Johnny Vander Meer

John Samuel Vander Meer (November 2, 1914 – October 6, 1997) was an American professional baseball player.[1] He played in Major League Baseball as a pitcher, most notably for the Cincinnati Reds.[1] Vander Meer is best known for being the only pitcher in Major League Baseball history to throw two consecutive no-hitters.[2] After the impressive start to his major league career, he experienced problems controlling the accuracy of his pitching, and his later career was marked by inconsistent performances.[3]

Born in Prospect Park, New Jersey, he moved with his family to Midland Park, New Jersey in 1918.[4]

Johnny Vander Meer
Johnny Vander Meer
Johnny Vander Meer in 1948
Pitcher
Born: November 2, 1914
Prospect Park, New Jersey
Died: October 6, 1997 (aged 82)
Tampa, Florida
Batted: Switch Threw: Left
MLB debut
April 22, 1937, for the Cincinnati Reds
Last MLB appearance
May 7, 1951, for the Cleveland Indians
MLB statistics
Win–loss record119–121
Earned run average3.44
Strikeouts1,294
Teams
Career highlights and awards

Baseball career

Vander Meer threw left-handed and batted as a switch hitter.[1] He had an inauspicious start to his professional baseball career. He was signed by the Brooklyn Dodgers as an amateur free agent in 1933 and assigned to the Dayton Ducks.[5] Dayton then sold his contract to a Boston Bees minor league affiliate, the Scranton Miners of the New York–Pennsylvania League.[5] The Miners found his playing ability to be lacking and sent him to the Cincinnati Reds affiliate, the Nashville Volunteers, in a trade for Tiny Chaplin.[5] From Nashville, he was sent to the Durham Bulls, where the Bulls manager and catcher, Johnny Gooch, was credited with helping control the wildness of Vander Meer's pitching.[5] In 1936, he posted a record of 19 wins against six losses for Durham.[6]

Johnny Vander Meer Reds
Vander Meer in 1940

Vander Meer made his major league debut with the Cincinnati Reds on April 22, 1937 at the age of 22.[1] He won 3 games and lost 4 before being sent back to the minor leagues with the Syracuse Chiefs for most of the season when the Reds recalled him in September.[6] The following year on June 11, 1938, Vander Meer pitched a no hitter against the Boston Bees.[7] Four days later against the Brooklyn Dodgers in what was the first night game ever held at Ebbets Field, he threw another no hitter, becoming the only player in major league history to throw two consecutive no-hitters, a historic record that has never been tied and almost certainly will never be beaten.[8][9]

Vander Meer's performance earned him the role as the starting pitcher for the National League team in the 1938 All-Star game held at Cincinnati's Crosley Field.[10] The American League team – having won four of the previous five All-Star games – was favored to win the game, but Vander Meer pitched three scoreless innings and allowed only one hit, as the National League went on to win by a score of 4-1.[10][11] He ended the season with a record of 15 wins against 10 losses and a 3.12 earned run average for the fourth place Reds. He might have won more games, but spent nearly a month in the hospital being treated for boils late in the season.[12]

After his impressive rookie season, Vander Meer had a disappointing 1939 season, when he fell ill during spring training, and then suffered an injury when he slipped on a wet pitching mound in Pittsburgh.[12][13] He posted a record of only five wins with nine losses and an earned run average of 4.67. Early in the 1940 season, he began to experience problems controlling the accuracy of his pitches. In June, the Reds released him back to the minor leagues where he played for the Indianapolis Indians and produced 6 wins against 4 losses.[6][14] He returned to the major leagues in September and posted a 3-1 record, including a 12 inning victory against Philadelphia on September 18, that clinched the National League pennant for the Reds.[12][15] In the 13th inning, Vander Meer hit a double, advanced to third base on a sacrifice fly, then scored the winning run on a squeeze bunt.[16] In the 1940 World Series against the Detroit Tigers, Vander Meer made only one appearance when he entered Game 5 in the fifth inning with the Reds trailing by a score of 7-0. He pitched three scoreless innings as the Reds lost the game by a score of 8-0.[17] The Reds went on to win the series in seven games.[18] It would be the only post-season appearance of Vander Meer's career.[19]

In 1941, Vander Meer's performance improved somewhat with a 16-12 record and six shutouts while leading the league with 202 strikeouts. On June 6, 1941 in a game against Philadelphia, he allowed only one hit.[20] Vander Meer later recalled that the only hit in the game could have been ruled an error, as shortstop Eddie Joost fielded the ground ball, then dropped it before throwing to first base.[21] He earned his third All-Star selection in the 1942 All-Star game, and once again threw three scoreless innings in a 3-1 loss to the American League.[22] He finished the 1942 season with a career-high 18 wins against 12 losses and once again led the league in strikeouts. He posted a 15-16 record in 1943 for the second place Reds and led the league in strikeouts for a third consecutive year. On March 3, 1944, Vander Meer joined the United States Navy and was stationed at Sampson Naval Training Station in New York where he would play for the Navy baseball team.[23] He was discharged from the Navy in December 1945, having lost two years of his major league career to his military service,[24] but Vander Meer claimed that his extensive military play made him less wild as a pitcher, which his record partially supports.[25]

The thirty-one-year-old pitcher returned to play for the Reds in 1946 although he was not able to recapture his previous form. He produced one more notable season in 1948 when he won 17 games with 14 losses, before his contract was sold to the Chicago Cubs in February 1950.[26] After an ineffective year with the Cubs, he was released in March 1951 and was signed as a free agent by the Cleveland Indians.[1] He appeared in only one game for the Indians on May 7, 1951 before being released on June 30, 1951 at the age of 36.[1] Vander Meer was an incidental witness when his Cincinnati team-mate Ewell Blackwell almost duplicated his consecutive no-hit feat in 1947, by pitching a no-hitter against the Braves, then in his next appearance held the Dodgers without a hit until the ninth inning when he gave up two hits.[21]

Vander Meer returned to the minor leagues where he played for five more seasons until the age of 40.[6] In 1952, fourteen years after his consecutive no-hitters, Vander Meer pitched a no-hitter for the Tulsa Oilers against the Beaumont Roughnecks in the Texas League.[27]

Career statistics

A four-time All-Star, Vander Meer compiled a 119–121 record with 1,294 strikeouts and a 3.44 ERA in 2,104⅔ innings over a thirteen-year Major League career.[1] He had 29 career shutouts, ranking third on the Reds franchise list. His 1,251 strikeouts with the Reds were the team record at the time of his retirement in 1951.[1] Along with Tim Lincecum (2008–10), Randy Johnson (1999–2002), and Warren Spahn (1949–52), Vander Meer is one of only four NL pitchers since 1940 to lead the league in strikeouts in three straight seasons (1941–43).[28] Just those four and Dizzy Dean (1932–35) have done it since 1931.[28]

Later life

After retiring as a player at the age of 40, Vander Meer became a minor league manager in the Cincinnati Reds organization for ten seasons before retiring in 1962.[29] After his retirement from baseball, he worked for a brewing company.[12] He was inducted as part of the inaugural class into the Cincinnati Reds Hall of Fame in 1958.[3] He died of an abdominal aneurysm at his home in Tampa, Florida, on October 6, 1997 at the age of 82.[30]

References

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h "Johnny Vander Meer statistics". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved June 7, 2012.
  2. ^ "This Day In Sports: Johnny Vander Meer Makes Debut(s) That Would Impress Stephen Strasburg". espn.go.com. Retrieved June 7, 2012.
  3. ^ a b "Johnny Vander Meer at the Cincinnati Reds Hall of Fame". cincinnati.reds.mlb.com. Retrieved June 7, 2012.
  4. ^ Coutros, Evonne. "Midland Park marking 75th anniversary of Johnny Vander Meer's double no-hitters", The Record (Bergen County), April 8, 2013. Accessed January 27, 2015. "Born Nov. 2, 1914, Vander Meer was an athlete from the time he was in elementary school. His father, Jacob — who worked at Paterson's United Piece and Dye Works — and mother, Katie, lived in Prospect Park until 1918, when they moved to their first home in Midland Park on Rea Avenue."
  5. ^ a b c d "Vander Meer Pitches Second No Run, No Hit Game In Row". The Bulletin. United Press International. June 16, 1938. p. 7. Retrieved June 7, 2012.
  6. ^ a b c d "Johnny Vander Meer minor league statistics". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved June 7, 2012.
  7. ^ "June 11, 1938 Braves-Reds box score". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved June 7, 2012.
  8. ^ "June 15, 1938 Reds-Dodgers box score". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved June 7, 2012.
  9. ^ "Consecutive No Hitters by Johnny Vander Meer". Baseball Almanac.com. Retrieved June 7, 2012.
  10. ^ a b "Vander Meer And Gomez Slated To Start All-Star Game Today". The Meriden Record. Associated Press. July 6, 1938. p. 4. Retrieved June 7, 2012.
  11. ^ "1938 All-Star Game". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved June 8, 2012.
  12. ^ a b c d Langford, Walter M. (June 1985). Johnny Vander Meer Recalls His Consecutive No-Hitters. Baseball Digest. Retrieved June 9, 2012.
  13. ^ "Johnny Vander Meer Is Working Hard To Perfect Control". The Daily Times. United Press International. March 16, 1940. p. 4. Retrieved June 7, 2012.
  14. ^ "Reds Release Vander Meer". The Pittsburgh Press. United Press International. June 29, 1940. p. 7. Retrieved June 8, 2012.
  15. ^ "1940 Johnny Vander Meer Pitching Log". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved June 8, 2012.
  16. ^ "September 18, 1940 Reds-Phillies box score". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved June 9, 2012.
  17. ^ "1940 World Series Game 5 box score". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved June 8, 2012.
  18. ^ "1940 World Series". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved June 8, 2012.
  19. ^ "Johnny Vander Meer post-season statistics". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved June 8, 2012.
  20. ^ "Vander Meer Wins One-Hitter". Eugene Register Guard. Associated Press. June 8, 1941. p. 6. Retrieved June 8, 2012.
  21. ^ a b Levitt, Ed (October 1971). Johnny Vander Meer Recalls His Double No-Hitters. Baseball Digest. Retrieved June 9, 2012.
  22. ^ "1942 All-Star Game". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved June 8, 2012.
  23. ^ "Baseball in Wartime – Johnny Vander Meer". BaseballinWartime.com. Retrieved February 3, 2019.
  24. ^ "Navy Is to discharge Johnny Vander Meer". The Milwaukee Journal. Associated Press. December 19, 1945. p. 2. Retrieved June 8, 2012.
  25. ^ Bullock, Steven R. (2004). Playing for Their Nation: Baseball and the American Military during World War II. University of Nebraska Press. pp. 107–108. ISBN 0-8032-1337-9.
  26. ^ "Vander Meer Sold to Cubs By Cincinnati". The Milwaukee Journal. Associated Press. February 11, 1950. p. 20. Retrieved June 8, 2012.
  27. ^ "Vander Meer Again Hurls No-Hitter". The Dispatch. Associated Press. July 16, 1952. p. 6. Retrieved June 7, 2012.
  28. ^ a b "Amazing on-field feats well within reach". espn.go.com. Retrieved June 7, 2012.
  29. ^ "Johnny Vander Meer minor league managerial record". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved June 8, 2012.
  30. ^ "Double No-Hit Johnny Vander Meer is dead at 82". Moscow-Pullman Daily News. Associated Press. October 7, 1997. p. 7. Retrieved June 8, 2012.

External links

Achievements
Preceded by
Bill Dietrich
Johnny Vander Meer
No-hitter pitcher
June 11, 1938
June 15, 1938
Succeeded by
Johnny Vander Meer
Monte Pearson
1934 Brooklyn Dodgers season

Casey Stengel took over as manager for the 1934 Brooklyn Dodgers, but the team still finished in 6th place.

1938 Cincinnati Reds season

The 1938 Cincinnati Reds season was a season in American baseball. The team finished fourth in the National League with a record of 82–68, 6 games behind the Chicago Cubs.

1938 Major League Baseball All-Star Game

The 1938 Major League Baseball All-Star Game was the sixth playing of the mid-summer classic between the all-stars of the American League (AL) and National League (NL), the two leagues comprising Major League Baseball. The game was held on July 6, 1938, at Crosley Field in Cincinnati, Ohio, the home of the Cincinnati Reds of the National League. The game resulted in the National League defeating the American League 4–1.

1938 Major League Baseball season

The 1938 Major League Baseball season.

1939 Cincinnati Reds season

The 1939 Cincinnati Reds season was a season in American baseball. The team finished first in the National League, winning the pennant by 4½ games over the St. Louis Cardinals with a record of 97–57. The team went on to the 1939 World Series, which it lost in four straight games to the New York Yankees.

1940 Cincinnati Reds season

The 1940 Cincinnati Reds season was a season in American baseball that represented the Cincinnati Reds. Cincinnati entered the season as the reigning National League champions, having been swept by the New York Yankees in the World Series. Cincinnati won 100 games for the first time in franchise history. The team went 100-53 during the season, best in MLB. The team finished first in the National League with a record of 100–53, winning the pennant by 12 games over the Brooklyn Dodgers. They went on to face the Detroit Tigers in the 1940 World Series, beating them in seven games. This was their first championship since 1919.

1971 Baseball Hall of Fame balloting

Elections to the Baseball Hall of Fame for 1971 featured a new committee on the Negro Leagues that met in February and selected Satchel Paige. The museum planned to honor Paige and those who would follow in a special permanent exhibit outside the Hall of Fame but controversy about the nature of the honor began at the event announcing his election, February 9, and continued until the induction ceremonies six months later. At the latter event Paige was inducted to the Hall of Fame itself, the same as the major league figures.

Otherwise the elections continued a system of annual elections in place since 1968.

The Baseball Writers' Association of America (BBWAA) voted by mail to select from recent major league players and elected no one.

The Veterans Committee met in closed-door sessions to select from executives, managers, umpires, and earlier major league players.

It elected seven, the biggest year in its 1953 to 2001 history: Dave Bancroft, Jake Beckley, Chick Hafey, Harry Hooper, Joe Kelley, Rube Marquard, and George Weiss.

Chris Haughey

Christopher Francis Haughey, nicknamed "Bud" (born October 3, 1925), is a former Major League Baseball pitcher who appeared in one game for the Brooklyn Dodgers in 1943. At 18 years of age, the 6 ft 1 in (1.85 m), 180 lb (82 kg) rookie was the second-youngest player to appear in a National League game that season. He was born in Astoria, New York

Haughey is one of many ballplayers who only appeared in the major leagues during World War II. His major league debut happened to be on his 18th birthday, and it was the last game of the season. He pitched seven innings of relief against the Cincinnati Reds at Crosley Field, giving up five hits, ten walks, and six runs (three earned) in a 6–1 loss. Johnny Vander Meer was the winning pitcher. His career ended with a 0–1 record and a 3.86 ERA. Five other players made their Major League debut on the same day, October 3, 1943, as Haughey: Norm Brown, Hank Camelli, Cookie Cuccurullo, Gil Hodges, and Tony Ordenana.

Cincinnati Reds award winners and league leaders

This article is a list of baseball players who are Cincinnati Reds players that are winners of Major League Baseball awards and recognitions, Reds awards and recognitions, and/or are league leaders in various statistical areas.

Don Carlsen

Donald Herbert Carlsen (October 15, 1926 – September 22, 2002) was a right-handed pitcher in Major League Baseball for the Chicago Cubs and Pittsburgh Pirates.

Born in Chicago, Illinois, Carlsen was signed by the Cubs as an amateur free agent in 1944 at age 17. After one season as a fielder, he spent two years in military service. Afterward, he pitched at Pepperdine University and the University of Denver and worked his way through the minor leagues until he got promoted to the Cubs in 1948. He made his one and only appearance for Chicago on April 28, allowing 4 earned runs in just one inning of relief work as the Cubs lost 8–1 to Johnny Vander Meer and the Cincinnati Reds. From 1948 through 1950, Carlsen languished in the Cubs' minor league system. On December 21, 1950, he was purchased from the Cubs by the Hollywood entry in the Pacific Coast League. He was promoted to the Pittsburgh Pirates prior to the start of the 1951 season but split the year between the Pirates and the minors.

With the Pirates in 1951, Carlsen appeared in seven games, starting six. He earned his first major league win on August 19 against his former club, the Cubs, and won his second six days later against the Philadelphia Phillies. Those would end up being the only two wins of Carlsen's career, but he finished the season with respectable numbers of two wins, three losses, two complete games, and a 4.19 ERA.

The right-hander made his final five major league appearances in 1952 with the Pirates, starting one game. In ten total innings, he allowed 12 earned runs on 20 hits and five walks, making his final appearance on May 24 before returning to the minors. He remained there until 1954, finishing his career with the Williamsport Grays in the Pirates' minor league system at age 27.

For his career, Carlsen appeared in 13 games (7 starts), winning two and losing four with a 6.00 ERA.

Carlsen died in Denver, Colorado, on September 22, 2002, aged 75.

Garland Lawing

Garland Frederick Lawing (August 29, 1918 – September 27, 1996) was an American professional baseball player. He appeared in Major League Baseball as an outfielder and pinch hitter in ten games during the 1946 season for the Cincinnati Reds and New York Giants. Lawing threw and batted right-handed; he stood 6 feet 1 inch (1.85 m) tall and weighed 180 pounds (82 kg).

Born in Gastonia, North Carolina, Lawing broke into pro baseball in 1938 in the Class D North Carolina State League. He had reached the Class A1 (now Double-A) level in 1943 when, after only 24 games played, he entered the United States Army. Lawing served in the European Theater of Operations during World War II and missed the 1944 and 1945 baseball seasons.

He split 1946 between the Reds and the Giants, going hitless in three at bats with Cincinnati as a centerfielder and pinch hitter in two games played on May 29 and June 6. Then, on June 8, his contract was sold to the Giants, and he collected his first MLB hit, a pinch single, off Johnny Vander Meer and his old teammates from the Reds on June 11. But he played in only eight total games for New York, four as a starting outfielder, and batted only .167 as a Giant. For his MLB career, he hit .133 in 15 at-bats.

Lawing then returned to minor league baseball in 1947, and retired after the 1954 season. He died in Murrells Inlet, South Carolina, at the age of 78.

List of Cincinnati Reds no-hitters

The Cincinnati Reds are a Major League Baseball franchise based in Cincinnati. They play in the National League Central division. Also known in their early years as the "Cincinnati Red Stockings" (1882–89) and "Cincinnati Redlegs" (1954–59) pitchers for the Reds have thrown 16 no-hitters in franchise history. A no-hitter is officially recognized by Major League Baseball only "when a pitcher (or pitchers) allows no hits during the entire course of a game, which consists of at least nine innings", though one or more batters "may reach base via a walk, an error, a hit by pitch, a passed ball or wild pitch on strike three, or catcher's interference". No-hitters of less than nine complete innings were previously recognized by the league as official; however, several rule alterations in 1991 changed the rule to its current form. A no-hitter is relatively rare, but only one team in Major League Baseball has never had a pitcher accomplish the feat. On September 16, 1988, Tom Browning threw the only perfect game, a special subcategory of no-hitter, in Reds history. As defined by Major League Baseball, "in a perfect game, no batter reaches any base during the course of the game."While Dick Burns of the Outlaw Reds hurled the first no-hitter in Cincinnati baseball history, Bumpus Jones threw the first no-hitter in Reds history on October 15, 1892. The most recent no-hitter was thrown by Homer Bailey on July 2, 2013. Six left-handed starting pitchers have thrown no-hitters in franchise history and the other seven pitchers were right-handed. Eleven Reds no-hitters were thrown at home and only five on the road. They threw two in April, three in May, four in June, three in July, one in August, two in September, and one in October. The longest interval between no-hitters in franchise history was between the games pitched by Browning and Bailey, encompassing over 24 years. Conversely, the shortest interval between no-hitters was between the two consecutive games pitched by Johnny Vander Meer, encompassing merely 4 days from June 11, 1938 till June 15, 1938. The team against whom the Reds have thrown the most no-hit games (three) is the Atlanta Braves (formerly "Boston Braves"), who were defeated by Vander Meer (first no-hitter in 1938), Clyde Shoun (in 1944), and Ewell Blackwell (in 1947). There are two no-hitters which the team allowed at least a run. The most baserunners allowed in a no-hitter was by Jim Maloney (in 1965), who allowed 11. Of the 16 no-hitters, five have been won by a score of 1–0, more common than any other results. The largest margin of victory in a Reds no-hitter was an 11–0 win by Ted Breitenstein in 1898. The smallest margin of victory was 1–0 in wins by Fred Toney in 1917, Shoun in 1944, Maloney in 1965, Browning in 1988, and Bailey in 2012.

The umpire is also an integral part of any no-hitter. The task of the umpire in a baseball game is to make any decision "which involves judgment, such as, but not limited to, whether a batted Ball is fair or foul, whether a pitch is a strike or a Ball, or whether a runner is safe or out… [the umpire's judgment on such matters] is final." Part of the duties of the umpire making calls at home plate includes defining the strike zone, which "is defined as that area over homeplate [sic] the upper limit of which is a horizontal line at the midpoint between the top of the shoulders and the top of the uniform pants, and the lower level is a line at the hollow beneath the kneecap." These calls define every baseball game and are therefore integral to the completion of any no-hitter. 14 different umpires presided over each of the Reds' 16 no-hitters.

The manager is another integral part of any no-hitter. The tasks of the manager is to determine the starting rotation as well as batting order and defensive lineup every game. Managers choosing the right pitcher and right defensive lineup at a right game at a right place at a right time would lead to a no-hitter. 12 different managers have led to the Reds' 16 no-hitters.

List of New York Yankees no-hitters

The New York Yankees are a Major League Baseball franchise based in the New York City borough of The Bronx. Also known in their early years as the "Baltimore Orioles" (1901–02) and the "New York Highlanders" (1903–12), the Yankees have had ten pitchers throw eleven no-hitters in franchise history. A no-hitter is officially recognized by Major League Baseball only "...when a pitcher (or pitchers) allows no hits during the entire course of a game, which consists of at least nine innings. In a no-hit game, a batter may reach base via a walk, an error, a hit by pitch, a passed ball or wild pitch on strike three, or catcher's interference". No-hitters of less than nine complete innings were previously recognized by the league as official; however, several rule alterations in 1991 changed the rule to its current form. A no-hitter is rare enough that the San Diego Padres have never had a pitcher accomplish the feat. Three perfect games, a special subcategory of no-hitter, have been pitched in Yankees history. As defined by Major League Baseball, "in a perfect game, no batter reaches any base during the course of the game." This feat was achieved by Don Larsen in 1956, David Wells in 1998, and David Cone in 1999. Wells later claimed he was a "little hung-over" while throwing his perfect game.Ironically, given the Yankees' celebrated history, none of the eleven pitchers who tossed no-hitters for the franchise is in the Baseball Hall of Fame.

George Mogridge threw the first no-hitter in Yankees history, beating their rival Boston Red Sox 2–1, their only no-hitter in which the opposition scored. Their most recent no-hitter was David Cone's perfect game in 1999, the seventh Yankees no-hitter thrown by a right-handed pitcher and their third perfect game. The Yankees' first perfect game was also thrown by a right-handed pitcher, Don Larsen, and came in Game 5 of the 1956 World Series. Larsen's perfect game was the only no-hitter in MLB postseason play until Roy Halladay of the Philadelphia Phillies pitched a no-hitter in Game 1 of the 2010 National League Division Series. Coincidentally, Cone's perfect game came on "Yogi Berra Day" at Yankee Stadium. Berra had caught Larsen's perfect game and both he and Larsen were in the stands for the game. Of the eleven no-hitters pitched by Yankees players, three each have been won by the scores 4–0 and 2–0, more common than any other result. The largest margin of victory in a Yankees no-hitter was 13 runs, in a 13–0 win by Monte Pearson.

Andy Hawkins lost a game on July 1, 1990 to the Chicago White Sox while on the road by the score of 4–0 without allowing a hit. Because the White Sox were winning entering the ninth inning at home, they did not bat, and thus Hawkins pitched only 8 innings, but the game was considered a no-hitter at the time. However, following rules changes in 1991, the game is no longer counted as a no-hitter. Additionally, Tom L. Hughes held the Cleveland Indians without a hit through the first nine innings of a game on August 6, 1910 but the game went into extra innings and he lost the no-hitter in the tenth inning and ultimately lost the game 5–0.The longest interval between Yankees no-hitters was between the game pitched by Larsen on October 8, 1956 and Dave Righetti's no hitter on July 4, 1983, encompassing 26 years, 8 months, and 26 days. The shortest gap between such games fell between Allie Reynolds' two no-hitters in 1951, a gap of just 2 months and 16 days from July 12 till September 28. Reynolds is the only Yankees pitcher to throw multiple no-hitters in his career, and one of only six pitchers in Major League history to throw multiple no-hitters in a season along with Max Scherzer in 2015, Roy Halladay in 2010, Nolan Ryan in 1973, Virgil Trucks in 1952, and Johnny Vander Meer in 1938. The Red Sox and the Cleveland Indians have been no-hit by the Yankees more than any other franchise, each doing so three times. Notably, Reynolds' two no-hit victims in 1951 were the Red Sox and the Indians.

The umpire is also an integral part of any no-hitter. The task of the umpire in a baseball game is to make any decision "which involves judgment, such as, but not limited to, whether a batted ball is fair or foul, whether a pitch is a strike or a ball, or whether a runner is safe or out... [the umpire's judgment on such matters] is final." Part of the duties of the umpire making calls at home plate includes defining the strike zone, which "is defined as that area over homeplate (sic) the upper limit of which is a horizontal line at the midpoint between the top of the shoulders and the top of the uniform pants, and the lower level is a line at the hollow beneath the kneecap." These calls define every baseball game and are therefore integral to the completion of any no-hitter. No umpire has called multiple Yankee no-hitters. Bill Dinneen, the umpire who called Sad Sam Jones' 1923 no-hitter, is the only person in MLB history to both pitch (for the Red Sox in 1905) and umpire (five total, including Jones') a no-hitter. The plate umpire for Larsen's perfect game, Babe Pinelli, apocryphally "retired" after that game, but that is mere legend; in reality, since Larsen's perfecto was only Game 5 of the seven-game Series, Pinelli didn't officially retire until two days later, concluding his distinguished umpiring career at second base during Game 7, not at home plate during Game 5.

Max Butcher

Albert Maxwell Butcher (September 21, 1910 – September 15, 1957) was an American major league baseball pitcher for the Brooklyn Dodgers, Philadelphia Phillies and Pittsburgh Pirates from 1936–45.Butcher was the opposing pitcher on June 15, 1938 when left-hander Johnny Vander Meer of the visiting Cincinnati Reds threw a second consecutive no-hitter, a feat never duplicated in Major League Baseball since. Butcher was the starting pitcher for Brooklyn in front of an uncommonly large crowd of 38,748, it also being the first night game played at Ebbets Field.

Butcher bounced back from a 17-loss 1939 season in 1941 with a 17–12 record for the Pirates that included 19 complete games. In 1944, he went 13–11 for Pittsburgh and ranked among the league leaders in shutouts with five.

Butcher died five days before his 47th birthday in Logan, West Virginia, reportedly of a liver disease.

Meer

Meer may refer to:

Fatima Meer (1928–2010), South African writer and anti-apartheid activist

Johnny Vander Meer (1914–1997), American baseball pitcher, famed for pitching two consecutive no-hitters

Moosa Ismail Meer, South African journalist and newspaper editor of The Indian Views

Simon van der Meer (1925–2011), Dutch accelerator physicist

Mir Taqi Mir (1722–1810), Urdu poet

Mir (band), Canadian rock band, pronounced "meer"

Meer Campbell, fictional character from the anime series Mobile Suit Gundam SEED

Meer, character in the Deverry Cycle book series

Sporting News Player of the Year Award

This is a list of the Major League Baseball players awarded by Sporting News (formerly TSN, now SN) since 1936 as recipients of the Sporting News Player of the Year Award.

Tot Pressnell

Forest Charles Pressnell (August 8, 1906 – January 6, 2001), was a professional baseball player in the Major Leagues from 1938 to 1942. He pitched for the Brooklyn Dodgers and Chicago Cubs.

Pressnell had to wait until age 31 to make his Major League debut, but it was an impressive one. In the third game of the 1938 season for Brooklyn, he pitched a complete-game shutout against the Philadelphia Phillies, scattering nine hits as the Dodgers won 9–0 in a snappy 1 hour, 53 minutes.On June 15 of that year, Pressnell participated in a history-making game. He pitched in relief on that date for Brooklyn in the first night game of Ebbets Field's history, while Johnny Vander Meer of the visiting Cincinnati Reds that night pitched his second consecutive no-hitter, a feat that has not been duplicated in Major League Baseball.

Pressnell went on to a record of 11–14, the most victories he would have in a single season.

In his nine previous minor-league seasons, Pressnell won 111 games, including one season split between the Wichita Falls Spudders and Longview Cannibals.

Pressnell married Ruth Herge (died 1956) in 1931 and Helen Freese Cramer (died 1997) in 1959. After retirement he worked for Ohio Oil, the precessor to Marathon Oil. He died in the city of his birth, Findlay, Ohio, on January 6, 2001, aged 94.

Van der Meer

Van der Meer is a Dutch toponymic surname meaning "from the lake". A common contracted form is Vermeer. Abroad the name has often been concatenated to Vander Meer or Vandermeer, and VanderMeer. It may refer to:

Van der MeerBarend van der Meer (1659–1700), Dutch painter

Douwe Mout van der Meer (1705–1758), Dutch VOC sailor and owner of a rhinoceros

Erik van der Meer (born 1967), Dutch football player and coach

Frits van der Meer (1904–1994), Dutch archeologist and theologist

Gerrit van der Meer (born 1950), Dutch television and film producer

Harry van der Meer (born 1973), Dutch water polo player

Johan van der Meer (conductor) (1913–2011), Dutch choral conductor

Johannes van der Meer, alternative name of Jan Vermeer (1632–1675), Dutch painter

John Henry van der Meer (1920–2008), Dutch organologist and museum curator

Jolande van der Meer (born 1964), Dutch swimmer

Jos van der Meer (born 1947), Dutch medical scientist

Karel van der Meer (1905–1978), Dutch football referee

L. Bouke van der Meer (born 1945), Dutch archaeologist

Maartje van der Meer-Offers (1891–1944), Dutch contralto singer

Marleen de Pater-van der Meer (1950–2015), Dutch politician

Maud van der Meer (born 1992), Dutch swimmer

Moritz Hohenbaum van der Meer (1718–1795), Swiss historian

Nicolaes Woutersz van der Meer (1575–1666), Dutch politician

Patrick van der Meer (born 1971), Dutch dressage rider

Rick van der Meer (born 1997), Dutch footballer

Rob van der Meer (born ca. 1956), Dutch Surgeon General

Robin van der Meer (born 1995), Dutch footballer

Robine van der Meer (born 1971), Dutch actress

Simon van der Meer (1925–2011), Dutch physicist

Stientje van Veldhoven-van der Meer (born 1973), Dutch politician

Stijn van der Meer (born 1993), Dutch baseball player

Susie van der Meer (born 1973), German singer-songwriter

Vonne van der Meer (born 1952), Dutch novelist and playwrightVanderMeer, Vandermeer, Vander MeerAnn VanderMeer, American publisher and editor, wife of Jeff VanderMeer

Annie VanderMeer), American video game designer

Jeff VanderMeer (born 1968), American writer, husband of Ann VanderMeer

Jim Vandermeer (born 1980), Canadian ice hockey player

John Vandermeer (born 1940), American ecologist

Johnny Vander Meer (1914–1997), American baseball player

Nancy VanderMeer (born 1958), American politician

Pete Vandermeer (born 1975), Canadian ice hockey player

Tony Vandermeer (born 1962), American politician

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