Jud Newborn

Jud Newborn (born in 1952), is a New York-based author, lecturer, cultural anthropologist and curator. A pioneer in the creation of Holocaust museums, he helped build New York's Museum of Jewish Heritage, serving as its Founding Historian and curator. He is known for his co-authored book, Sophie Scholl and the White Rose (Oneworld Publications, 2006), an account of the history of the White Rose, a group formed in part by German Christian students—some former Hitler Youth fanatics—who were part of the German anti-Nazi resistance.

Newborn is also a wide-ranging lecturer who has spoken throughout North America and worldwide. He is known for dramatic multimedia programs that set unsung aspects of the Holocaust, among other subjects, within the context of such compelling, contemporary issues as the rise of extremism, oppression, fanaticism and genocide, in order to inspire audiences to join in the fight for freedom and "our shared humanity."

Newborn's involvement with the holocaust began at age 5 when he was discovered a sepia family photograph which his grandmother had hidden away. When he brought it to her and asked who the people in it were, "her face turned bright red. Tears welled in her eyes. And she said in her Yiddish accent, 'Dunt ask me. Hitler burnt dem all.'" [1]

Jud Newborn was educated at New York University, Cambridge University and the University of Chicago, which awarded him his doctorate with Distinction in 1994 for his dissertation, "Work Makes Free": The Hidden Cultural Meanings of the Holocaust; (Work Makes Free: English translation of Nazi forced labor camp slogan Arbeit Macht Frei).

References

  1. ^ Story of courage amid horrors of Holocaust Newsday March 27, 2013

External links

Hans Scholl

Hans Fritz Scholl (22 September 1918 – 22 February 1943) was a founding member of the White Rose resistance movement in Nazi Germany. He was executed by the Nazis.

Ingrid Pitt

Ingoushka Pitt (née Petrov; 21 November 1937 – 23 November 2010), known professionally as Ingrid Pitt, was a Polish-British actress, author, and writer best known for her work in horror films of the 1960s and 1970s.

Lilo Ramdohr

Lieselotte ″Lilo″ Fürst-Ramdohr (11 October 1913 – 13 May 2013) was a member of the Munich branch of the student resistance group White Rose (Weiße Rose) in Nazi Germany. She was born in Aschersleben.

Newborn (surname)

Newborn is a surname. Notable people with the surname include:

Ira Newborn (born 1949), American composer

Jud Newborn (born 1952), American author

Lin Newborn (1974-1998), murder victim

Phineas Newborn, Sr., jazz big band leader in Memphis. His sons:

Phineas Newborn, Jr. (1931-1989), jazz pianist

Calvin Newborn (1933–2018), American jazz guitarist

Sophie Scholl

Sophia Magdalena Scholl (9 May 1921 – 22 February 1943) was a German student and anti-Nazi political activist, active within the White Rose non-violent resistance group in Nazi Germany.She was convicted of high treason after having been found distributing anti-war leaflets at the University of Munich (LMU) with her brother, Hans. As a result, she was executed by guillotine. Since the 1970s, Scholl has been extensively commemorated for her anti-Nazi resistance work.

Sophie Scholl – The Final Days

Sophie Scholl – The Final Days (German: Sophie Scholl – Die letzten Tage) is a 2005 German historical drama film directed by Marc Rothemund and written by Fred Breinersdorfer. It is about the last days in the life of Sophie Scholl, a 21-year-old member of the anti-Nazi non-violent student resistance group the White Rose, part of the German Resistance movement. She was found guilty of high treason by the People’s Court and executed the same day, 22 February 1943.

The film was presented at the 65th Berlin International Film Festival in February 2005 and won Silver Bear awards for Best Director and Best Actress (Julia Jentsch). It was nominated for an Academy Award for Best Foreign Language Film.

White Rose

The White Rose (German: die Weiße Rose) was a non-violent, intellectual resistance group in the Third Reich led by a group of students and a professor at the University of Munich. The group conducted an anonymous leaflet and graffiti campaign which called for active opposition to the Nazi party regime. Their activities started in Munich on 27 June 1942, and ended with the arrest of the core group by the Gestapo on 18 February 1943. They, as well as other members and supporters of the group who carried on distributing the pamphlets, faced show trials by the Nazi People's Court (Volksgerichtshof), and many of them were sentenced to death or imprisonment.

The group wrote, printed and initially distributed their pamphlets in the greater Munich region. Later on, secret carriers brought copies to other cities, mostly in the southern parts of Germany. In total, the White Rose authored six leaflets, which were multiplied and spread, in a total of about 15,000 copies. They denounced the Nazi regime's crimes and oppression, and called for resistance. In their second leaflet, they openly denounced the persecution and mass murder of the Jews. By the time of their arrest, the members of the White Rose were just about to establish contacts with other German resistance groups like the Kreisau Circle or the Schulze-Boysen/Harnack group of the Red Orchestra. Today, the White Rose is well-known both within Germany and worldwide.

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