José Froilán González

José Froilán González (October 5, 1922 – June 15, 2013) was an Argentine racing driver, particularly notable for scoring Ferrari's first win in a Formula One World Championship race at the 1951 British Grand Prix. He made his Formula One debut for Scuderia Achille Varzi in the 1950 Monaco Grand Prix. His last Grand Prix was the 1960 Argentine Grand Prix.

González competed in 26 World Championship Formula One Grands Prix over nine seasons (1950–1957 and 1960) and numerous non-Championship events.[2] In the 26 World Championship races, González scored two victories (the 1951 British Grand Prix and the 1954 British Grand Prix), seven second-place finishes, six third-place finishes, three pole positions, six fastest laps, and 72 ​17 points. He won the 1951 Coppa Acerbo, in 1954 the 24 Hours of Le Mans with Maurice Trintignant, and the Portuguese Grand Prix for Ferrari.

González's nicknames were The Pampas Bull (by his English fans) and El Cabezón (Fat Head, by his close colleagues).

José Froilán González
José Froilán González 1950
Born5 October 1922
Arrecifes, Argentina
Died15 June 2013 (aged 90)
Buenos Aires, Argentina
Formula One World Championship career
NationalityArgentina Argentine
Active years19501957, 1960
TeamsMaserati, Talbot-Lago, Ferrari, Vanwall
Entries26
Championships0
Wins2
Podiums15
Career points72 ​17 (77 ​914)[1]
Pole positions3
Fastest laps6
First entry1950 Monaco Grand Prix
First win1951 British Grand Prix
Last win1954 British Grand Prix
Last entry1960 Argentine Grand Prix
24 Hours of Le Mans career
Years19501951, 19531954
TeamsAutomobiles Gordini
Henri Louveau
Scuderia Lancia
Scuderia Ferrari
Best finish1st (1954)

Sixtieth anniversary tribute

Froilan Gonzalez Ferrari 500
González demonstrating a Ferrari 500 in 2000

On 10 July 2011, during the British Grand Prix meeting, González was honoured by the Ferrari team and the FIA on the 60th anniversary of Ferrari's first Formula One World Championship race victory. As part of the celebration, Ferrari driver Fernando Alonso drove González' Ferrari 375 F1 for four laps of the Silverstone track. Later that day, Alonso won the British Grand Prix in his Ferrari 150° Italia.

Death

He died in Buenos Aires from respiratory failure, aged 90, after a downturn in health following a heart attack earlier in 2013.[3] [4]

Racing record

Complete Formula One World Championship results

(key) (Races in bold indicate pole position; races in italics indicate fastest lap)

Year Entrant Chassis Engine 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 WDC Pts.[1]
1950 Scuderia Achille Varzi Maserati 4CLT/48 Maserati L4C GBR MON
Ret
500 SUI BEL FRA
Ret
ITA NC 0
1951 José Froilán González Talbot-Lago T26C-GS Talbot L6 SUI
Ret
500 3rd 24
(27)
Enrico Platé Maserati 4CLT/48 Maserati L4 BEL
DNA
Scuderia Ferrari Ferrari 375 Ferrari V12 FRA
2*
GBR
1
GER
3
ITA
2
ESP
2
1952 Officine Alfieri Maserati Maserati A6GCM Maserati L6 SUI 500 BEL FRA GBR GER NED ITA
2**
9th 6 ​12
1953 Officine Alfieri Maserati Maserati A6GCM Maserati L6 ARG
3
500 NED
3*
BEL
Ret
FRA
3
GBR
4**
GER SUI ITA 6th 13 ​12
(14 ​12)
1954 Scuderia Ferrari Ferrari 625 Ferrari L4 ARG
3
500 BEL
4*
GBR
1
GER
2*
SUI
2
ITA
3*
ESP 2nd 25 ​17
(26 ​914)
Ferrari 553 Ferrari L4 FRA
Ret
1955 Scuderia Ferrari Ferrari 625 Ferrari L4 ARG
2*
MON 500 BEL NED GBR ITA 17th 2
1956 Officine Alfieri Maserati Maserati 250F Maserati L6 ARG
Ret
MON 500 BEL FRA NC 0
Vandervell Products Ltd. Vanwall Vanwall L4 GBR
Ret
GER ITA
1957 Scuderia Ferrari Lancia-Ferrari D50 Ferrari V8 ARG
5*
MON 500 FRA GBR GER PES ITA 21st 1
1960 Scuderia Ferrari Ferrari Dino 246 Ferrari V6 ARG
10
MON 500 NED BEL FRA GBR POR ITA USA NC 0

* Shared drive.
** Joint fastest lap.
González started the race in a Ferrari 553 Squalo, but took over one of his teammates' 625 during the race.

Complete 24 Hours of Le Mans results

1950 Simca Gordini T15s
1950 Simca Gordini T15s, as raced, and retired, at the 1950 24 Hours of Le Mans by José Froilán González and Juan Manuel Fangio
Year Team Co-Drivers Car Class Laps Pos. Class
Pos.
1950 France Automobiles Gordini Argentina Juan Manuel Fangio Simca-Gordini T15S Compresseur S 3.0 95 DNF DNF
1951 France Henri Louveau Argentina Onofre Marimón Talbot-Lago T26 GS S 5.0 128 DNF DNF
1953 Italy Scuderia Lancia Italy Clemente Biondetti Lancia D.20 Compressor S 8.0 213 DNF DNF
1954 Italy Scuderia Ferrari France Maurice Trintignant Ferrari 375 Plus S 5.0 302 1st 1st

References

  1. ^ a b Up until 1990, not all points scored by a driver contributed to their final World Championship tally (see list of points scoring systems for more information). Number without parentheses are Championship points; numbers in parentheses are total points scored.
  2. ^ "The Formula One Archives". Retrieved 2007-07-25.
  3. ^ "Jose Froilan Gonzalez, Ferrari's first GP winner, dies at age 90". Retrieved 14 June 2013.
  4. ^ Brown, Allen. "Jose Froilan Gonzalez". oldracingcars.com. Retrieved 14 August 2018.

External links

Sporting positions
Preceded by
Tony Rolt
Duncan Hamilton
Winner of the 24 Hours of Le Mans
1954 with:
Maurice Trintignant
Succeeded by
Mike Hawthorn
Ivor Bueb
Preceded by
Mike Hawthorn
BRDC International Trophy winner
1954
Succeeded by
Peter Collins
Records
Preceded by
Geoffrey Crossley
29 years, 2 days
(1950 British GP)
Youngest driver to start
a Formula One race

27 years, 228 days
(1950 Monaco Grand Prix)
Succeeded by
Troy Ruttman
20 years, 80 days
(1950 Indianapolis 500)
Preceded by
Manny Ayulo
29 years, 221 days
(1951 Indianapolis 500)
Youngest driver to score a
podium position in Formula One

28 years, 269 days
(1951 French Grand Prix)
Succeeded by
Troy Ruttman
22 years, 80 days
(1952 Indianapolis 500)
Preceded by
Walt Faulkner
30 years, 103 days
(1950 Indianapolis 500)
Youngest Grand Prix polesitter
28 years, 282 days
(1951 British Grand Prix)
Succeeded by
Jerry Hoyt
26 years, 121 days
(1955 Indianapolis 500)
Preceded by
Johnnie Parsons
31 years, 330 days
(1950 Indianapolis 500)
Youngest Grand Prix
race winner

28 years, 282 days
(1951 British Grand Prix)
Succeeded by
Troy Ruttman
22 years, 80 days
(1952 Indianapolis 500)
Preceded by
Johnnie Parsons
31 years, 330 days
(1950 Indianapolis 500)
Youngest driver to set
fastest lap in Formula One

29 years, 338 days
(1952 Italian Grand Prix)
Succeeded by
Hans Herrmann
26 years, 131 days
(1954 French GP)
Preceded by
Alberto Ascari
33 years, 107 days
(1951 season)
Youngest Formula One
World Drivers' Championship runner-up

32 years, 19 days
(1954 season)
Succeeded by
Stirling Moss
25 years, 302 days
(1955 season)
1950 Albi Grand Prix

The 1950 Albi Grand Prix (officially known as XII Circuit de l'Albigeois) was a non-championship Formula One Grand Prix held on 16 July 1950. It was the fourteenth Grand Prix of the year, counting both championship and non-championship races.

The race was contested over two heats of 17 laps after which the times were aggregated. The winner was Louis Rosier in a Talbot-Lago after finishing third and second in respectively Heat 1 and Heat 2. José Froilán González finished second in a Maserati 4CLT-48 and Maurice Trintignant came in third in a Simca-Gordini T15.

1951 British Grand Prix

The 1951 British Grand Prix was a Formula One motor race held on 14 July 1951 at the Silverstone Circuit in Northamptonshire, England. It was race 5 of 8 in the 1951 World Championship of Drivers and was contested over 90 laps. The race was the first victory for José Froilán González, and was also the first of many for the Scuderia Ferrari team. Both the team and driver also achieved their first ever pole position during the weekend.

1951 German Grand Prix

The 1951 German Grand Prix was a Formula One motor race held on 29 July 1951 at the Nürburgring Nordschleife. It was race 6 of 8 in the 1951 World Championship of Drivers.

1951 Italian Grand Prix

The 1951 Italian Grand Prix was a Formula One motor race held on 16 September 1951 at Monza. It was race 7 of 8 in the 1951 World Championship of Drivers.

1951 Spanish Grand Prix

The 1951 Spanish Grand Prix was a Formula One motor race held on 28 October 1951 at Pedralbes Circuit. It was the eighth and final race of the 1951 World Championship of Drivers.

This race was determined by tyre choice – Ferrari chose a 16 inch rear wheel, whilst Alfa Romeo settled for the 18 inch, which proved to be the better of the two options.

Juan Manuel Fangio led Alberto Ascari by two points before the race. Ascari led the race from José Froilán González, but the Ferraris suffered numerous tread problems. Piero Taruffi threw a tyre tread on lap 6 and was followed on lap 7 by Luigi Villoresi, Ascari on lap 8 and Gonzalez on lap 14. The Ferraris were forced to stop frequently to change tyres and Fangio comfortably won the race and his first drivers' title, after Ascari finished 4th was not able to overhaul Fangio's total. After the race, Alfa Romeo announced that due to lack of finances, they would not be competing in the 1952 season.

1952 Italian Grand Prix

The 1952 Italian Grand Prix was a Formula Two race held on 7 September 1952 at Monza. It was the eighth and final round of the 1952 World Championship of Drivers, in which each Grand Prix was run to Formula Two rules rather than the Formula One regulations normally used. The 80-lap race was won by Ferrari driver Alberto Ascari after he started from pole position. José Froilán González finished second for the Maserati team and Ascari's teammate Luigi Villoresi came in third.

1953 Argentine Grand Prix

The 1953 Argentine Grand Prix was race 1 of 9 in the 1953 World Championship of Drivers, which was run to Formula Two regulations in 1952 and 1953. The race was held in Buenos Aires on January 18, 1953, at the Autódromo Galvez (official name: Autódromo Juan y Óscar Gálvez, also known as the Autódromo 17 de Octubre) as the first official Formula One race in South America and outside of Europe. Previously, the Indianapolis 500 (part of the Formula One championship calendar from 1950 to 1960) was the only Formula One championship race held outside Europe but run to AAA regulations.

1953 Belgian Grand Prix

The 1953 Belgian Grand Prix was a Formula Two race held on 21 June 1953 at Circuit de Spa-Francorchamps. It was race 4 of 9 in the 1953 World Championship of Drivers, which was run to Formula Two rules in 1952 and 1953, rather than the Formula One regulations normally used. The 36-lap race was won by Ferrari driver Alberto Ascari after he started from second position. His teammate Luigi Villoresi finished second and Maserati driver Onofre Marimón came in third.

1953 Dutch Grand Prix

The 1953 Dutch Grand Prix was a Formula Two race held on 7 June 1953 at the Circuit Zandvoort. It was race 3 of 9 in the 1953 World Championship of Drivers, which was run to Formula Two rules in 1952 and 1953, rather than the Formula One regulations normally used. The 90-lap race was won by Ferrari driver Alberto Ascari after he started from pole position. His teammate Nino Farina finished second and Maserati drivers José Froilán González and Felice Bonetto came in third

1954 Argentine Grand Prix

The 1954 Argentine Grand Prix was a Formula One motor race held at Autódromo 17 de Octubre in Buenos Aires, Argentina on 17 January 1954. It was race 1 of 9 in the 1954 World Championship of Drivers.

This was Juan Manuel Fangio's first home victory, following Alberto Ascari's win in 1953. He would repeat this with three consecutive victories in the following three years.

1954 Belgian Grand Prix

The 1954 Belgian Grand Prix was a Formula One motor race held at Spa-Francorchamps on 20 June 1954. It was race 3 of 9 in the 1954 World Championship of Drivers. The 36-lap race was won by Maserati driver Juan Manuel Fangio after he started from pole position. Maurice Trintignant finished second for the Ferrari team with Fangio's teammate Stirling Moss in third.

1954 British Grand Prix

The 1954 British Grand Prix was a Formula One motor race held at Silverstone on 17 July 1954. It was race 5 of 9 in the 1954 World Championship of Drivers. The 90-lap race was won by Ferrari driver José Froilán González after he started from second position. His teammate Mike Hawthorn finished second and Maserati driver Onofre Marimón came in third.

1954 Formula One season

The 1954 Formula One season was eighth season of FIA Formula One motor racing. It featured the 1954 World Championship of Drivers and a number of non-championship races. The World Championship of Drivers was contested over a nine race series which commenced on 17 January and ended on 24 October 1954. The championship was won by Juan Manuel Fangio who drove, and won races, for both Maserati and Mercedes-Benz over the course of the series. Argentine drivers gained the first two positions in the championship with José Froilán González placing second to his compatriot Fangio.

1954 German Grand Prix

The 1954 German Grand Prix was a Formula One motor race held at Nürburgring on 1 August 1954. It was race 6 of 9 in the 1954 World Championship of Drivers. It was the 17th German Grand Prix since the race was first held in 1926 and the 16th to be held at the Nürburgring complex of circuits. The race was won by 1951 world champion, Argentine driver Juan Manuel Fangio driving a Mercedes-Benz W196. Ferrari 625 drivers Mike Hawthorn (in a shared drive with José Froilán González) and Maurice Trintignant finished second and third for Scuderia Ferrari.

1954 Italian Grand Prix

The 1954 Italian Grand Prix was a Formula One motor race held on 5 September 1954 at Monza. It was race 8 of 9 in the 1954 World Championship of Drivers. The 80-lap race was won by Mercedes driver Juan Manuel Fangio after he started from pole position. Mike Hawthorn finished second for the Ferrari team and his teammates Umberto Maglioli and José Froilán González came in third.

1954 Swiss Grand Prix

The 1954 Swiss Grand Prix was a Formula One motor race held at Bremgarten on 22 August 1954. It was race 7 of 9 in the 1954 World Championship of Drivers. The 66-lap race was won by Mercedes driver Juan Manuel Fangio after he started from second position. José Froilán González finished second for the Ferrari team and Fangio's teammate Hans Herrmann came in third.

1955 Argentine Grand Prix

The 1955 Argentine Grand Prix was a Formula One motor race held at Buenos Aires on January 16, 1955. It was race 1 of 7 in the 1955 World Championship of Drivers.

The race was won from third on the grid by Juan Manuel Fangio for Mercedes. Ferrari drivers Nino Farina and Maurice Trintignant finished both second and third in two three-way shared drives with José Froilán González and Umberto Maglioli respectively. The high temperatures of the Argentinian summer proved to be very taxing for both drivers and cars. Fangio and Roberto Mieres were the only two drivers able to complete the race without handing their car to another driver.

Ferrari 375 F1

See also the 340 and 375 road cars sharing the same engineAfter finding only modest success with the supercharged 125 F1 car in Formula One, Ferrari decided to switch for 1950 to the naturally aspirated 4.5-litre formula for the series. Calling in Aurelio Lampredi to replace Gioacchino Colombo as technical director, Enzo Ferrari directed that the company work in stages to grow and develop an entirely new large-displacement V12 engine for racing.

The first outcome of Lampredi's work was the experimental 275 S. Just two of these racing barchettas were built, based on the 166 MM but using the experimental 3.3-litre V12. These were raced at the Mille Miglia of 1950 on April 23. Although one car held the overall lead for a time, both were forced to retire with mechanical failure before the end.

The 275 F1 made its debut at the Grand Prix of Belgium on June 18, sporting the same 3.3-litre (3322 cc/202 in³) version of Lampredi's new engine. With three Weber 42DCF carburetors, a single overhead camshaft for each bank of cylinders, and two valves per cylinder, the engine produced a capable 300 hp (224 kW) at 7200 rpm. Alberto Ascari drove the car to fifth place, marking the end of the 3.3-litre engine.

The 275 was replaced at the Grand Prix of Nations at Geneva on July 30, 1950 by the 340 F1. As the name suggests, the car sported a larger 4.1-litre (4101.66 cc/250 in³) version of Lampredi's V12. Other changes included a new de Dion tube rear suspension based on that in the 166 F2 car and four-speed gearbox. It had a longer 2,420 mm (95 in) wheelbase, but other dimensions remained the same. With 335 hp (250 kW), Ascari was able to keep up with the Alfa Romeo 158 of Juan Manuel Fangio but retired with engine trouble. Although the 340 proved itself capable, it was only the middle step in Ferrari's 1950 car development.

Ferrari achieved the 4.5-litre goal of the formula with the 375 F1, two of which debuted at Monza on September 3, 1950. This 4.5-litre (4493.73 cc/274 in³) engine produced roughly the same power as its 4.1-litre predecessor, but its tractability earned Ascari second place in that debut race. A series of modifications through the 1951 season allowed Ferrari to finally put Alfa Romeo behind it in a Formula One race, with José Froilán González' victory at Silverstone on July 14 becoming the constructor's first World Championship win. Ascari's wins at the Nürburgring and Monza and strong finishes throughout the season cemented the company's position as a Formula One contender.

Changes in the Formula One regulations led the company to shift the big engine to an Indy car, the 1952 375 Indianapolis. Three new Weber 40IF4C carburettors brought power output to 380 hp (279 kW), the wheelbase was lengthened, and the chassis and suspension were strengthened. Although the car performed well in European testing, it was not able to meet the American challenge, with just one of four 375s even qualifying for the 1952 Indianapolis 500. Ascari was the driver who did qualify the car for the race, starting 25th (out of 33 starters) with a qualifying speed of 134.3 mp/h (the pole was won by American Chet Miller who pushed his supercharged Kurtis Kraft-Novi to 139.03 mp/h). Ascari would be classified in 31st place, completing only 40 of the 200 laps before being forced to retire with wheel failure, though he would go on to win the remaining six Grands Prix of the season to easily win his first World Championship from Ferrari teammate Giuseppe Farina.

The big V12 was scrapped for 1954, as Formula One required a 2.5-litre engine. The new 553 F1 adopted Lampredi's four cylinder engine, leaving the V12 for sports car use.

The 375 was driven during the 2011 British Grand Prix weekend by then-current Ferrari driver Fernando Alonso as a tribute to the sixtieth anniversary of the Ferrari's first World Championship Grand Prix win at the 1951 British Grand Prix at Silverstone, with Argentinean driver José Froilán González driving at the time.

Maserati A6GCM

The Maserati A6GCM is a single seater racing car from the Italian manufacturer Maserati. Developed for Formula Two, 12 cars were built between 1951 and 1953.

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