Johnny Drake

John William "Zero" Drake (March 27, 1916 – March 26, 1973) was an American football player. He was the first round pick (10th overall) by the Cleveland Rams, their first ever draft pick, in the 1937 NFL Draft. A Purdue Boilermakers running back, he led the NFL in touchdowns in the 1939 & 1940 seasons.

Johnny Drake
Position:Fullback / Halfback
Personal information
Born:March 27, 1916
Chicago, Illinois
Died:March 26, 1973 (aged 56)
Detroit, Michigan
Height:6 ft 1 in (1.85 m)
Weight:213 lb (97 kg)
Career information
High school:Chicago (IL) Bowen
College:Purdue
NFL Draft:1937 / Round: 1 / Pick: 10
Career history
Career highlights and awards
  • First Team All-Pro (1940)
  • 3× NFL All-Star (1938–1940)
Career NFL statistics
Rushing yards:1,700
Average:3.2
Touchdowns:24
Player stats at NFL.com
Player stats at PFR

External links

1936 All-Big Ten Conference football team

The 1936 All-Big Ten Conference football team consists of American football players selected to the All-Big Ten Conference teams chosen by various selectors for the 1936 Big Ten Conference football season.

1936 Big Ten Conference football season

The 1936 Big Ten Conference football season was the 41st season of college football played by the member schools of the Big Ten Conference (also known as the Western Conference) and was a part of the 1936 college football season.

The 1936 Minnesota Golden Gophers football team, under head coach Bernie Bierman, compiled a 7–1 record and was ranked No. 1 in the final AP Poll, giving Minnesota its third consecutive national championship. Tackle Ed Widseth was a consensus first-team All-American and was the first Big Ten player taken in the 1937 NFL Draft with the fourth overall pick.

The 1936 Northwestern Wildcats football team, under head coach Pappy Waldorf, compiled a 7–1 record, won the Big Ten championship, and was ranked No. 7 in the final AP Poll. The team's only loss came on the last day of the season against Notre Dame. Guard Steve Reid was a consensus first-team All-American.

The 1936 Ohio State Buckeyes football team, under head coach Francis Schmidt, compiled a 5–3 record, led the Big Ten in scoring defense (3.4 points allowed per game), and outscored opponents 160 to 27. End Merle Wendt, tackle Charley Hamrick, and guard Inwood Smith were first-team All-Big Ten players.

1938 All-Pro Team

The 1938 All-Pro Team consisted of American football players chosen by various selectors for the All-Pro team of the National Football League (NFL) for the 1938 NFL season. Teams were selected by, among others, the National Professional Football Writers Association (PFW), the United Press (UP), the International News Service (INS), Collyer's Eye (CE), and the New York Daily News (NYDN).Players displayed in bold were consensus first-team selections. Four players were selected for the first team by all five selectors: New York Giants halfback Ed Danowski; Green Bay Packers fullback Clarke Hinkle; New York Giants tackle Ed Widseth; and Chicago Bears guard Dan Fortmann. Another two were selected for the first team by four selectors: Brooklyn Dodgers quarterback Ace Parker (PFW, UP, INS, NYDN); Pittsburgh Pirates halfback Byron White (PFW, UP, INS, CE); and Green Bay Packers end Don Hutson (PFW, UP, INS, NYDN). Five players were selected for the first team by three selectors: Chicago Cardinals end Gaynell Tinsley (PFW, INS, CE); Philadelphia Eagles end Bill Hewitt (UP, CE, NYDN); Chicago Bears tackle Joe Stydahar (UP, INS, NYDN); Green Bay Packers guard Russ Letlow (PFW, INS, CE); and New York Giants center Mel Hein (UP, INS, NYDN).

1939 National Football League All-Star Game

The 1939 National Football League All-star Game was the professional football league's first-ever all-star game, sponsored by the Los Angeles Times as a charity game to benefit the Salvation Army. It pitted the New York Giants, the league's champion for the 1938 season, against a team of all-stars. The game was played on Sunday, January 15, 1939, at Wrigley Field in Los Angeles, California in front of 15,000 fans; although 30,000 spectators were expected, bad weather led to the poor attendance. The Giants defeated the all-stars by a score of 13–10.The players on the all-star squad were selected by fan balloting. For the only time in the game's history, players from teams outside the NFL were invited; five players from the Los Angeles Bulldogs and Hollywood Stars, two local teams in what would eventually become the Pacific Coast Professional Football League, were among the members of the All-Star team.

1940 All-Pro Team

The 1940 All-Pro Team consisted of American football players chosen by various selectors for the All-Pro team of the National Football League (NFL) for the 1940 NFL season. Teams were selected by, among others, the so-called "official" All-Pro team selected by 92 sports writers who were members of the Pro Football Writers Association of American (PFW), the sports writers of the Associated Press (AP), the United Press (UP), the International News Service (INS), Collyer's Eye (CE), the New York Daily News (NYDN), and the Chicago Herald American.Players displayed in bold were consensus first-team selections. Three players were selected for the first team by all seven selectors: Brooklyn Dodgers quarterback Ace Parker; Brooklyn Dodgers tackle Bruiser Kinard; and Chicago Bears guard Dan Fortmann. Four others were designated for the first team by six selectors: Cleveland Rams fullback Johnny Drake; Green Bay Packers end Don Hutson; Brooklyn Dodgers end Perry Schwartz; and New York Giants center Mel Hein. Another four players were selected by five of seven selectors: Detroit Lions halfback Byron White; Washington Redskins halfback Sammy Baugh; Chicago Bears tackle Joe Stydahar; and New York Giants center Mel Hein.

1940 National Football League All-Star Game (January)

The 1940 National Football League All-star Game was the professional football league's second all-star game. The game pitted the Green Bay Packers, the league's champion for the 1939 season, against a team of all-stars. The game was played on Sunday, January 14, 1940, at Gilmore Stadium in Los Angeles, California in front of 18,000 fans. The Packers defeated the all-stars by a score of 16–7. The game was originally scheduled to be played on the previous Sunday, but it was delayed due to rain.The players on the all-star squad were selected by a national poll of fans. Wilbur Crowell was the referee for the game.

1940 Philadelphia Eagles season

The 1940 Philadelphia Eagles season was their eighth in the National Football League. The team failed to improve on their previous output of 1–9–1, losing ten games. The team failed to qualify for the playoffs for the eighth consecutive season.

The Eagles 298 rushing yards in 1940 are the fewest in the history of the NFL. The team gained only 0.94 yards per carry.

Bowen High School (Chicago)

James H. Bowen High School (known simply as Bowen High School) is a public 4–year high school located in the South Chicago neighborhood on the south side of Chicago, Illinois, United States. Bowen is operated by the Chicago Public Schools district.

From 1993 until 2011, Bowen was divided into four smaller schools. Today, the smaller schools have been re-consolidated back into one school.

Charles Halford

Charles Halford (born February 28, 1980 in Salt Lake City, Utah) is an American actor. In 2009, he starred in the DCOM Dadnapped as Skunk. He has also co-starred in dozens of other television shows and films such as The Luck of the Irish. In 2014 he portrayed serial killer Reggie Ledoux in the first season of True Detective. Halford was a main cast member on the NBC series Constantine, portraying Francis "Chas" Chandler.

Dead Reckoning (1947 film)

Dead Reckoning is a 1947 American film noir starring Humphrey Bogart and Lizabeth Scott and featuring Morris Carnovsky. The picture was directed by John Cromwell and written by Steve Fisher and Oliver H.P. Garrett based on a story by Gerald Drayson Adams and Sidney Biddell.

History of the Cleveland Rams

The professional American football team now known as the Los Angeles Rams was established in Cleveland as the Cleveland Rams, and played there from 1936 to 1945. The Rams competed in the second American Football League (AFL) for the 1936 season and the National Football League (NFL) from 1937–1945, winning the NFL championship in 1945, before moving to Los Angeles in 1946 to become the only NFL champion ever to play the following season in another city. The move of the team to Los Angeles helped to jump-start the reintegration of pro football by African-American players and opened up the West Coast to professional sports. After being based in Los Angeles for 49 years, the Rams franchise moved again after the 1994 NFL season to St. Louis. In 2016, the team moved back to Los Angeles after 21 seasons in St. Louis.

John Drake

John Drake may refer to:

John Drake (died 1628) (1556–1628), English politician

Sir John Drake, 1st Baronet (1625–1669), English politician

John Drake (1826–1895), American hotel magnate

John Drake (1872–1964), American hotel magnate

John Drake (cricketer) (1893–1967), English cricketer

John Drake (rugby union) (1959–2008), New Zealand rugby footballer

John M. Drake (1830–1913), Union Army officer during the American Civil War

John R. Drake (1782–1857), U.S. Representative from New York

John W. Drake, American microbiologist

John Drake (mayor), medieval mayor of Dublin

John Poad Drake (1794–1883), inventor and artist

John Drake (pirate) (c. 1560–1600s), English pirate

Johnny Drake (1916–1973), American football player

List of Los Angeles Rams first-round draft picks

The Los Angeles Rams, a professional American football team based in Los Angeles, joined the National Football League (NFL) as Cleveland Rams in 1937. The Rams began playing in 1936 as a charter member of the second American Football League. Although the NFL granted membership to the same owner, the NFL considers it a separate entity. In 1946, Rams' owner Dan Reeves, fed up with poor attendance at Cleveland Stadium, moved the Rams to Los Angeles, and the team played there from 1946 to 1979. Before his death in 1979, later Rams owner Carroll Rosenbloom planned a move within the Los Angeles metropolitan area to Anaheim, using the venue now known as Angel Stadium, and his widow and successor Georgia Frontiere went through with the move in 1980, with the team still officially representing Los Angeles. The Rams moved to St. Louis in 1995 and renamed the team St. Louis Rams. In January 2016, the Rams and the NFL announced that the team would return to Los Angeles. The team now plays in its original L.A. venue, the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum, while awaiting the 2020 opening of its new stadium in suburban Inglewood.The Rams first participated in the 1938 NFL Annual Player Selection Meeting, more commonly known as the NFL Draft. The Rams did have a 1937 pick, but it was picked by the NFL for an expansion team and later the Rams were later admitted into the league before the 1937 season. Every year during April, each NFL franchise seeks to add new players to its roster through the NFL Draft. Teams are ranked in inverse order based on the previous season's record, with the worst record picking first, and the second–worst picking second and so on. The two exceptions to this order are made for teams that appeared in the previous Super Bowl; the Super Bowl champion always picks 32nd, and the Super Bowl loser always picks 31st. Teams have the option of trading away their picks to other teams for different picks, players, cash, or a combination thereof. Thus, it is not uncommon for a team's actual draft pick to differ from their assigned draft pick, or for a team to have extra or no draft picks in any round due to these trades.The Rams' first selection as an NFL team was Johnny Drake, a fullback from Purdue in 1937. The Rams have selected the number one overall five times, drafting Corbett Davis in 1938, Billy Cannon in 1960, Terry Baker in 1963, Orlando Pace in 1997, and Sam Bradford in 2010 The Rams have drafted second overall seven times and the third overall two times. Five eventual Hall of Famers were selected by the Rams: Elroy "Crazylegs" Hirsch, Merlin Olsen, Tom Mack, Jack Youngblood, and Eric Dickerson. The team's most recent first round selections are Greg Robinson, an offensive tackle from Auburn, Aaron Donald, a defensive tackle from Pittsburgh, Todd Gurley, a running back from Georgia, and Jared Goff, a quarterback from California.

List of National Football League annual rushing touchdowns leaders

This is a season-by-season list of National Football League players who have led the regular season in rushing touchdowns. Although rushing has both an offensive and a defensive meaning, this list charts offensive rushing touchdowns, usually scored by a running back, either a halfback or a fullback.

Record-keeping for rushing touchdowns began in 1932, when Bronko Nagurski of the Chicago Bears led the league with 4 rushing touchdowns. Since then, LaDainian Tomlinson has set the record for rushing touchdowns in a season, when he led the league in 2006, with 28 rushing touchdowns, while playing with the San Diego Chargers. Prior to Tomlinson's setting of the record, Priest Holmes of the Kansas City Chiefs and Shaun Alexander of the Seattle Seahawks, jointly held the record with 27, reaching that mark in 2003 NFL season and 2005, respectively.

Jim Brown holds the record for most league-leading seasons in rushing touchdowns, with 5 (1957, 1958, 1959, 1963, and 1965). Dutch Clark became the first player to lead the league in consecutive seasons (1936 and 1937), although in 1937 he co-led the league. The first sole rushing touchdowns leader in consecutive seasons was Johnny Drake, when he led in 1939 and 1940. Steve Van Buren was the first to lead the league in 3 consecutive seasons, from 1947 to 1949, a figure later matched by Jim Brown (1957 to 1959) and Leroy Kelly (1966 to 1968). Marcus Allen is the only player in NFL history to lead the league in rushing touchdowns while playing with 2 different teams; in 1982, Allen led the league while playing with the Oakland Raiders, and in 1993, he led the league while playing with the Kansas City Chiefs.

In 1943, Bill Paschal became the first NFL player to post a 10+ rushing touchdowns season, when playing for the New York Giants. 40 seasons later, in 1983, John Riggins posted the league's first 20+ rushing touchdowns season. Steve Van Buren was the first player to lead the league with consecutive 10+ rushing touchdowns seasons, in 1947 and 1948; he would add a third consecutive in 1949. Emmitt Smith posted the first consecutive league-leading 20+ rushing touchdowns seasons in 1994 and 1995–an achievement later matched by Priest Holmes, in 2003 and 2004.

Maluma (singer)

Juan Luis Londoño Arias (born 28 January 1994), known professionally as Maluma, is a Colombian reggaeton singer and songwriter, signed to Sony Music Colombia and Sony Latin. Maluma has several singles that have charted within the top 10 on Billboard Hot Latin Songs, including "Felices los 4", "Borró Cassette", "El Perdedor" and "Corazón". He has won a Latin Grammy Award and two Latin American Music Awards.

Night Tide

Night Tide is a 1961 thriller film, written and directed by Curtis Harrington and starring Dennis Hopper. It was filmed in 1960, premiered in 1961, but was held up from general release until 1963. The film was restored by the Academy Film Archive in 2007.

The Modernaires

The Modernaires is an American vocal group, best known for performing in the 1940s alongside Glenn Miller.

The Paradise Novels

The Paradise Novels is a set of three spiritually inspired novels by Ted Dekker, written mostly in 2006, and is part of a larger story called the Books of History Chronicles, along with the Circle Series and The Lost Books.

Zach Gilford

Zachary Michael "Zach" Gilford (born January 14, 1982) is an American actor best known for his role as Matt Saracen on the NBC sports drama Friday Night Lights.

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