp of the year at the U.S. Soccer National Training Center in Carson, California from January 5 to 21.[56] She was then named to the 20-player roster for 2016 CONCACAF Women's Olympic Qualifying tournament.[57] The United States qualified to the 2016 Olympic Games in Rio de Janeiro after a semi-final win against Trinidad and Tobago on February 19.[58] The United States won the tournament after defeating Canada 2–0 on February 21.[59]

Ertz was named to the roster for the 2016 SheBelieves Cup that took place from March 3 to 9.[60] She came in for Alex Morgan in the 80th minute of the team's opening match of the tournament on March 3 against England.[61] She also made appearances in other two matches of the tournament, helping the United States win the 2016 SheBelieves Cup with a 2–1 win over Germany in their final game.[62][63]

Ertz joined a 23-player roster for a training camp ahead of two matches against Colombia in early April.[64] In the second match on April 10, Ertz played all 90 minutes and scored two goals to help the United States defeat Colombia 3–0.[65] Ertz was on the roster for another two-game series against Japan in early June.[66] She started in both games and scored a goal in the 27th minute of the second match on June 5.[67][68]

On July 12, Ertz was named to the 18-player team that would represent the United States at the 2016 Olympic Games in Rio de Janeiro.[69] She made her Olympic debut on August 3 in the team's opening match against New Zealand, a 2–0 victory.[70] She did not appear in the team's remaining two group matches due to a sore groin.[71] She returned for the team's quarterfinal match against Sweden where she played the full game, which the U.S. would go on to lose in penalty kicks.

2017–present

Beginning in 2017, Ertz was shifted from center back to a defensive center midfield position as coach Jill Ellis experimented with new formations. She found success in the role and in 2017 she was named the U.S. Soccer Female Player of the Year.[72]

In May 2019, she was named to the final 23-player roster for the 2019 FIFA Women's World Cup in France, marking her second World Cup appearance.[73] She scored in the 3-0 win over Chile.[74]

Personal life

Ertz is a Christian.[75] She is married to Zach Ertz, a tight end for the Philadelphia Eagles in the National Football League. The two met in college while attending a Stanford Cardinal baseball game.[76] In February 2016, the couple got engaged at the same baseball stadium where they met.[77] They were married on March 26, 2017, off the coast of Santa Barbara, California.[78][79]

In popular culture

Video games

Ertz was featured along with her national teammates in the EA Sports' FIFA video game series in FIFA 16, the first time women players were included in the game.[80]

Ticker Tape Parade and White House honor

Following the United States' win at the 2015 FIFA Women's World Cup, Ertz and her teammates became the first women's sports team to be honored with a Ticker tape parade in New York City.[81] Each player received a key to the city from Mayor Bill de Blasio.[82] In October of the same year, the team was honored by President Barack Obama at the White House.[83]

Player statistics

International goals

Honors and awards

Individual

College

  • WCC Freshman of the Year: 2010[8]
  • NSCAA All-West Region Second Team: 2010[8]
  • Soccer America All-Freshman First Team: 2010[8]
  • All-WCC Second Team: 2010[8]
  • WCC All-Freshman Team: 2010[8]
  • NSCAA All-American First Team: 2011, 2013[8]
  • All-WCC First Team: 2011, 2012, 2013[8]
  • Preseason All-WCC: 2011[8]
  • Top Drawer Soccer Team of the Year: 2012[8]
  • NCAA Division I Women All-West Region First Team: 2012[8]
  • NSCAA All-West Region First Team: 2013[8]
  • WCC Player of the Year: 2013[8]
  • College Sports Madness WCC Player of the Year: 2013[8]
  • College Sports Madness All-WCC First Team: 2013[8]

Club

  • NWSL Rookie of the Year: 2014[14]
  • NWSL Best XI: 2015[21]
  • NWSL Second XI: 2016, 2017, 2018 [98]

International

See also

References

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  89. ^ "WNT Downs World No. 1 Germany 2–0 to Advance to 2015 World Cup Final". U.S. Soccer. June 30, 2015. Retrieved July 24, 2016.
  90. ^ "USA Opens 2016 Olympic Games With 2–0 Group G Win Against New Zealand". U.S. Soccer. August 3, 2016. Retrieved August 6, 2016.
  91. ^ "USA Surges to World Cup Record 13-0 Win in Opening Match Against Thailand". U.S. Soccer. June 11, 2019.
  92. ^ "USA Through to World Cup Knockout Rounds After 3-0 Victory Against Chile in Group F: Match Report". U.S. Soccer. June 16, 2019.
  93. ^ "USA Advances to 2019 World Cup Quarterfinals With 2-1 Triumph vs. Spain". U.S. Soccer. June 24, 2019.
  94. ^ "Megan Rapinoe Scores Twice as USA Defeats France 2-1 to Reach 2019 FIFA Women's World Cup Semifinals". U.S. Soccer. June 28, 2019.
  95. ^ "USA Earns Record Fifth Berth to a Women's World Cup Final With 2-1 Win Against England in Semifinal". U.S. Soccer. July 2, 2019.
  96. ^ "USA Wins Back-to-Back Women's World Cup Titles With 2-0 Triumph Against the Netherlands". U.S. Soccer. July 7, 2019.
  97. ^ "Julie Ertz Named 2017 US Soccer Female Player of the Year". U.S. Soccer. December 20, 2017. Retrieved June 29, 2018.
  98. ^ "Catley And Morgan Named to 2017 NWSL Second XI Honors". Orlando City SC. October 12, 2017. Retrieved June 28, 2018.
  99. ^ Orsatti, Andrew. "First Women's World XI revealed". FIFPro World Players' Union. Retrieved July 8, 2018.
  100. ^ "WNT wins 2018 SheBelieves Cup with 1–0 Victory vs. England". U.S. Soccer. March 7, 2018. Retrieved March 8, 2018.
  101. ^ "U-20 WNT Crowned 2012 FIFA World Cup Champions". U.S. Soccer. September 8, 2012. Retrieved May 21, 2018.
  102. ^ "WNT Rolls Past Costa Rica 6–0 to Win 2014 CONCACAF Women's Championship Crown". U.S. Soccer. October 26, 2014. Retrieved May 21, 2018.
  103. ^ "WNT Defeats France 2–0 to win 10th Algarve Cup". U.S. Soccer. March 11, 2015. Retrieved May 21, 2018.
  104. ^ "USA 5–2 Japan". FIFA.com. July 5, 2015. Retrieved May 21, 2018.
  105. ^ "WNT Defeats Canada 2–0 to Claim 2016 Olympic Qualifying Title". U.S. Soccer. February 21, 2016. Retrieved May 21, 2018.

Match reports

  1. ^ Purdy, Jacqueline (April 22, 2017). "Chicago Red Stars vs FC Kansas City". nwslsoccer.com. National Women's Soccer League. Retrieved June 29, 2018.
  2. ^ "WNT Defeats France 2–0 to Win 10th Algarve Cup". U.S.Soccer.
  3. ^ "U.S. WNT 4 vs. New Zealand 0". U.S.Soccer.
  4. ^ "Wambach, Johnston Steer USA to 3–0 Win Over Ireland on Mother's Day". U.S. Soccer.com.
  5. ^ "World Champion U.S. WNT Opens Victory Tour with 8–0 Win Against Costa Rica in Front of Record Crowd in Pittsburgh". U.S.Soccer.
  6. ^ "Lloyd Hat Trick Leads WNT in 8–0 Victory against Haiti in Birmingham". U.S.Soccer. September 20, 2015. Retrieved September 20, 2015.
  7. ^ "U.S. WNT Tops Colombia 3–0 in Front of Sold-Out Crowd in Pennsylvania". U.S.Soccer. April 10, 2016. Retrieved April 10, 2016.
  8. ^ "Johnston, Morgan Goals Lift USA to 2–0 Win vs. Japan in Front of Record Ohio Crowd". U.S.Soccer. June 5, 2016. Retrieved June 6, 2016.
  9. ^ "USA Fights Back to Claim Dramatic 4–3 Win vs. Brazil in #ToN2017". U.S. Soccer. Retrieved July 31, 2017.
  10. ^ "O'Hara Earns 100th Cap As WNT Downs New Zealand 3–1 in Denver Behind First Half Ertz Brace". U.S.Soccer. September 15, 2017. Retrieved November 19, 2017.
  11. ^ "WNT Downs Korea Republic 3–1 in New Orleans". U.S. Soccer. October 19, 2017. Retrieved December 7, 2017.
  12. ^ "WNT Puts on a Show in 6–0 Defeat of Korea Republic in Cary, N.C." U.S. Soccer. October 22, 2017. Retrieved December 7, 2017.
  13. ^ "U.S. WNT Closes 2017 with 3–1 Win Against Canada in San Jose". U.S. Soccer. November 12, 2017. Retrieved December 7, 2017.
  14. ^ "WNT Beats Reigning EURO Runners-up Denmark 5–1 in Thrilling 2018 Opener". U.S. Soccer. January 21, 2018. Retrieved January 24, 2018.
  15. ^ "RAPINOE, MORGAN BAG BRACES AS USA ROLLS PAST MEXICO 6–0 IN 2018 CONCACAF WOMEN'S CHAMPIONSHIP OPENER". U.S. Soccer. October 4, 2018. Retrieved October 5, 2018.
  16. ^ "USA Qualifies for 2019 FIFA Women's World Cup with Big Win vs. JAmaica". U.S. Soccer. October 14, 2018. Retrieved October 15, 2018.

External links

2017 CONCACAF Awards

The shortlists for the 2017 CONCACAF Awards were announced on 22 November 2017. The results were announced on 18 and 19 December 2017.

2017 Chicago Red Stars season

The 2017 Chicago Red Stars season was the team's ninth season. The team competed in the National Women's Soccer League, the top tier of women's soccer in the United States. In 2017, for the third consecutive season, the Red Stars made it to the post-season playoffs and was eliminated in the semi-final.

2017 National Women's Soccer League season

The 2017 National Women's Soccer League season was the fifth season of the National Women's Soccer League, the top division of women's soccer in the United States. Including the NWSL's two professional predecessors, Women's Professional Soccer (2009–2011) and the Women's United Soccer Association (2001–2003), it was the eleventh overall season of FIFA- and USSF-sanctioned top-division women's soccer in the United States. The league is operated by the United States Soccer Federation and receives major financial backing from that body. Further financial backing is provided by the Canadian Soccer Association; both national federations pay the league salaries of many of their respective national team members in an effort to nurture talent in those nations.

The reigning champions Western New York Flash did not play under that name; the franchise was sold, relocated to Cary, North Carolina and rebranded as the North Carolina Courage.After schedule disruptions in the previous two years caused by the 2015 FIFA Women's World Cup and the 2016 Summer Olympics, NWSL teams in 2017 once again played 24 games, a schedule last played during the 2014 season. The Courage won the NWSL Shield (the regular season), topping the Portland Thorns by two points.

The NWSL Playoff semifinals were held October 7–8, 2017, and were won by the Thorns and the Courage. The NWSL Championship Game was held on October 14, 2017 at Orlando City Stadium in Orlando, Florida. The Thorns won 1–0, becoming NWSL Champions, their second championship.

2017 Tournament of Nations

The 2017 Tournament of Nations was the inaugural Tournament of Nations, an international women's football tournament, consisting of a series of friendly games. It was held in the United States, from July 27 to August 3, 2017, and featured four teams.

2018 CONCACAF Awards

The shortlists for the 2018 CONCACAF Awards were announced on 11 December 2018.

The awards are for performances between 1 January and 10 December 2018. The results were announced on 15 January 2019.

2018 CONCACAF Women's Championship

The 2018 CONCACAF Women's Championship was the 10th edition of the CONCACAF Women's Championship (also known as the CONCACAF Women's Gold Cup or the CONCACAF Women's World Cup Qualifying Tournament), the quadrennial international football championship organised by CONCACAF for the women's national teams of the North, Central American and Caribbean region. Eight teams played in the tournament, which took place from 4–17 October in the United States.The tournament served as the CONCACAF qualifiers to the 2019 FIFA Women's World Cup in France. The top three teams qualified for the World Cup, while the fourth-placed team advanced to a play-off against the third-placed team from the South American confederation, CONMEBOL. It also determined the CONCACAF teams playing at the 2019 Pan American Games women's football tournament in Lima.The United States were the defending champions of the competition. They successfully defended their title as hosts, winning the final 2–0 against Canada for their 8th CONCACAF Women's Championship title.

2018 Chicago Red Stars season

The 2018 Chicago Red Stars season was the team's tenth season and sixth season in the National Women's Soccer League, the top tier of women's soccer in the United States. For the fourth consecutive season, the team qualified for the post-season playoffs and lost in the semi-final, as they were defeated by the North Carolina Courage 2–0.

2018 Tournament of Nations

The 2018 Tournament of Nations was the second Tournament of Nations, an international women's football tournament, consisting of a series of friendly games. It was held in the United States, from July 26 to August 2, 2018, and featured the same four teams as the previous tournament.

2019 Chicago Red Stars season

The 2019 Chicago Red Stars season was the team's eleventh season and seventh season in the National Women's Soccer League, the top tier of women's soccer in the United States.

2019 FIFA Women's World Cup Group F

Group F of the 2019 FIFA Women's World Cup took place from 11 to 20 June 2019. The group consisted of Chile, Sweden, Thailand and the United States. The top two teams, the United States and Sweden, advanced to the round of 16.

2019 FIFA Women's World Cup knockout stage

The knockout stage of the 2019 FIFA Women's World Cup was the second and final stage of the competition, following the group stage. It began on 22 June with the round of 16 and ended on 7 July with the final match, held at the Parc Olympique Lyonnais in Décines-Charpieu. A total of 16 teams (the top two teams from each group, along with the four best third-placed teams) advanced to the knockout stage to compete in a single-elimination style tournament.All times listed are local, CEST (UTC+2).

Christen Press

Christen Annemarie Press (born December 29, 1988) is an American soccer striker and FIFA Women's World Cup champion. She plays for Utah Royals FC in the National Women's Soccer League (NWSL) and the United States women's national soccer team. Press previously played for the Chicago Red Stars, Kopparbergs/Göteborg FC and Tyresö FF in the Damallsvenskan in Sweden and magicJack in the WPS.

Since earning her first cap for the senior national team in February 2013, Press has made more than 120 appearances and scored over 45 goals. She won a gold medal with the team at the 2015 FIFA Women's World Cup in Canada and again in 2019 at the World Cup in France.

Press was the recipient of the Hermann Trophy in 2010 and holds the all-time scoring and assists records at Stanford University. In 2011, she was named WPS Rookie of the Year. She was the Damallsvenskan's top scorer in 2013, with 23 goals scored for Tyresö FF, and became the first American to earn the Golden Boot award in the history of the Swedish League.

Johnston (surname)

Johnston is in most cases a habitational surname derived from several places in Scotland. Historically the surname has been most common throughout Scotland and Ireland.

List of players who have won multiple FIFA Women's World Cups

Below is a list of players who have won multiple FIFA Women's World Cups.

NWSL Player Allocation

The National Women's Soccer League (NWSL) Player Allocation distributed the national team players that would be paid for by the United States Soccer Federation (USSF), the Canadian Soccer Association (CSA), and the Mexican Football Federation (FMF) to the eight founding teams of the NWSL. The initial allocation list was announced on January 9, 2013, with the results for the 55 national team players announced two days later. From tweets concerning the first trade in the league between Seattle and Chicago, the allocations looked to be effective for at least the first two NWSL seasons, though this was later shown to be not true as Keelin Winters, who was involved in said trade, was signed as a free agent in the 2013-14 offseason. The 2014 Allocation was reduced to 50 players, Mexico dropping eight slots and the United States adding three. Since 2016, Mexico has not allocated players to the NWSL.

NWSL Team of the Month

The National Women's Soccer League Team of the Month is a monthly soccer award given to individual players in the National Women's Soccer League. NWSL Media Association, composed of journalists who regularly cover the league, selected a Best XI of players who were deemed to have put in the best performances over the past month. This award began in 2017.

NWSL awards

The National Women's Soccer League hands out a number of annual awards. Six were awarded for the inaugural season in 2013, including: Golden Boot, Most Valuable Player, Defender of the Year, Goalkeeper of the Year, Rookie of the Year, and Coach of the Year. The awards are voted on by media (25%), coaches/owners (25%), and players (50%).

In addition, NWSL Best XI and NWSL Second XI teams are named and voted on by journalists, club officials and NWSL players. Voters for the Best XI named selections for four defenders and a combination of six midfielders and forwards; with a minimum of one and maximum of three forwards. The Goalkeeper of the Year is automatically named to the Best XI. The NWSL Second XI team is composed of the subsequent vote recipient leaders at each position who did not make the Best XI.

Nike Tiempo

Nike Tiempo is a sports brand designed by Nike and targeted at football players. The range includes football boots, along with associated shorts, training kits and shin guards under the same label.

Zach Ertz

Zachary Adam Ertz (born November 10, 1990) is an American football tight end for the Philadelphia Eagles of the National Football League (NFL). He was drafted by the Eagles in the second round of the 2013 NFL draft and later won Super Bowl LII with the team over the New England Patriots. He played college football at Stanford, where he was recognized as a unanimous All-American.

Match Date Location Opponent Lineup Result Competition
2015 FIFA Women's World Cup
1
2015-06-08[84] Winnipeg, Canada  Australia Start 3–1 W Group stage
2
2015-06-12[85] Winnipeg, Canada  Sweden Start 0–0 D Group stage
3
2015-06-16[86] Vancouver, Canada  Nigeria Start 1–0 W Group stage
4
2015-06-22[87] Edmonton, Canada  Colombia Start 2–0 W Round of 16
5
2015-06-26[88] Ottawa, Canada  China PR Start 1–0 W Quarter-final
6
2015-06-30[89] Montreal, Canada GermanyGermany Start 2–0 W Semi-final
7
2015-07-05[52] Vancouver, Canada  Japan Start 5–2 W Final
2016 Women's Olympic Football Tournament
8
2016-08-03[90] Belo Horizonte, Brazil  New Zealand Start 2–0 W Group stage
2019 FIFA Women's World Cup
9
2019-06-11[91] Reims, France  Thailand Start 13–0 W Group stage
10
2019-06-13[92] Paris, France  Chile Start 3–0 W Group stage
11
2019-06-24[93] Reims, France  Spain Start 2–1 W Round of 16
12
2019-06-28[94] Paris, France  France Start 2–1 W Quarter-final
13
2019-07-02[95] Décines-Charpieu, France  England Start 2–1 W Semi-final
14
2019-07-07[96]  Netherlands Start 2–0 W Final
Key (expand for notes on “international goals” and sorting)
Location Geographic location of the venue where the competition occurred
Sorted by country name first, then by city name
Lineup Start – played entire match
on minute (off player) – substituted on at the minute indicated, and player was substituted off at the same time

off minute (on player) – substituted off at the minute indicated, and player was substituted on at the same time
(c) – captain
Sorted by minutes played

Goal in match Goal of total goals by the player in the match
Sorted by total goals followed by goal number
# NumberOfGoals.goalNumber scored by the player in the match (alternate notation to Goal in match)
Min The minute in the match the goal was scored. For list that include caps, blank indicates played in the match but did not score a goal.
Assist/pass The ball was passed by the player, which assisted in scoring the goal. This column depends on the availability and source of this information.
penalty or pk Goal scored on penalty-kick which was awarded due to foul by opponent. (Goals scored in penalty-shoot-out, at the end of a tied match after extra-time, are not included.)
Score The match score after the goal was scored.
Sorted by goal difference, then by goal scored by the player's team
Result The final score.

Sorted by goal difference in the match, then by goal difference in penalty-shoot-out if it is taken, followed by goal scored by the player's team in the match, then by goal scored in the penalty-shoot-out. For matches with identical final scores, match ending in extra-time without penalty-shoot-out is a tougher match, therefore precede matches that ended in regulation

aet The score at the end of extra-time; the match was tied at the end of 90' regulation
pso Penalty-shoot-out score shown in parenthesis; the match was tied at the end of extra-time
Light-purple background colorexhibition or closed door international friendly match
Light-yellow background color – match at an invitational tournament
Light-orange background color – Olympic women's football qualification match
Light-blue background color – FIFA women's world cup qualification match
Pink background color – Continental Games or regional tournament
Orange background color – Olympic women's football tournament
Blue background color – FIFA women's world cup final tournament
NOTE on background colors: Continental Games or regional tournament are sometimes also qualifier for World Cup or Olympics; information depends on the source such as the player's federation.

NOTE: some keys may not apply for a particular football player


Goal
Date Location Opponent Lineup # Min Assist/pass Score Result Competition
1 2015-03-11[m 2] Faro  France Start 1.1 7 Lauren Holiday

1–0

2–0

Algarve Cup: Final
2 2015-04-04[m 3] St. Louis  New Zealand Start 1.1 78 Lauren Holiday

3–0

4–0

Friendly
3 2015-05-10[m 4] San Jose  Republic of Ireland Start 1.1 54 Lauren Holiday

3–0

3–0

Friendly
4 2015-08-16[m 5] Pittsburgh  Costa Rica

off 45' (on Engen)

1.1 36 Megan Rapinoe

3–0

8–0

Friendly
5 2015-09-20[m 6] Birmingham  Haiti

off 45' (on Engen)

1.1 1 Kelley O'Hara

1–0

8–0

Friendly
6 2016-04-10[m 7] Chester  Colombia Start 2.1 42 Tobin Heath

2–0

3–0

Friendly
7 2.2 79 Tobin Heath

3–0

8 2016-06-05[m 8] Cleveland  Japan Start 1.1 27 Allie Long

1–0

2–0

Friendly
9 2017-07-31[m 9] San Diego  Brazil on 57' (off Smith) 1.1 89 Carli Lloyd

4–3

4–3

2017 Tournament of Nations
10 2017-09-15[m 10] Commerce City  New Zealand Start 2.1 16 Lindsey Horan

1–0

3–1

Friendly
11 2.2 24 unassisted

2–0

12 2017-10-19[m 11] New Orleans  South Korea Start 1.1 24 Megan Rapinoe

1–0

3–1

Friendly
13 2017-10-22[m 12] Cary  South Korea Start 1.1 45+1 Lindsey Horan

4–0

6–0

Friendly
14 2017-11-12[m 13] San Jose  Canada

off 75' (on Sullivan)

1.1 11 Megan Rapinoe

1–0

3–1

Friendly
15 2018-01-21[m 14] San Diego  Denmark Start 1.1 19 Tierna Davidson

2–1

5–1

Friendly
16 2018-08-02 Bridgeview  Brazil Start 1.1 53 Tobin Heath

2–1

4–1

2018 Tournament of Nations
17 2018-10-04[m 15] Cary  Mexico Start 1.1 47 Lindsay Horan

2–0

6–0

2018 CONCACAF Championship
18 2018-10-14[m 16] Frisco  Jamaica

off 46' (on Brian)

1.1 21 Crystal Dunn

3–0

6–0

2018 CONCACAF Championship Semi-final
19 2019-06-16 Paris  Chile Start 1.1 26 Tierna Davidson 2-0 3-0 2019 FIFA Women's World Cup Group stage
Chicago Red Stars – current squad

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