Jonna Andersson

Jonna Ann-Charlotte Andersson (born 2 January 1993) is a Swedish football defender who plays for English club Chelsea and the Sweden women's national football team.

Jonna Andersson
Jonna Andersson
Personal information
Full name Jonna Ann-Charlotte Andersson[1]
Date of birth 2 January 1993 (age 26)
Place of birth Mjölby, Sweden
Height 167 cm (5 ft 6 in)[1]
Playing position Defender
Club information
Current team
Chelsea
Number 20
Youth career
Mjölby AI FF
Senior career*
Years Team Apps (Gls)
2009–2017 Linkopings 114 (13)
2018– Chelsea 18 (4)
National team
2016– Sweden 40 (0)
* Senior club appearances and goals counted for the domestic league only and correct as of 15:57, 20 November 2018 (UTC)
‡ National team caps and goals correct as of 15:50, 20 May 2018 (UTC+1)

Club career

Andersson signed for Linköpings FC in 2009 and made two league appearances in her first season as the club won the Damallsvenskan title. After three seasons where she was mainly a substitute, in the 2013 season she became an important starting player on the team.[2]

International career

As a Sweden under-19 international Andersson featured at the 2012 UEFA Women's U-19 Championship in Turkey.[3] Sweden won the tournament by beating Spain 1–0 in the final after extra time.[4]

National team coach Pia Sundhage called up Andersson for the first time in January 2016 for a friendly against Scotland, as a replacement for Amanda Ilestedt who had a back injury. She played at left-back as the Scots were drubbed 6–0 at Prioritet Serneke Arena.[5] Andersson retained her place in the squad for the 2016 UEFA Women's Olympic Qualifying Tournament.[6]

Honours

References

  1. ^ a b "FIFA Women's World Cup France 2019™ List of Players - Sweden" (PDF). FIFA. 27 May 2019. p. 22. Retrieved 27 May 2019.
  2. ^ "# 25 Jonna Andersson" (in Swedish). Linköpings FC. Retrieved 20 February 2016.
  3. ^ Hammarlund, Pauline (13 July 2012). "Hammarlund's inside track on finalists Sweden". Antalya: UEFA. Retrieved 20 February 2016.
  4. ^ Crompton, Sam (15 July 2012). "Sweden match-winner Diaz realises dream". Uefa.com. UEFA. Retrieved 11 September 2013.
  5. ^ "Debutant ersätter Ilestedt" (in Swedish). Swedish Football Association. 20 January 2016. Archived from the original on 25 February 2016. Retrieved 20 February 2016.
  6. ^ "Truppen till OS-kvalet" (in Swedish). Swedish Football Association. 16 February 2016. Retrieved 20 February 2016.

External links

2012 UEFA Women's Under-19 Championship

The UEFA Women's U-19 Championship 2012 Final Tournament was held in Antalya, Turkey between 2 and 14 July 2012. Players born after 1 January 1993 were eligible to participate in this competition.

2018 FA Women's Cup Final

The 2018 FA Women's Cup Final was the 48th final of the FA Women's Cup, England's primary cup competition for women's football teams. The showpiece event was the 25th to be played directly under the auspices of the Football Association (FA) and was named the SSE Women's FA Cup Final due to sponsorship reasons.

The final was contested between Arsenal Ladies and Chelsea Ladies on 5 May 2018 at Wembley Stadium in London. The match was broadcast on BBC1. Chelsea won the match 3–1 in front of a record crowd of 45,423 to clinch their second title.

2019 FIFA Women's World Cup

The 2019 FIFA Women's World Cup was the eighth edition of the FIFA Women's World Cup, the quadrennial international football championship contested by 24 women's national teams representing member associations of FIFA. It took place between 7 June and 7 July 2019, with 52 matches staged in nine cities in France, which was awarded the right to host the event in March 2015, the first time the country hosted the tournament. The tournament was the first Women's World Cup to use the video assistant referee (VAR) system.

The United States entered the competition as defending champions after winning the 2015 edition in Canada and successfully defended their title with a 2–0 victory over the Netherlands in the final. In doing so, they secured their record fourth title and became the second nation, after Germany, to have successfully retained the title.

2019–20 Chelsea F.C. Women season

The 2019–20 season is Chelsea Women's 28th competitive season and 10th consecutive season in the FA Women's Super League and at the top flight of English women's football.

Anna Oskarsson

Anna Klara Ellen Oskarsson (also spelled Oscarsson; born 23 June 1996) is a Swedish footballer who plays as a defender for Linköping FC. She started with Jitex Mölndal BK as a youth player. Oskarsson has also represented FC Gute.Oskarsson represented Sweden in the U19 European Championships in Israel 2015 and the U20 World Championship in Papua New Guinea in 2016.

She made her debut for the senior national team at the 2018 Algarve Cup, substituting in for Jonna Andersson in the 77th minute of Sweden's opening fixture, a 3–1 win over Canada. A thigh injury sustained in December 2018 caused Oskarsson to drop out of national team contention in the run up to the 2019 FIFA Women's World Cup.

Chelsea F.C. Women

Chelsea Football Club Women, formerly known as Chelsea Ladies Football Club, are an English women's football club based in Fulham, England. Since 2004, the club has been affiliated with Chelsea F.C., a men's team in the Premier League. Chelsea Women were a founding member of the FA WSL in 2010, the top level of women's football in England since 2011. From 2005 to 2010, the side competed in the Premier League National Division, the top tier of women's football in England at the time.

Football at the 2016 Summer Olympics

The association football tournament at the 2016 Summer Olympics was held from 3 to 20 August in Brazil.In addition to the Olympic host city of Rio de Janeiro, matches were played in Belo Horizonte, Brasília, Salvador, São Paulo, and Manaus. All six cities hosted matches during the 2014 World Cup, with the Estádio Olímpico João Havelange in Rio the only Olympic venue not to have been a World Cup venue.Associations affiliated with FIFA might send teams to participate in the tournament. Men's teams were restricted to under-23 players (born on or after 1 January 1993) with a maximum of three overage players allowed, while there were no age restrictions on women's teams. The Games made use of about 400 footballs.

Football at the 2016 Summer Olympics – Women's tournament – Group E

Group E of the women's football tournament at the 2016 Summer Olympics was played from 3 to 9 August 2016, and included hosts Brazil, China, South Africa and Sweden. The top two teams advanced to the knockout stage, while the third-placed team also advanced if they were among the two best third-placed teams among all three groups.All times are BRT (UTC−3). For matches in Manaus, which is in AMT (UTC−4), local times are listed in parentheses.

Hammarby Fotboll (women)

Hammarby Idrottsförening Fotbollförening, commonly known as Hammarby IF, Hammarby Fotboll or simply Hammarby (Swedish pronunciation: [²hamːarˌbyː] or, especially locally, [-ˌbʏ]), is a women's association football team from Stockholm that currently competes in the Swedish second highest league Elitettan.

Hammarby play their home games at Hammarby IP (also called Kanalplan) in Stockholm, and occasionally at Zinkensdamms IP and Tele2 Arena.The team colours are green and white. Since 2016, the club has been affiliated with Hammarby Fotboll, a men's team in Allsvenskan. Hammarby is a member of the Stockholms Fotbollförbund through its parent club.

Jonna

Jonna may refer to:

Jonna Adlerteg (born 1995), Swedish gymnast

Jonna Andersson (born 1993), Swedish football defender

Jonna Fitzgerald, American beauty pageant titleholder and musical entertainer

Jonna Doolittle Hoppes, American author whose works include oral histories and biographies

Jonna Lee (actress) (born 1963), American television and film actress

Jonna Lee (singer) (born 1981), Swedish singer, songwriter, record producer and visual director

Jonna Liljendahl (born 1970), Swedish former child actress, played Madicken (by Astrid Lindgren)

Jonna Mannion (born 1988), American reality TV personality

Jonna Mazet (born 1967), American epidemiologist, Executive Director of the University of California, Davis One Health Institute

Jonna Mendes (born 1979), former World Cup alpine ski racer from the United States

Jonna Mendez (born 1945), the former Chief of Disguise in the CIA’s Office of Technical Service

Lena Maria Jonna Olin (born 1955), Swedish actress

Jonna Pirinen (born 1982), pop and R&B singer/songwriter from Finland

Jonna Tervomaa (born 1973), Finnish pop singer and songwriter

Jonna Tilgner (born 1984), German sprinter and hurdler who specialized in the 400 metres

List of FIFA Women's World Cup goalscorers

This article lists each country's goalscorers in the FIFA Women's World Cup. There are 373 goalscorers for the 917 goals scored at the 8 editions of the World Cup final tournaments.

17

Numbers in green means the player finished as the tournament top scorer (or joint top scorer).

List of FIFA Women's World Cup own goals

This is a list of all own goals scored during FIFA Women's World Cup matches (not including qualification games).

Nigeria and the United States have scored three own goals for their opponents, while Norway has benefited from four own goals. Of the 23 matches with own goals, the team scoring the own goal has won four times and drawn three times.The only player to score two own goals is Angie Ponce from Ecuador, scoring twice for Switzerland in 2015. She later scored Ecuador's first World Cup goals in the same match.

List of Olympic medalists in football

This is the complete list of Olympic medallists in football.

List of foreign FA Women's Super League players

The FA Women's Super League (FA WSL or WSL) is the highest league of women's football in England. The league, which started in 2011, was divided in two separate divisions (WSL 1 and WSL 2) from 2014; only the WSL 1 is considered in this list. The following players must meet both of the following two criteria:

Have played at least one FA WSL game. Players who were signed by WSL clubs, but only played in lower league, cup and/or European games, or did not play in any competitive games at all, are not included.

Are considered foreign, i.e., outside United Kingdom, or Ireland determined by the following:A player is considered foreign if she is not eligible to play for the national teams of England, Scotland, Wales, Northern Ireland or The Republic of IrelandMore specifically:

If a player has been capped on international level, the national team is used; if she has been capped by more than one country, the highest level (or the most recent) team is used. These include British/Irish players with dual citizenship.

If a player has not been capped on international level, her country of birth is used, except those who were born abroad from British parents or moved to the United Kingdom at a young age, and those who clearly indicated to have switched her nationality to another nation.Clubs listed are those for which the player has played at least one FA WSL game.

In bold: players who have played at least one FA WSL game in the current season (2018–19), and the clubs for which they have played. They include players who have subsequently left the club, but do not include current players of a WSL club who have not played a WSL game in the current season.

Last updated: FA WSL matches played on 24 March 2019.

Sweden at the 2016 Summer Olympics

Sweden competed at the 2016 Summer Olympics in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, from 3 to 20 August 2016. Swedish athletes have competed at every Summer Olympic Games in the modern era, except for the sparsely attended 1904 Summer Olympics in St. Louis. They extended their medal-winning streak to 47 straight Olympic Games by obtaining a silver in women's road race.

Sweden at the FIFA Women's World Cup

The Sweden women's national football team has represented Sweden at the FIFA Women's World Cup on eight occasions in 1991, 1995, 1999, 2003, 2007, 2011, 2015 and 2019. There were runners up once. and three times bronze medalists: in 1991, in 2011 and in 2019.

Sweden women's national football team

The Sweden women's national football team (Swedish: svenska damfotbollslandslaget) represents Sweden in international women's football competition and is controlled by the Swedish Football Association. The national team has won the European Competition for Women's Football in 1984, one World Cup-silver (2003), as well as three European Championship-silvers (1987, 1995, 2001). The team has participated in six Olympic Games, eight World Cups, as well as ten European Championships. Sweden won bronze medals at the World Cups in 1991, 2011 and 2019.

The 2003 World Cup-final was the second most watched event in Sweden that year. Lotta Schelin is the top goalscorer in the history of Sweden with 85 goals. Schelin surpassed Hanna Ljungberg's 72-goal record against Germany on 29 October 2014. The player with the most caps is Therese Sjögran, with 214. The team was coached by Thomas Dennerby from 2005 to 2012, and Pia Sundhage from 2012 to 2017. The head coach is Peter Gerhardsson.

After winning the two qualifying matches against Denmark for the Beijing 2008 Olympics, the Swedish Olympic Committee approved of record increases in investments for the women's team. The new budget granted over a million SEK (about US$150,000) for the team and 150,000 SEK (about US$25,000) per player for developing physical fitness. The new grants are almost a 100% increase of the 2005 and 2006 season funds.The developments and conditions of the Sweden women's national football team can be seen in the Sveriges Television documentary television series The Other Sport from 2013.

UEFA Women's Euro 2017 Group B

Group B of UEFA Women's Euro 2017 contained Germany, Italy, Russia and Sweden. The matches were played from 17 to 25 July 2017.

UEFA Women's Euro 2017 knockout stage

The knockout phase of UEFA Women's Euro 2017 began on 29 July 2017 and ended on 6 August 2017 with the final.All times local (UTC+2).

Chelsea F.C. Women – current squad

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