Johnny Schulte

John Clement Schulte (September 8, 1896 – June 28, 1978) was an American catcher and longtime coach in professional baseball. A native of Fredericktown, Missouri, Schulte batted left-handed, threw right-handed and was listed as 5 feet 11 inches (1.80 m) tall and 190 pounds (86 kg).

Schulte's professional playing career began in 1915. It lasted for 15 seasons and was interrupted by two years (1917–18) in military service during World War I. He played for five Major League Baseball teams over all or parts of five seasons: the St. Louis Browns (1923 and 1932), St. Louis Cardinals (1927), Philadelphia Phillies (1928), Chicago Cubs (1929) and Boston Braves (1932). Altogether, he appeared in 192 games, hitting .264 with 98 hits, including 15 doubles, four triples and 14 home runs. His best year, as a second-string catcher for the 1927 Cardinals, saw him set personal bests in most offensive categories. In Chicago, he was a reserve catcher on the 1929 National League champions and played under Joe McCarthy, whom he would later serve as a longtime coach.

After his maiden coaching assignment with the Cubs in 1933,[1] Schulte joined McCarthy and the New York Yankees beginning in 1934. He coached 15 full seasons (1934–48) in the Bronx,[2] even serving under Bill Dickey, Johnny Neun and Bucky Harris after McCarthy's retirement in May 1946. The Yankees won seven World Series titles and eight American League pennants during Schulte's decade and a half as a coach.

Then, in 1949, he rejoined McCarthy with the Boston Red Sox.[3] When McCarthy retired for the final time on June 23, 1950, Schulte was reassigned to scouting duties by the Red Sox. He coached in minor league baseball for the Yankees' Kansas City Blues Triple-A affiliate before returning to scouting with the Cleveland Indians.

Johnny Schulte died in St. Louis, Missouri, at the age of 81.

Johnny Schulte
JohnnySchulteGoudeycard
Catcher/Coach
Born: September 8, 1896
Fredericktown, Missouri
Died: June 28, 1978 (aged 81)
St. Louis, Missouri
Batted: Left Threw: Right
MLB debut
April 18, 1923, for the St. Louis Browns
Last MLB appearance
September 20, 1932, for the Boston Braves
MLB statistics
Batting average.262
Home runs14
Runs batted in64
On-base percentage.388
Slugging percentage.436
Teams
As player

As coach

Career highlights and awards

Notes

  1. ^ "Chicago Cubs : History : Cubs All-Time Coaches". Retrieved 2006-12-24.
  2. ^ "New York Yankees : History : Yankees All-Time Coaches". Retrieved 2006-12-24.
  3. ^ "Boston Red Sox : History : Red Sox All-Time Coaches". Retrieved 2006-12-24.

External links

Sporting positions
Preceded by
N/A
Boston Red Sox Bullpen Coach
1949
Succeeded by
George Susce
1923 St. Louis Browns season

The 1923 St. Louis Browns season involved the Browns finishing 5th in the American League with a record of 74 wins and 78 losses.

1927 St. Louis Cardinals season

The 1927 St. Louis Cardinals season was the team's 46th season in St. Louis, Missouri, and its 36th season in the National League. The Cardinals went 92–61 during the season and finished second in the National League.

1928 Philadelphia Phillies season

The 1928 Philadelphia Phillies season was a season in Major League Baseball. The Phillies finished eighth in the National League with a record of 43 wins and 109 losses.

1929 Chicago Cubs season

The 1929 Chicago Cubs season was the 58th season of the Chicago Cubs franchise, the 54th in the National League and the 14th at Wrigley Field. The Cubs finished first in the National League with a record of 98–54, 10.5 games ahead of the second place Pittsburgh Pirates. The team was defeated four games to one by the Philadelphia Athletics in the 1929 World Series.

1932 Boston Braves season

The 1932 Boston Braves season was the 62nd season of the franchise.

1932 St. Louis Browns season

The 1932 St. Louis Browns season involved the Browns finishing 6th in the American League with a record of 63 wins and 91 losses.

1933 Chicago Cubs season

The 1933 Chicago Cubs season was the 62nd season of the Chicago Cubs franchise, the 58th in the National League and the 18th at Wrigley Field. The Cubs finished third in the National League with a record of 86–68.

1934 New York Yankees season

The 1934 New York Yankees season was the team's 32nd season in New York and its 34th season overall. The team finished with a record of 94–60, finishing 7 games behind the Detroit Tigers. New York was managed by Joe McCarthy. The Yankees played their home games at Yankee Stadium. It would also be the final year Babe Ruth would play as a Yankee.

1937 New York Yankees season

The 1937 New York Yankees season was their 35th season. The team finished with a record of 102–52, winning their 9th pennant, finishing 13 games ahead of the Detroit Tigers. New York was managed by Joe McCarthy. The Yankees played at Yankee Stadium. In the World Series, they beat the New York Giants in 5 games. This gave the Yankees a 3-to-2 edge in overall series play against the Giants.

1937 saw significant changes in the layout of Yankee Stadium, as concrete bleachers were built to replace the aging wooden structure, reducing the cavernous "death valley" of left center and center considerably, although the area remained a daunting target for right-handed power hitters such as Joe DiMaggio.

1938 New York Yankees season

The 1938 New York Yankees season was their 36th season. The team finished with a record of 99–53, winning their 10th pennant, finishing 9.5 games ahead of the Boston Red Sox. New York was managed by Joe McCarthy. The Yankees played their home games at Yankee Stadium. In the 1938 World Series, they beat the Chicago Cubs in 4 games. This marked the first time any team had won three consecutive World Series.

1940 New York Yankees season

The 1940 New York Yankees season was the team's 38th season in New York and its 40th overall. The team finished in third place with a record of 88–66, finishing two games behind the American League champion Detroit Tigers and one game behind the second-place Cleveland Indians. New York was managed by Joe McCarthy. Their home games were played at the Yankee Stadium.

1941 New York Yankees season

The 1941 New York Yankees season was the 39th season for the team in New York, and its 41st season overall. The team finished with a record of 101–53, winning their 12th pennant, finishing 17 games ahead of the Boston Red Sox. New York was managed by Joe McCarthy. The Yankees played their home games at Yankee Stadium. In the World Series, they beat the Brooklyn Dodgers in 5 games.

Books and songs have been written about the 1941 season, the last before the United States became drawn into World War II. Yankees' center fielder Joe DiMaggio captured the nation's fancy with his lengthy hitting streak that extended through 56 games before finally being stopped. A big-band style song called Joltin' Joe DiMaggio was a hit for the Les Brown orchestra.

1943 New York Yankees season

The 1943 New York Yankees season was the team's 41st season in New York, and its 43rd season overall. The team finished with a record of 98–56, winning their 14th pennant, finishing 13.5 games ahead of the Washington Senators. Managed by Joe McCarthy, the Yankees played at Yankee Stadium. In the World Series, they defeated the St. Louis Cardinals in 5 games.

1944 New York Yankees season

The 1944 New York Yankees season was the team's 42nd season in New York, and its 44th season overall. The team finished in third place in the American League with a record of 83–71, finishing 6 games behind the St. Louis Browns. New York was managed by Joe McCarthy. The Yankees played their home games at Yankee Stadium.

1945 New York Yankees season

The 1945 New York Yankees season was the team's 43rd season in New York and its 45th overall. The team finished in fourth place in the American League with a record of 81–71, finishing 6.5 games behind the Detroit Tigers. New York was managed by Joe McCarthy. The Yankees played at Yankee Stadium.

1946 New York Yankees season

The 1946 New York Yankees season was the team's 44th season in New York, and its 46th overall. The team finished with a record of 87–67, finishing 17 games behind the Boston Red Sox. New York was managed by Joe McCarthy, Bill Dickey, and Johnny Neun. The Yankees played at Yankee Stadium.

1947 New York Yankees season

The 1947 New York Yankees season was the team's 45th season in New York, and its 47th season overall. The team finished with a record of 97–57, winning their 15th pennant, finishing 12 games ahead of the Detroit Tigers. New York was managed by Bucky Harris. The Yankees played their home games at Yankee Stadium. In the World Series, they defeated the Brooklyn Dodgers in 7 games. It was the first ever season of the Yankees to be broadcast live on television with WABD providing the television broadcast feed to viewers in the city.

Bubber Jonnard

Clarence James "Bubber" Jonnard (November 23, 1897 – August 12, 1977) was a Major League Baseball catcher. He played for the Chicago White Sox in 1920, the Pittsburgh Pirates in 1922, the Philadelphia Phillies in 1926, 1927 and 1935, and the St. Louis Cardinals in 1929. He played 103 Major League games with 235 at bats, 54 hits, no home runs and 20 RBIs. His lifetime batting average was .230, with a .267 on-base percentage and a .268 slugging percentage. As a fielder, he caught 86 games with a fielding percentage of .960. On December 13, 1927, he was part of a trade in which the Phillies received pitcher Jimmy Ring and catcher Johnny Schulte from the Cardinals in exchange for Jonnard, infielder Jimmy Cooney and outfielder Johnny Mokan. He served as a coach for the New York Giants from 1942 to 1946. He also served as a scout for the Giants, Kansas City Athletics, Baltimore Orioles and New York Mets. Players he signed as Mets' scout included Ed Kranepool, Nino Espinosa, Mike Jorgensen, Ken Singleton and Leroy Stanton.He played for several minor league teams, including the San Antonio Bronchos, Norfolk Mary Janes, Nashville Volunteers, Wichita Falls Spudders, Houston Buffaloes, Rochester Red Wings, Jersey City Skeeters, Dallas Steers and Fort Worth Cats. In all, he played 987 minor league games with a batting average of .252 and 18 home runs. He managed the minor league Dallas Steers as a player-manager in 1933 and he managed the Milford Giants in 1940. He also managed the Minneapolis Millerettes of the All-American Girls Professional Baseball League during the 1944 season.Jonnard was born on November 23, 1897 in Nashville, Tennessee. His twin brother Claude Jonnard was a Major League pitcher for the New York Giants, St. Louis Browns and Chicago Cubs between 1921 and 1929. Bubber and Claude were teammates on the Nashville Volunteers in 1920 and 1921, where the twin brothers formed the team's battery. He died at the age of 79 on August 12, 1977 in New York City. He is buried in Dallas, Texas.

List of Boston Red Sox coaches

The following is a list of coaches, including role(s) and year(s) of service, for the Boston Red Sox American League franchise (1901–present), known during its early history as the Boston Americans (1901–1907).

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