Johnny Roland

Johnny Earl Roland (born May 21, 1943) is a former American football player and coach. He played as a running back in the National Football League (NFL) for the St. Louis Cardinals from 1966 to 1972 and the New York Giants in 1973. Roland played college football at the University of Missouri, where he was a consensus All-American in 1965 as a defensive back. After his playing days, he served as an assistant coach with the number of NFL teams and at the University of Notre Dame. Roland was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame as a player in 1998.

Johnny Roland
Johnny Roland
Born:May 21, 1943 (age 75)
Corpus Christi, Texas
Career information
Position(s)Running back
CollegeMissouri
AFL draft1965 / Round: Red Shirt 1 / Pick: 4
Drafted byNew York Jets
NFL draft1965 / Round: 4 / Pick: 54
Career history
As coach
1974Green Bay Packers (assistant)
1975Notre Dame (assistant)
1976–1978Philadelphia Eagles (RB)
1983–1992Chicago Bears (RB)
1993–1994New York Jets (RB)
1995–1996St. Louis Rams (RB)
1997–2003Arizona Cardinals (RB)
2004Green Bay Packers (RB)
2005New Orleans Saints (assistant)
As player
1966–1972St. Louis Cardinals
1973New York Giants
Career highlights and awards
Pro Bowls2
Career stats

Playing career

High school

Roland played high school football at Roy Miller High School in Corpus Christi, Texas and led the team to a 13–1 record and the 4A State Championship.[1]

College

Roland played college football at the University of Missouri. In 1962, he rushed for 830 yards, seventh best total in the nation, and scored 78 points, ninth in the nation. This rushing total included 155 yards against Oklahoma State University and 104 against Iowa State University.[2] One of his most notable games that season was his first varsity game, where he rushed for 171 yards and three touchdowns.[1] That season, Roland earned his first All-Big Eight Conference honor.

Thought to have stolen a pair of tires, Roland was forced to leave the team and the school during the 1963 season and worked that year in Kansas City.[1] He was welcomed back to the team in 1964 and was moved to the defensive back position. He led his team to a 6–3–1 record and was again chosen as an All-Big Eight Conference player. In 1965, Roland led the Tigers to an 8–2–1 record and a victory in the 1966 Sugar Bowl over the Florida Gators, 20–18. That season, he was named the team's captain, was voted a College All-American, and again was on the All-Big Eight team.[2] By being named the captain of the 1965 team, Roland was the first African-American to serve as the captain for any University of Missouri athletic team.[1]

Roland had his jersey retired (#23) by Missouri and was inducted to the College Football Hall of Fame in 2005.[2]

Professional

Roland was drafted in the fourth round of the 1965 NFL Draft by the St. Louis Cardinals and was named UPI NFL-NFC Rookie of the Year in 1966.[3] He played for seven seasons with the Cardinals, and he became the franchise's leading rusher (since broken). He then went on to play for one season with the New York Giants. Roland played in 103 NFL games, during which he rushed for 3,750 yards and 28 touchdowns on 1,015 attempts, caught 153 passes for 1,430 yards and six touchdowns, returned 49 punts for 452 yards with two touchdowns, returned 22 kickoffs for 444 yards, and completed five of 13 passes for 130 yards and one touchdown.

Coaching career

First stint with Green Bay (1974)

Roland's former college coach, Dan Devine, hired Roland to be the Green Bay Packers special assignments coach in 1974. While there, he coordinated some of the first computer programs used by Packers coaches, as well as scouting college talent and coaching.[4]

Notre Dame (1975)

Roland then followed Devine to the University of Notre Dame, where he was an assistant coach in 1975.[4]

Philadelphia Eagles (1976–1978)

Roland was the running backs coach for the Philadelphia Eagles from 1976 to 1978 under head coach Dick Vermeil.[5] During his time there, Roland coached Wilbert Montgomery, who helped lead Philadelphia to Super Bowl XV and remains the Eagles' all-time leading rusher.[6]

Chicago Bears (1983–1992)

Roland was hired by Chicago Bears head coach Mike Ditka in 1983 to help coach running back Walter Payton, who at the time stood 2,108 yards from Jim Brown's NFL rushing record and then broke the mark in 1984. Roland also coached Payton's successor Neal Anderson, whom Roland coached into the Bears' second all-time leading rusher.[7] The Bears during Roland's tenure led the league in rushing four times, and finished among the top three in seven of his 11 seasons. From 1984 to 1988, Chicago rushed for 160.9 yards per game, went 62–17 (.785), made the playoffs five straight years and won Super Bowl XX.[4]

New York Jets (1993–1994)

Roland was the running backs coach for the New York Jets from 1993 to 1994.

St. Louis Rams (1995–1996)

Roland joined the St. Louis Rams in 1995 and coached running back Jerome Bettis during Bettis' last year with the Rams before playing for the Pittsburgh Steelers.[4]

Arizona Cardinals (1997–2003)

Roland joined the Arizona Cardinals in 1997. During his final season with the Cardinals in 2003, he coached Emmitt Smith who was traded by the Dallas Cowboys in the offseason. By coaching Smith, Roland became the only coach to work with the two all-time leading NFL rushers (Payton and Smith).[4]

Second stint with Green Bay (2004)

Roland started his second stint with Green Bay in 2004 as the coach for Ahman Green, who was the National Football Conference's leading rusher in 2003 and second all-time leading rusher in franchise history.[4][8] Roland coached in Green Bay for only one season before being hired by the New Orleans Saints. He left the Packers because he reportedly had differences with head coach Mike Sherman and the Packers had reservations about Roland's work ethic.[9]

New Orleans Saints (2005)

Roland joined the New Orleans Saints in 2005 under head coach Jim Haslett. Haslett was fired the following season and replaced with Sean Payton, who chose not to retain Roland.[10]

Personal life

Roland lives in Tempe, Arizona, and has two sons, Johnny, Jr. and James, and one daughter, Cynnamon.[4] He owned part of a radio station, KIRL, in St. Louis, until it filed for bankruptcy in 2004.[11] He also owns WRBZ in Wetumpka, Alabama.

References

  1. ^ a b c d "Helmut Hut – Missouri". Helmut Hut. Retrieved 2008-12-15.
  2. ^ a b c "Johnny Roland". College Football Hall of Fame. Football Foundation. Retrieved 2008-12-15.
  3. ^ "United Press International NFL-NFC Rookie of the Year". CBS Sports. Archived from the original on 2008-10-25. Retrieved 2008-12-15.
  4. ^ a b c d e f g "Johnny Roland Named Running Backs Coach". Green Bay Packers. Archived from the original on September 7, 2008. Retrieved 2008-12-15.
  5. ^ "Eagles All-Time Coaches". Philadelphia Eagles. Retrieved 2008-12-15.
  6. ^ "Regular Season Records" (PDF). Philadelphia Eagles. Retrieved 2008-12-15.
  7. ^ "Chicago Bears Rushing Career Register". Pro Football Reference. Retrieved 2008-12-15.
  8. ^ "Green Bay Packers Rushing Career Register". Pro Football Reference. Retrieved 2008-12-15.
  9. ^ "Coaches flee Packers". Journal Sentinel. Retrieved 2008-12-15.
  10. ^ "Johnny Roland, AC, Free Agent". KFFL. Archived from the original on December 5, 2014. Retrieved 2008-12-15.
  11. ^ Tritto, Christopher (2004-09-05). "Former Big Red stars put bankrupt KIRL on block". St. Louis Business Journal. Retrieved 2008-12-15.

External links

1962 All-Big Eight Conference football team

The 1962 All-Big Eight Conference football team consists of American football players chosen by various organizations for All-Big Eight Conference teams for the 1962 college football season. The selectors for the 1962 season included the Associated Press (AP) and the United Press International (UPI). Players selected as first-team players by both the AP and UPI are designated in bold.

1962 Missouri Tigers football team

The 1962 Missouri Tigers football team was an American football team that represented the University of Missouri in the Big Eight Conference (Big 8) during the 1962 college football season. The team compiled an 8–1–2 record (5–1–1 against Big 8 opponents), finished in second place in the Big 8, and outscored opponents by a combined total of 204 to 62. Dan Devine was the head coach for the fifth of 13 seasons. The team played its home games at Memorial Stadium in Columbia, Missouri.

The team's statistical leaders included Johnny Roland with 830 rushing yards, 850 yards of total offense, and 78 points, Jim Johnson with 198 passing yards, Bill Tobin with 75 receiving yards, and Bill Tobin with 38 point scored.

1964 All-Big Eight Conference football team

The 1964 All-Big Eight Conference football team consists of American football players chosen by various organizations for All-Big Eight Conference teams for the 1964 college football season. The selectors for the 1964 season included the Associated Press (AP) and the United Press International (UPI). Players selected as first-team players by both the AP and UPI are designated in bold.

1965 All-Big Eight Conference football team

The 1965 All-Big Eight Conference football team consists of American football players chosen by various organizations for All-Big Eight Conference teams for the 1965 college football season. The selectors for the 1965 season included the Associated Press (AP).

1966 Sugar Bowl

The 1966 Sugar Bowl featured the sixth-ranked Missouri Tigers of the Big Eight Conference and the unranked Florida Gators of the Southeastern Conference. The Tigers entered the game with a 7–2–1 record during the 1965 season, while the Gators entered at 7–3.

After a scoreless first quarter, Missouri went on a tear in the second quarter. Charlie Brown scored on a 16-yard touchdown run giving the Tigers a 7–0 lead. Johnny Roland threw an 11-yard touchdown pass to Earl Denny as the Tigers extended their lead to 14–0. Bill Bates kicked a 27-yard field goal as Missouri led 17–0 at halftime.

In the third quarter, Bates kicked a 34-yard field goal as Missouri led 20–0 at the end of three. Florida attempted to make a furious comeback in the fourth quarter. Steve Spurrier threw a 22-yard touchdown pass to halfback Jack Harper as Florida got within 20–6. Spurrier threw another 21-yard touchdown pass to end Charles Casey as Florida got within 20–12. Spurrier scored himself from two yards out, as the score became 20–18. Florida failed on three consecutive two-point conversion attempts, and had they just kicked the extra points, they may have ended with a win.

Despite playing on the losing team, Florida's Steve Spurrier was named Sugar Bowl MVP.

Missouri honored the 1966 Sugar Bowl champion Tigers in the 2015 season, bringing the team to midfield at halftime of their 24-10 win over South Carolina, then coached by Spurrier.

1967 All-Pro Team

The following is a list of players that were named to the Associated Press All-Pro Team in 1967. Players from the first and second teams are listed, with players from the first team in bold, where applicable.

1967 St. Louis Cardinals (NFL) season

The 1967 St. Louis Cardinals season was the team's 48th year with the National Football League (NFL) and the 8th season in St. Louis.

1968 St. Louis Cardinals (NFL) season

The 1968 St. Louis Cardinals season was the 49th season the team was in the National Football League (NFL). The team improved on their previous output of 6–7–1, winning nine games. Despite the improvement, they failed to qualify for the playoffs for the 20th consecutive season.

1969 St. Louis Cardinals (NFL) season

The 1969 St. Louis Cardinals season was the 50th season the team was in the National Football League (NFL).

The team failed to improve on their previous output of 9–4–1, winning only four games. They failed to qualify for the playoffs for the 21st consecutive season.

The Cardinals’ defense allowed 38 passing touchdowns, the second-highest total in pro football history.

1991 Chicago Bears season

The 1991 Chicago Bears season was their 72nd regular season and 21st postseason completed in the National Football League (NFL). The Bears returned to the playoffs for a second consecutive season as one of three NFC Wild Cards, finishing with an 11–5 record and in second place in the NFC Central. They were beaten, however, by the Dallas Cowboys in their first playoff game. This was Mike Ditka's last playoff game as a head coach.

1997 Arizona Cardinals season

The 1997 Arizona Cardinals season was the franchise's 99th season, 78th season in the National Football League and the 10th in Arizona. The team was unable to match their previous output of 7–9, instead winning only four games. The Cardinals failed to qualify to the playoffs for the fifteenth consecutive season.

1999 Arizona Cardinals season

The 1999 Arizona Cardinals season was the franchise's 101st season, 80th season in the National Football League and the 12th in Arizona.. The team was unable to match their previous output of 9–7, instead winning only six games. The Cardinals will fail to return to the playoffs until the 2008 season.

2001 Arizona Cardinals season

The 2001 Arizona Cardinals season was the franchise’s 82nd year with the National Football League and the 14th season in Arizona. It was their final season in the NFC East division before moving to their current division, the NFC West. The 2001 Cardinals were also the final team in NFL history to have a Week 1 bye.

The 2001 season was Pat Tillman’s final season as he left the NFL to join the U.S. Army following the season.

2002 Arizona Cardinals season

The 2002 Arizona Cardinals season was the franchise’s 83rd year with the National Football League and 15th season in Arizona. It was their first season in the NFC West. It was Jake Plummer’s final season with the Cardinals as he went to the Denver Broncos in the 2003 off-season.

2003 Arizona Cardinals season

The 2003 Arizona Cardinals season was the franchise's 105th season, 84th season in the National Football League and the 16th in Arizona. The team was unable to improve upon their previous output of 5–11, instead winning only four games, although this was not considered a disaster as before their win over the Packers there was talk the 2003 Cardinals would become the first NFL team to go 0–16. For the fifth consecutive season, the franchise failed to reach the playoffs, and based on point differential had the worst record in the only NFL season where every team won at least four games. This resulted in the Cardinals firing head coach Dave McGinnis and replacing him with Dennis Green. In his NFL debut, Anquan Boldin had 217 receiving yards.

Die Rote Meile

Die Rote Meile is a German television drama that aired on Sat.1 and follows the lives of strippers, prostitutes and their pimps in the district of St. Pauli in Hamburg. The first season premiered on 1 October 1999 and consisted 26 episodes. The show was a rival to the RTL drama Hinter Gittern - Der Frauenknast; both airing in the same time-slot - Monday nights at 9:15 pm. A second season was ordered by the network in the spring of 2000 and started airing on Thursday nights at 8:15 pm on 14 December 2000. The show was canceled in the beginning of 2001, airing its last episode on 8 March 2001.

John Werket

John "Johnny" Roland Werket (October 8, 1924 – June 4, 2010) was an American speed skater. He competed in seven events in total at the 1948, 1952 and 1956 Winter Olympics with the best achievement of sixth place in the 1500 m in 1948. In 1948, he also won the 1500 m event and a silver allround medal at the world championships. This was the best achievement for an American skater, surpassed only in 1977 by Eric Heiden. In 1950, Werket finished in third place allround, but won the 500 m and 1,500 m events. In 1952, he finished second in the 500 m and 1,500 m and tenth overall.After graduating from Roosevelt High School in Minneapolis, he enlisted as paratrooper with the 101st Airborne Division and fought in World War II. He then graduated from Augsburg College in 1949. Werket was of Norwegian descent. While competing in Hamar, Norway, he met Vesla Bekkevoll, then aged 16, and married her on August 17, 1951 in Minneapolis. He retired from competitions after the 1952 World Championships and coached skating, first at the Richfield Skating Club, and then with US national team, preparing it to the 1972 Winter Olympics. His trainees included Diane Holum and Eric Heiden. In parallel he worked at the Northern States Power Company and eventually advanced to an executive position. He retired in 1983 after 32 years with the Northern States Power and settled in Sun City, Arizona, where he died in 2010 of stroke and cancer complications. He was survived by his wife and two sons, John and Jim.Personal bests:

500 m – 42.0 (1956)

1500 m – 2:16.1 (1956)

5000 m – 8:44.6 (1950)

10000 m – 18:10.2 (1950)

List of University of Missouri Intercollegiate Athletics Hall of Fame Inductees

The list consists of inductees into the University of Missouri Intercollegiate Athletics Hall of Fame.

Missouri Tigers football

The Missouri Tigers football program represents the University of Missouri (often referred to as Mizzou) in college football and competes in the Football Bowl Subdivision (FBS) of the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA). Since 2012, Missouri has been a member of the Southeastern Conference (SEC) and is currently aligned in its Eastern Division. Home games are played at Faurot Field ("The Zou") in Columbia, Missouri.

Missouri's football program dates back to 1890, and has appeared in 33 bowl games (including 10 major bowl appearances: 4 Orange Bowls, 3 Cotton Bowls, 2 Sugar Bowls, and 1 Fiesta Bowl). Missouri has won 15 conference titles, 5 division titles, and has 2 national championship selections recognized by the NCAA. Entering the 2017 season, Missouri's all-time record is 671–556–52 (.545).

The team was coached by Gary Pinkel (2001–2015), who is the winningest coach of all-time at Missouri (setting that mark with his 102nd win at the AT&T Cotton Bowl on January 3, 2014). Pinkel's record with Mizzou after his final game on November 27, 2015, is 118–73 (.618).

Offense
Defense

This page is based on a Wikipedia article written by authors (here).
Text is available under the CC BY-SA 3.0 license; additional terms may apply.
Images, videos and audio are available under their respective licenses.