Jorge González von Marées

Jorge González von Marées (April 5, 1900 – March 14, 1962) El Jefe (Spanish: The chief, analogous to the Führer) was a Chilean political figure and author.

Born in Santiago of a German mother. He was ideologically influenced by Oswald Spengler. On April 5, 1932 he founded the Movimiento Nacional Socialista de Chile (MNS, National Socialist Movement of Chile) to oppose Democratism, Americanism, and Communism.

González von Marées organized a failed coup attempt on September 5, 1938, in which 58 young nacista members were shot to death by police, in what became known as the Seguro Obrero massacre. He was sentenced to 20 years imprisonment, but subsequently pardoned by President Aguirre.

Jorge González Von Marées color
Jorge González von Marées

Works

  • González von Marées, Jorge (1932). La concepción nacista del Estado. Santiago, Chile.
  • González von Marées, Jorge (1937). El problema del hambre. Santiago, Chile: Editorial Ercilla.
  • González von Marées, Jorge (1939). Pueblo y Estado. Santiago, Chile.
  • González von Marées, Jorge (1940). El mal de Chile: Sus causas y remedios. Santiago, Chile: Ediciones Diego Portales.[1]

See also

References

  • Nacismo: National Socialism in Chile 1932-1938 by M. Potashnik, Ph.D. dissertation, University of California, Los Angeles 1974.
  • Jorge González von Marées: Chief of Chilean Nacism by George F. W. Young, an article in Jahrbuch für Geschichte von Staat, Wirtschaft und Gesellschaft Lateinamerikas, Band 11, 1974
  • The National Socialist Movement of Chile by H.E. Bicheno, Cambridge University thesis, 1976
  • Biographical Dictionary of the Extreme Right Since 1890 edited by Philip Rees, 1991, ISBN 0-13-089301-3
  • Black Sun: Aryan Cults, Esoteric Nazism and the Politics of Identity (Chap. 9) by Nicholas Goodrick-Clarke, 2001, ISBN 0-8147-3155-4
  • The Tragedy of Chile by Robert J. Alexander, Westport, Conn. : Greenwood Press, 1978 ISBN 0-313-20034-3
  1. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2009-06-22. Retrieved 2009-06-07.CS1 maint: Archived copy as title (link)

External links

1900 in Chile

The following lists events that happened during 1900 in Chile.

1962 in Chile

The following lists events that happened during 1962 in Chile.

Argentine Patriotic League

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Blueshirts (Falange)

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Carlos Keller

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Crypto-fascism

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Faisceau

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Fascio

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Heroic capitalism

Heroic capitalism or dynamic capitalism was a concept that Italian Fascism took from Werner Sombart's explanations of capitalist development. This phase was known by Sombart as early capitalism. In 1933, Benito Mussolini claimed that capitalism began with dynamic or heroic capitalism (1830-1870) followed by static capitalism (1870-1914) and then reached its final form of decadent capitalism, known also as supercapitalism, which began in 1914.Mussolini argued that although he did not support this type of capitalism he considered it at least a dynamic and heroic form. Some Fascists, including Mussolini, considered it a contribution to the industrialism and technical developments, but they claimed not to favour the creation of supercapitalism in Italy due to its strong agricultural sector.Mussolini claimed that dynamic or heroic capitalism inevitably degenerates into static capitalism and then supercapitalism due to the concepts of bourgeois economic individualism. Instead, he proposed a state supervised economy, although he contrasted it to Russian state supercapitalism. Italian Fascism presented the economic system of corporatism as the solution that would preserve private initiatives and property while allowing the state and the syndicalist movement to intervene in the economy in the matters where private initiative intervenes in public affairs. This system would lead also to some nationalizations when necessary and the greatest participation of the employees in all the aspects of the company and in the utility given by the company.

List of fascist movements by country

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This list has been divided into four sections for reasons of length:

List of fascist movements by country A–F

List of fascist movements by country G–M

List of fascist movements by country N–T

List of fascist movements by country U–Z

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Popular Socialist Vanguard

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