Johnny Lindell

John Harlan Lindell (August 30, 1916 – August 27, 1985) was an American professional baseball player[1] who was an outfielder and pitcher in Major League Baseball from 1941 to 1950 and from 1953 to 1954[1] for the New York Yankees, St. Louis Cardinals, Philadelphia Phillies and Pittsburgh Pirates. Lindell stood 6 feet 4 inches (1.93 m) tall and weighed 217 pounds (98 kg); he threw and batted right-handed.

Johnny Lindell
Johnny Lindell 1948.jpeg
Outfielder / Pitcher
Born: August 30, 1916
Greeley, Colorado
Died: August 27, 1985 (aged 68)
Newport Beach, California
Batted: Right Threw: Right
MLB debut
April 18, 1941, for the New York Yankees
Last MLB appearance
May 9, 1954, for the Philadelphia Phillies
MLB statistics
Batting average.273
Home runs72
Runs batted in404
Win–loss record8–18
Earned run average4.47
Strikeouts146
Teams
Career highlights and awards

Athletic career

Born in Greeley, Colorado, Lindell attended Monrovia High School in Monrovia, California, where he starred in football and track as well as in baseball.[2] At the 1935 Southern California Prep Championships, he won the 120 yard High Hurdles and placed third in the long jump.[3] Lindell won a scholarship to attend the University of Southern California.[2]

Lindell began his professional baseball career in 1936 at the age of 19 when he was signed by the New York Yankees organization.[1] He progressed through the Yankees' minor league system as a pitcher.[4] While playing for the Kansas City Blues in 1940, he led the American Association with 18 victories.[5] Lindell made his major league debut at the age of 24 with the Yankees on April 18, 1941 before being returned to the minor leagues where, he won 23 games against 4 defeats to help the Newark Bears win the International League championship.[6][7] In December 1941, he was selected as the Minor League Player of the Year.[8]

Lindell returned to the major leagues in 1942 as a relief pitcher but, Yankees manager Joe McCarthy thought that his low strikeout totals indicated that his fast ball had lost its velocity.[9] During spring training in 1943, McCarthy experimented with using Lindell as a first baseman and as an outfielder.[9] He hit well enough to win the starting right fielder's position and, had a batting average above the .300 mark in early June to earn a place as a reserve player for the American League team in the 1943 All-Star Game.[10][11][12] In the second half of the season, his hitting tapered off and he was replaced in the starting lineup by Bud Metheny.[10] Lindell ended the season leading the league with 12 triples along with a .245 batting average in 122 games as the Yankees won the American League pennant by 13½ games over the Washington Senators.[1][13]

Lindell played a pivotal role in Game 3 of the 1943 World Series against the St. Louis Cardinals.[14] With the series tied at one game apiece and the Yankees trailing by a score of 2 to 1, Lindell hit a single to lead off the eighth inning and, reached second base when center fielder Harry Walker mishandled the ball.[14] When Snuffy Stirnweiss hit a bunt to first baseman Ray Sanders, Lindell attempted to advance to third base. Sanders' throw reached third baseman Whitey Kurowski in time as Lindell made a head-first slide. His head bounced up into Kurowki's head forcing the third baseman to drop the ball.[14] The Yankees then proceeded to score five runs to win the game 6 to 2.[15] The play at third base was considered a turning point in the series as the Yankees went on to win the next two games and won the world championship.[16]

Lindell had his most productive season in 1944 when he led the league in triples, extra base hits, total bases, and had a .300 batting average with 18 home runs and 103 runs batted in.[1][17] Also in 1944, Lindell tied a major league record by hitting four doubles in a game,[18] and he recorded 468 putouts, the tenth best season total for an outfielder during the years he played. Lindell was drafted into the United States Army in June 1945 and only appeared in 44 games that season.[19] He was discharged from the Army in March 1946.[20]

With outfielders Joe DiMaggio, Tommy Henrich and Charlie Keller returning to the Yankees from military service after the Second World War, Lindell slipped into the role of a utility player.[21] An injury to Keller in 1947 gave him another chance to play regularly and in the 1947 World Series, Lindell had a .500 batting average, leading the team with 7 runs batted in, as the Yankees defeated the Brooklyn Dodgers in a seven-game series.[21][22] In 1948, he posted a .317 batting average with 13 home runs, 55 runs batted in and a career-high .387 on-base percentage while appearing in 88 games.

During spring training in 1949, Lindell developed a knuckleball and new Yankees manager Casey Stengel experimented with using him as a relief pitcher.[21] On October 1, 1949, during a late-season pennant race, he hit an eighth-inning, game-winning, home run against the Boston Red Sox, putting the Yankees into a tie with their Boston arch-rivals with one game left to play.[23][24][25] The Yankees went on to win the final game to clinch the American League pennant then defeated the Brooklyn Dodgers in the 1949 World Series.[26][27]

In May 1950, Lindell's contract was purchased by the St. Louis Cardinals from the Yankees.[28] After posting just a .186 batting average in 36 games for the Cardinals, he was sold to the Cardinals' minor league affiliate, the Columbus Red Birds who then traded him to the Hollywood Stars of the Brooklyn Dodgers organization.[28] The Stars' manager, Fred Haney, converted Lindell into a knuckleball pitcher and, in 1952, he won 24 games against 9 losses to help the Stars win the Pacific Coast League pennant.[29][30] He led the league in victories and strikeouts and, was voted the league's Most Valuable Player.[31] His knuckleball proved to be unpredictable as he also led the league in bases on balls.[31]

Lindell returned to the major leagues in 1953 at the age of 36 as a knuckleball pitcher, playing for the Pittsburgh Pirates, before being traded to the Philadelphia Phillies in August 1953.[28] His knuckleball proved to be difficult to control in 1953, as he led the league in bases on balls and wild pitches.[32] Although listed as a pitcher with the Pirates, he batted .286 and was used 34 times as a pinch-hitter, once tying a game with a 3-run ninth-inning home run. Lindell played his last major league game on May 9, 1954 at age 37.[1] The Phillies released him in May 1954.[28]

Career statistics

In a twelve-year major league career, Lindell played in 854 games with 762 hits in 2,795 at bats for a .273 batting average along with 72 home runs, 404 runs batted in and a .344 on-base percentage.[1] As a pitcher, he compiled an 8–18 record with a 4.47 earned run average.[1] He led American League outfielders in 1943 with a .994 fielding percentage.[33]

Lindell died of lung cancer in Laguna Beach, California on August 27, 1985, just three days before his 69th birthday.[34]

See also

References

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h "Johnny Lindell". Baseball Reference. Retrieved 11 April 2011.
  2. ^ a b "Arcadia Boy Named Student Body President at High". The Arcadia Tribune. 1 February 1935. p. 2. Retrieved 11 April 2011.
  3. ^ "Lindell Wins More Honors". The Arcadia Tribune. 24 May 1935. p. 2. Retrieved 11 April 2011.
  4. ^ "Johnny Lindell minor league statistics". Baseball Reference. Retrieved 11 April 2011.
  5. ^ "Bird Hurler Cops Honors". Youngstown Vindicator. Associated Press. 30 November 1940. p. 6. Retrieved 11 April 2011.
  6. ^ "1941 International League Pitching Leaders". Baseball Reference. Retrieved 11 April 2011.
  7. ^ "Two Playoff Games Billed Today". Saskatoon Star-Phoenix. Associated Press. 9 September 1941. p. 10. Retrieved 11 April 2011.
  8. ^ "Top Men In Major Leagues Selected In News Rating". Painesville Telegraph. 31 December 1941. p. 8. Retrieved 11 April 2011.
  9. ^ a b "Yanks Try To Convert Lindell Into Infielder". The Milwaukee Journal. Associated Press. 19 March 1943. p. 2. Retrieved 11 April 2011.
  10. ^ a b "Metheny Succeeds With New York Yankees". The Montreal Gazette. Associated Press. 22 July 1943. p. 2. Retrieved 11 April 2011.
  11. ^ "1943 Johnny Lindell batting log". Baseball Reference. Retrieved 11 April 2011.
  12. ^ "1943 All-Star Game". Baseball Reference. Retrieved 11 April 2011.
  13. ^ "1943 American League Team Statistics and Standings". Baseball Reference. Retrieved 21 July 2011.
  14. ^ a b c "Lindell-Kurowski Crash Big Break In Series So Far". Ellensburg Daily Record. Associated Press. 8 October 1943. p. 6. Retrieved 11 April 2011.
  15. ^ "1943 World Series Game 3 box score". Baseball Reference. Retrieved 11 April 2011.
  16. ^ "1943 World Series". Baseball Reference. Retrieved 11 April 2011.
  17. ^ "1944 American League Batting Leaders". Baseball Reference. Retrieved 12 April 2011.
  18. ^ "1944 Season Review". Baseball Almanac. Retrieved 11 April 2011.
  19. ^ "Red Sox And Reds Climbing Fast". The Calgary Herald. Associated Press. 8 June 1945. p. 17. Retrieved 11 April 2011.
  20. ^ "Cardinals Hand Yankees Fifth Straight Defeat". St. Petersburg Times. 24 March 1946. p. 21. Retrieved 11 April 2011.
  21. ^ a b c "Johnny Lindell May Become Hurler Again". The Calgary Herald. Associated Press. 7 April 1949. p. 17. Retrieved 11 April 2011.
  22. ^ "1947 World Series". Baseball Reference. Retrieved 11 April 2011.
  23. ^ "Yanks, Sox Settle Title In New York". The Victoria Advocate. Associated Press. 29 September 1949. p. 8. Retrieved 11 April 2011.
  24. ^ "October 1, 1949 Red Sox-Yankees box score". retrosheet.org. Retrieved 11 April 2011.
  25. ^ "1949 New York Yankees schedule and standings". Baseball Reference. Retrieved 11 April 2011.
  26. ^ Stump, Al (October 1959). Stumbling Down the Stretch. Baseball Digest. Books.Google.com. Retrieved 11 April 2011.
  27. ^ "1949 World Series". Baseball Reference. Retrieved 17 April 2011.
  28. ^ a b c d "Johnny Lindell Trades and Transactions". Baseball Almanac. Retrieved 11 April 2011.
  29. ^ Zimmerman, Paul (August 1951). Lindell Scores on Double. Baseball Digest. Books.Google.com. Retrieved 11 April 2011.
  30. ^ Watson, Emmett (August 1952). Lindell Finds Self Boxed In. Baseball Digest. Books.Google.com. Retrieved 11 April 2011.
  31. ^ a b "Johnny Lindell Best Pitcher". The Bulletin. United Press International. 23 September 1952. p. 2. Retrieved 11 April 2011.
  32. ^ "1953 National League Pitching Leaders". Baseball Reference. Retrieved 11 April 2011.
  33. ^ "1948 American League Fielding Leaders". Baseball Reference. Retrieved 11 April 2011.
  34. ^ "Former Yankee dies of cancer". Gettysburg Times. Associated Press. 31 August 1985. p. 2. Retrieved 11 April 2011.

External links

1941 New York Yankees season

The 1941 New York Yankees season was the 39th season for the team in New York, and its 41st season overall. The team finished with a record of 101–53, winning their 12th pennant, finishing 17 games ahead of the Boston Red Sox. New York was managed by Joe McCarthy. The Yankees played their home games at Yankee Stadium. In the World Series, they beat the Brooklyn Dodgers in 5 games.

Books and songs have been written about the 1941 season, the last before the United States became drawn into World War II. Yankees' center fielder Joe DiMaggio captured the nation's fancy with his lengthy hitting streak that extended through 56 games before finally being stopped. A big-band style song called Joltin' Joe DiMaggio was a hit for the Les Brown orchestra.

1942 New York Yankees season

The 1942 New York Yankees season was the team's 40th season in New York and its 42nd overall. The team finished with a record of 103–51, winning their 13th pennant, finishing 9 games ahead of the Boston Red Sox. New York was managed by Joe McCarthy. The Yankees played home games at Yankee Stadium. In the World Series, they lost to the St. Louis Cardinals in 5 games.

1943 New York Yankees season

The 1943 New York Yankees season was the team's 41st season in New York, and its 43rd season overall. The team finished with a record of 98–56, winning their 14th pennant, finishing 13.5 games ahead of the Washington Senators. Managed by Joe McCarthy, the Yankees played at Yankee Stadium. In the World Series, they defeated the St. Louis Cardinals in 5 games.

1944 New York Yankees season

The 1944 New York Yankees season was the team's 42nd season in New York, and its 44th season overall. The team finished in third place in the American League with a record of 83–71, finishing 6 games behind the St. Louis Browns. New York was managed by Joe McCarthy. The Yankees played their home games at Yankee Stadium.

1945 New York Yankees season

The 1945 New York Yankees season was the team's 43rd season in New York and its 45th overall. The team finished in fourth place in the American League with a record of 81–71, finishing 6.5 games behind the Detroit Tigers. New York was managed by Joe McCarthy. The Yankees played at Yankee Stadium.

1946 New York Yankees season

The 1946 New York Yankees season was the team's 44th season in New York, and its 46th overall. The team finished with a record of 87–67, finishing 17 games behind the Boston Red Sox. New York was managed by Joe McCarthy, Bill Dickey, and Johnny Neun. The Yankees played at Yankee Stadium.

1947 New York Yankees season

The 1947 New York Yankees season was the team's 45th season in New York, and its 47th season overall. The team finished with a record of 97–57, winning their 15th pennant, finishing 12 games ahead of the Detroit Tigers. New York was managed by Bucky Harris. The Yankees played their home games at Yankee Stadium. In the World Series, they defeated the Brooklyn Dodgers in 7 games. It was the first ever season of the Yankees to be broadcast live on television with WABD providing the television broadcast feed to viewers in the city.

1948 New York Yankees season

The 1948 New York Yankees season was the team's 46th season in New York and its 48th overall. The team finished with a record of 94–60, finishing 2.5 games behind the Cleveland Indians and 1.5 games behind the second-place Boston Red Sox. New York was managed by Bucky Harris. The Yankees played their home games at Yankee Stadium.

The fractional games-behind came about due to the frenzied pennant race, which saw the Yankees, Red Sox and Indians all battling it out to the end. The Yankees fell just a little short, and the Red Sox and Indians finished in a tie for first at 96–58. They held a one-game playoff, which counted as part of the regular season, so the Indians' victory raised their record to 97–58, and dropped the Red Sox to 96–59.

The Yankees did not renew Bucky Harris' contract after the season, opting instead to hire Casey Stengel starting in 1949. This move raised some eyebrows, but Stengel had just led the Oakland Oaks to the Pacific Coast League pennant in 1948, demonstrating that with good talent, he had a good chance to succeed. The Yankees were about to begin the most dominating stretch of their long dynasty.

1949 New York Yankees season

The 1949 New York Yankees season was the team's 47th season in New York, and its 49th season overall. The team finished with a record of 97–57, winning their 16th pennant, finishing 1 game ahead of the Boston Red Sox. New York was managed by Casey Stengel in his first year. The Yankees played their home games at Yankee Stadium. In the World Series, they defeated the Brooklyn Dodgers in 5 games.

1950 Brooklyn Dodgers season

The 1950 Brooklyn Dodgers struggled for much of the season, but still wound up pushing the Philadelphia Phillies to the last day of the season before falling two games short. Following the season, Branch Rickey was replaced as majority owner/team president by Walter O'Malley, who promptly fired manager Burt Shotton and replaced him with Chuck Dressen. Buzzie Bavasi was also hired as the team's first independent General Manager.

Vin Scully joined the Dodgers' radio and television crew as a play-by-play announcer in 1950; in 2016, Scully entered his 67th consecutive season with the club, the longest such tenure in the history of sports broadcasting, that season was the first wherein his voice, as well as of Red Barber's, was broadcast on television station WOR-TV, making the Dodgers the last New York City MLB team to introduce regular television broadcasts, 11 years following the first broadcasts of 1939.

1950 New York Yankees season

The 1950 New York Yankees season was the 48th season for the team in New York and its 50th overall as a franchise. The team finished with a record of 98–56, winning their 17th pennant, finishing 3 games ahead of the Detroit Tigers. In the World Series, they defeated the Philadelphia Phillies in 4 games. New York was managed by Casey Stengel. The Yankees played at Yankee Stadium.

1950 St. Louis Cardinals season

The 1950 St. Louis Cardinals season was the team's 69th season in St. Louis, Missouri and its 59th season in the National League. The Cardinals went 78–75 during the season and finished 5th in the National League.

1953 Philadelphia Phillies season

The 1953 Philadelphia Phillies season was the 71st in franchise history.

Bader Field (ballpark)

Bader Field was a baseball stadium in Atlantic City, New Jersey, United States. It was located at the Bader Field airport and was referred to by the same name as the airfield. It was named after the former mayor of Atlantic City Edward L. Bader, who purchased the land for the airfield.The New York Yankees held spring training at Bader Field in 1944. The Philadelphia Athletics considered using the ballpark for 1944 spring training. On November 17, 1943, Connie Mack examined Bader Field and the National Guard Armory as one possibility. But he knew the Yankees were already considering it. The A's went to McCurdy Field in Frederick, Maryland when the Yankees chose Atlantic City. The Yankees made the 300-room Senator Hotel their headquarters and practiced indoors at the Atlantic City Armory. They played their first exhibition game in Atlantic City on April 1, 1944, and beat the Philadelphia Phillies 5-1, behind a home run by Johnny Lindell. The following day, 4,000 fans saw the Yankees beat the Brooklyn Dodgers, 4–3. In 1945, the Boston Red Sox based their spring training at Ansley Park in nearby Pleasantville. The last spring exhibition played at Bader Field was a Red Sox-Yankees game on April 8, 1945.A municipal stadium, John Boyd Stadium, with a football field and track was opened at Bader Field on October 22, 1949. It stood just north of the ballpark's left-field wall and was built at a cost of $350,000. John Boyd Stadium was the home of Atlantic City High School football from 1949 until 1994, and was demolished in February 1998. In 1998, The Sandcastle baseball stadium was built at Bader Field, returning professional baseball to the airport site. The Atlantic City Surf played at the ballpark through 2008. The ballpark sits unused today amid discussions of redevelopment.

Cliff Mapes

Clifford Franklin Mapes (March 13, 1922 – December 5, 1996) was a professional baseball player. He played five seasons of Major League Baseball as an outfielder for the New York Yankees, St. Louis Browns and Detroit Tigers.

George McQuinn

George Hartley McQuinn (May 29, 1910 – December 24, 1978) was an American former professional baseball player who played in Major League Baseball (MLB) as a first baseman for four teams, from 1936 through 1948. He was an All-Star for six seasons. He threw and batted left-handed.

Joe Devine (scout)

Joseph Vincent Devine (March 3, 1892 – September 21, 1951) was a baseball scout for the Pittsburgh Pirates and New York Yankees, credited for signing Joe DiMaggio to the Yankees.

List of Major League Baseball annual triples leaders

In baseball, a triple is recorded when the ball is hit so that the batter is able to advance all the way to third base, scoring any runners who were already on base, with no errors by the defensive team on the play. In Major League Baseball (MLB), a player in each league is recognized for leading the league in triples. Only triples hit in a particular league count toward that league's seasonal lead.

The first triples champion in the National League was Ross Barnes; in the league's inaugural 1876 season, Barnes hit fourteen triples for the Chicago White Stockings. In 1901, the American League was established and led by two members of the Baltimore Orioles: Bill Keister and Jimmy Williams each had 21.

Monrovia High School

Monrovia High School is a public high school located in Monrovia, California, a northeastern suburb of Los Angeles, United States. Monrovia High School is the only grades 9–12 comprehensive high school in the Monrovia Unified School District. Established in 1893, the campus is located in an environment of neo-Spanish architecture, green lawns, hundred-year-old oak trees, and is nestled against the San Gabriel Mountains. The portion of the campus designed in 1928 is the work of noted Los Angeles architect John C. Austin.

In 2006, the citizens of Monrovia approved a $45 million bond for the high school. Major construction transformed the campus by adding a science building with technology labs, a gymnasium to support the physical education and sports programs, a stadium and bleachers, an overall renovation of the campus.

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