Johnny Dawkins

Johnny Earl Dawkins Jr. (born September 28, 1963) is an American basketball coach and former player who is the head coach for the UCF men's basketball team. From 2008 to 2016, he was the head coach of Stanford. He was a two-time All-American and national player of the year as a senior in 1986 while at Duke from 1982 to 1986. Dawkins subsequently played nine seasons in the National Basketball Association (NBA) with the San Antonio Spurs (1986–1989), Philadelphia 76ers (1989–1994), and Detroit Pistons (1994–1995). From 1998 to 2008, he served as an assistant basketball coach at his alma mater, Duke.

Johnny Dawkins
Johnny Dawkins in 2010
Dawkins in 2010.
UCF Knights
PositionHead coach
LeagueAmerican Athletic Conference
Personal information
BornSeptember 28, 1963 (age 55)
Washington, D.C.
NationalityAmerican
Listed height6 ft 2 in (1.88 m)
Listed weight165 lb (75 kg)
Career information
High schoolMackin Catholic (Washington, D.C.)
CollegeDuke (1982–1986)
NBA draft1986 / Round: 1 / Pick: 10th overall
Selected by the San Antonio Spurs
Playing career1986–1995
PositionPoint guard / Shooting guard
Number24, 12
Coaching career1998–present
Career history
As player:
19861989San Antonio Spurs
19891994Philadelphia 76ers
1994–1995Detroit Pistons
As coach:
1998–1999Duke (assistant)
1999–2008Duke (associate HC)
2008–2016Stanford
2016–presentUCF
Career highlights and awards
As player:

As coach:

Career statistics
Points5,984 (11.1 ppg)
Assists2,997 (5.5 apg)
Rebounds1,336 (2.5 rpg)
Stats at Basketball-Reference.com

Playing career

College

Dawkins was born and raised in Washington, D.C. He played basketball at Mackin Catholic High School in Washington, D.C. before enrolling at Duke University. At Duke, he became the team's all-time leading scorer with 2,556 points, which stood until 2006 when J. J. Redick surpassed it.[1] In Dawkins' senior year at Duke, the 1985–86 season, the Duke Blue Devils attained a win-loss record of 37–3, which was an NCAA record for both games played and games won in a single season. They reached the 1986 NCAA championship game, where they lost to Louisville, 72–69. In his senior season, Dawkins averaged 20.2 points per game[2] and won the Naismith College Player of the Year Award, presented to the nation's top Collegiate Basketball Player. He also served as alternate on the 1984 United States Olympic basketball team. He graduated with a degree in political science.[3]

His jersey number 24 was later retired. Dawkins has received a number of honors, including selection to the ACC 50th Anniversary men's basketball team honoring the 50 greatest players in Atlantic Coast Conference history and being named the 78th greatest player in college basketball history by The Sporting News's book, Legends of College Basketball, in 2002.[3]

NBA

In the 1986 NBA Draft, Dawkins was selected by the San Antonio Spurs as the 10th pick overall. He appeared in the 1987 NBA Slam Dunk Contest, where he finished sixth out of eight. He ended up playing in the NBA for nine seasons, also appearing for the Philadelphia 76ers and the Detroit Pistons. In his NBA career, he averaged 11.1 points, 5.5 assists and 2.5 rebounds.[2]

Coaching career

Following his NBA career, Dawkins went back to Duke University in 1996, where he worked as an administrative intern in the athletic department and was on the air as an analyst for Duke's home basketball games. He joined the Duke coaching staff in 1998, working alongside head coach Mike Krzyzewski. He was promoted to associate head coach in charge of player development in 1999.[3]

In April 2008, he was named head coach at Stanford University, succeeding Trent Johnson.[4] During his time with the Cardinal, he became known as "the king of the NIT" (with crowns in 2012 and 2015). But Dawkins could not get over the hump in the NCAA tournament, with only one appearance (2014) in 8 seasons.

On March 14, 2016, at the conclusion of his eighth season, and after a disappointing one NCAA appearance in eight seasons as head coach, Dawkins was relieved of his duties as head coach.[5]

On March 23, 2016, Dawkins was hired as head coach by the University of Central Florida.[6] Shortly thereafter, his son, Aubrey Dawkins, transferred from Michigan to play for his father.

On March 2, 2019 UCF defeated (#8 AP Poll/#6 Coaches Poll) Houston at Fertitta Center stopping the nation's longest home winning streak at 33.[7] With the win UCF entered the AP Poll for the first time since the 2010–11 UCF Knights spent four weeks in the poll peaking at 19.[8]

Head coaching record

Season Team Overall Conference Standing Postseason
Stanford Cardinal (Pacific-10/Pac-12 Conference) (2008–2016)
2008–09 Stanford 20–14 6–12 9th CBI Semifinals
2009–10 Stanford 14–18 7–11 T–8th
2010–11 Stanford 15–16 7–11 T–7th
2011–12 Stanford 26–11 10–8 7th NIT Champions
2012–13 Stanford 19–15 9–9 T–6th NIT Second Round
2013–14 Stanford 23–13 10–8 T–3rd NCAA Division I Sweet Sixteen
2014–15 Stanford 24–13 9–9 T–5th NIT Champions
2015–16 Stanford 15–15 8–10 9th
Stanford: 156–115 (.576) 66–78 (.458)
UCF Knights (American Athletic Conference) (2016–present)
2016–17 UCF 24–12 11–7 4th NIT Semifinals
2017–18 UCF 19–13 9–9 6th
2018–19 UCF 24–9 13–5 T–3rd NCAA Division I Round of 32
UCF: 67–34 (.663) 33–21 (.611)
Total: 223–149 (.599)

      National champion         Postseason invitational champion  
      Conference regular season champion         Conference regular season and conference tournament champion
      Division regular season champion       Division regular season and conference tournament champion
      Conference tournament champion

References

  1. ^ "Redick Breaks Duke's Career Scoring Mark In Victory". GoDuke.com. February 19, 2006. Retrieved April 28, 2008.
  2. ^ a b "Johnny Dawkins Past Stats, Playoff Stats, Statistics, History, and Awards". databaseBasketball.com. Archived from the original on November 16, 2007. Retrieved April 28, 2008.
  3. ^ a b c "Johnny Dawkins Named Anne and Tony Joseph Director of Men's Basketball" (Press release). Stanford Department of Athletics. April 26, 2008. Archived from the original on May 1, 2008. Retrieved April 28, 2008.
  4. ^ Curtis, Jake (April 27, 2008). "Stanford hires Johnny Dawkins". San Francisco Chronicle. Retrieved April 27, 2008.
  5. ^ Parrish, Gary (March 14, 2016). "Stanford fires Johnny Dawkins after eight years as coach". cbssports.com. Retrieved March 14, 2016.
  6. ^ Glenn, Shannon (March 24, 2016). "Johnny Dawkins aims to make meaningful change at UCF". orlandosentinel.com. Retrieved March 24, 2016.
  7. ^ "Knights Down No. 6 Houston, 69-64". UCFKnights.com. March 2, 2019. Retrieved March 4, 2019.
  8. ^ "FSU climbs to No. 14 in latest AP college basketball poll, UCF cracks into top 25". FOX Sports. Associated Press. March 4, 2019. Retrieved March 4, 2019.

External links

1985 NCAA Men's Basketball All-Americans

The Consensus 1985 College Basketball All-American team, as determined by aggregating the results of four major All-American teams. To earn "consensus" status, a player must win honors from a majority of the following teams: the Associated Press, the USBWA, The United Press International and the National Association of Basketball Coaches.

1986 ACC Men's Basketball Tournament

The 1986 Atlantic Coast Conference Men's Basketball Tournament took place in Greensboro, North Carolina, at the Greensboro Coliseum from March 7–9. Duke won the championship, defeating Georgia Tech, 68–67. Johnny Dawkins of Duke was named the tournament MVP.

1986 NCAA Men's Basketball All-Americans

An All-American team is an honorary sports team composed of the best amateur players of a specific season for each team position—who in turn are given the honorific "All-America" and typically referred to as "All-American athletes", or simply "All-Americans". Although the honorees generally do not compete together as a unit, the term is used in U.S. team sports to refer to players who are selected by members of the national media. Walter Camp selected the first All-America team in the early days of American football in 1889. The 1986 NCAA Men's Basketball All-Americans are honorary lists that include All-American selections from the Associated Press (AP), the United States Basketball Writers Association (USBWA), the National Association of Basketball Coaches (NABC), and United Press International (UPI) for the 1985–86 NCAA Division I men's basketball season. All selectors chose at least a first and second 5-man team. The AP and UPI chose third teams, while NABC selected a fourth team as well; AP also lists honorable mention selections.

The Consensus 1986 College Basketball All-American team is determined by aggregating the results of the four major All-American teams. To earn "consensus" status, a player must win honors from a majority of the different All-American teams.

1994–95 Detroit Pistons season

The 1994–95 NBA season was the Pistons' 47th season in the National Basketball Association, and 38th season in the city of Detroit. After losing 60 plus games and the retirements of Bill Laimbeer and Isiah Thomas, the Pistons started a new era by drafting Grant Hill out of Duke University with the third pick in the 1994 NBA draft. The team also signed free agents Oliver Miller and Johnny Dawkins during the offseason. Hill became an immediate fan favorite leading the team with 19.9 points per game, as he was selected for the 1995 NBA All-Star Game along with Joe Dumars. However, after an 8–7 start to the season, the Pistons lost 13 of their next 14 games. They continued to struggle losing eight of their final nine games, finishing last place in the Central Division with a 28–54 record. Hill went on to share the Rookie of The Year honors with Jason Kidd of the Dallas Mavericks. Following the season, Miller left in the 1995 NBA Expansion Draft, Dawkins retired and head coach Don Chaney was fired.

For the season, the Pistons added red alternate road uniforms which lasted until the franchise's 1996 rebrand.

2011–12 Stanford Cardinal men's basketball team

The 2011–12 Stanford Cardinal men's basketball team represented Stanford University during the 2011–12 NCAA Division I men's basketball season. The Cardinal, led by fourth year head coach Johnny Dawkins, played their home games at Maples Pavilion and are members of the Pac-12 Conference. They finished with the record of 26–11 overall, 10–8 in Pac-12 play. They lost in the quarterfinals of the 2012 Pac-12 Conference Men's Basketball Tournament to California. They were invited to the 2012 National Invitation Tournament where they advanced to the championship game and defeated the Minnesota to be the 2012 NIT Champions.

2012–13 Stanford Cardinal men's basketball team

The 2012–13 Stanford Cardinal men's basketball team represented Stanford University during the 2012–13 NCAA Division I men's basketball season. The Cardinal, led by fifth year head coach Johnny Dawkins, played their home games at Maples Pavilion and were members of the Pac-12 Conference. They finished the season 19–15, 9–9 in Pac-12 play to finish in a four way tie for sixth place. They lost in the first round of the Pac-12 Tournament to Arizona State. They were invited to the 2013 NIT where they defeated Stephen F. Austin in the first round before losing in the second round to Alabama.

2013–14 Stanford Cardinal men's basketball team

The 2013–14 Stanford Cardinal men's basketball team represented Stanford University during the 2013–14 NCAA Division I men's basketball season. The Cardinal, led by sixth year head coach Johnny Dawkins, played their home games at Maples Pavilion and were members of the Pac-12 Conference.

2014–15 Stanford Cardinal men's basketball team

The 2014–15 Stanford Cardinal men's basketball team represented Stanford University during the 2014–15 NCAA Division I men's basketball season. The Cardinal, led by seventh year head coach Johnny Dawkins, played their home games at Maples Pavilion and were members of the Pac-12 Conference. They finished the season 24–13, 9–9 in Pac-12 play to finish in a tie for fifth place. They advanced to the quarterfinals of the Pac-12 Tournament where they lost to Utah. They were invited to the National Invitation Tournament where they defeated UC Davis, Rhode Island, Vanderbilt, Old Dominion, and Miami (FL) to become NIT Champions. It was Stanford's second NIT Championship in four years.

2015–16 Stanford Cardinal men's basketball team

The 2015–16 Stanford Cardinal men's basketball team represented Stanford University during the 2015–16 NCAA Division I men's basketball season. The Cardinal were led by eighth year head coach Johnny Dawkins. They played their home games at Maples Pavilion and were members of the Pac-12 Conference. They finished the season 15–15, 8–10 in Pac-12 play to finish in ninth place. They lost in the first round of the Pac-12 Tournament to Washington.

On March 14, head coach Johnny Dawkins was fired. He finished at Stanford with an eight-year record of 156–115, two NIT championships, but only one NCAA Tournament appearance.

2016–17 UCF Knights men's basketball team

The 2016–17 UCF Knights men's basketball team represented the University of Central Florida during the 2016–17 NCAA Division I men's basketball season. The Knights were members of the American Athletic Conference. The Knights, in the program's 48th season of basketball, were led by first-year head coach Johnny Dawkins and played their home games at the CFE Arena on the university's main campus in Orlando, Florida. They finished the season 24–12, 11–7 in AAC play to finish in fourth place. They defeated Memphis in the quarterfinals of the AAC Tournament before losing in the semifinals to SMU. They were invited to the National Invitation Tournament where they defeated Colorado, Illinois State and Illinois to advance to the semifinals at Madison Square Garden for the first time in school history where they lost to the eventual NIT Champion, TCU.

2017–18 UCF Knights men's basketball team

The 2017–18 UCF Knights men's basketball team represented the University of Central Florida during the 2017–18 NCAA Division I men's basketball season. The Knights are members of the American Athletic Conference. The Knights, in the program's 49th season of basketball, were led by second-year head coach Johnny Dawkins and played their home games at the CFE Arena on the university's main campus in Orlando, Florida. They finished the season 19–13 overall and 9–9 in AAC play to finish in 6th place. In the AAC Tournament, they defeated East Carolina in the first round before losing to Houston in the quarterfinals.

2018–19 UCF Knights men's basketball team

The 2018–19 UCF Knights men's basketball team represented the University of Central Florida during the 2018–19 NCAA Division I men's basketball season. The Knights are members of the American Athletic Conference. The Knights, in the program's 50th season of basketball, were led by third-year head coach Johnny Dawkins and played their home games at the CFE Arena on the university's main campus in Orlando, Florida.

Aubrey Dawkins

Aubrey Lafell Dawkins (born May 8, 1995) is an American basketball player. He played college basketball for the UCF Knights. He transferred to UCF after he completed his sophomore season for the 2015–16 Michigan Wolverines. He is the son of Johnny Dawkins who became the UCF coach following the 2015–16 NCAA Division I men's basketball season. Dawkins was raised in North Carolina until spending his high school years in Northern California at St. Francis High School and Palo Alto High School and a post graduate year in New England at New Hampton Prep. As a collegiate freshman for the 2014–15 Wolverines, he began the season on the bench, but became a starter when injuries plagued the team in January 2015. In his more prominent role later in the season, Dawkins led the 2014–15 Big Ten Conference in effective field goal percentage and true shooting percentage during conference play.

Brad Sellers

Bradley Donn Sellers (born December 17, 1962) is a retired American professional basketball player, and now the mayor of his suburban Cleveland hometown, Warrensville Heights, Ohio, as well as a basketball analyst on the Cleveland Cavaliers Radio Network.

A 7'0" power forward/center from the University of Wisconsin and Ohio State University, he was selected by the Chicago Bulls in the first round (ninth pick overall) of the 1986 NBA Draft.

Sellers was a controversial selection among the Bulls' staff and players. General manager Jerry Krause was attracted to Sellers because of his above-average shooting ability, which was rare in a player of Sellers' size. Michael Jordan and others, however, had wanted Krause to draft Johnny Dawkins, a hard-playing guard from Duke University and a friend of Jordan.Sellers eventually became a part-time starter for the Bulls, but he never averaged more than 9.5 points or 4.7 rebounds in a season, and with the emergence of forward Scottie Pippen during the 1988 NBA Playoffs, he began to see his playing time diminish. In 1989, he was finally traded to the Seattle SuperSonics for the 18th overall pick of the NBA Draft, which would become point guard B. J. Armstrong.

Sellers also played briefly for the Minnesota Timberwolves and the Detroit Pistons before leaving the NBA in 1993 to embark on a lengthy overseas career. Sellers played in Spain, Israel, Greece (Aris BC), and France before retiring in 2000 to become community liaison director for his hometown. In 1991, at the Greek Championships Final, Sellers made a 3-point-play(a basket and a foul) which won the game and gave Aris BC its last championship won until today.

Sellers also has become a media personality in Cleveland as he is a postgame analyst for Cleveland Cavaliers radio broadcasts.

Sellers was elected mayor of his native Warrensville Heights on November 8, 2011, and sworn in on January 1, 2012. He was re-elected on November 3, 2015.

List of UCF Knights men's basketball seasons

This is a list of seasons completed by the UCF Knights basketball team since the team's formation in 1969. Since that season, the Knights have played over 1,100 regular-season games, winning five conference tournament championships and seven regular season championships. The Knights are a member of the American Athletic Conference (The American), and their current head coach is Johnny Dawkins, who is in his third year with the team. The Knights play their home games at CFE Arena, which is located on the main campus of UCF in Orlando, Florida.

The University of Central Florida first fielded a varsity basketball team in the fall of 1969 under Torchy Clark. Clark would complete 14 seasons as the Knights head coach, amassing a 274–89 record. Clark did not amass a single losing season during his 14-year career, and led the Knights to the Division II Final Four in 1978. His son, Bo Clark, holds the UCF records for career points (2,886) and points in a game (70). UCF has advanced to the NCAA tournament 4 times (94, 96, 04, 05), all under coach Kirk Speraw. The Knights were the 2005 Atlantic Sun Conference regular season and tournament champions, their last season in the league.

On December 1st, 2010, the Knights upset the #16 Florida Gators 57–54, for the biggest win in program history, and giving the Knights their first victory over a top 20 opponent as well as their first victory over the Gators. Following a 10–0 start to the 2010–11 season under first year coach Donnie Jones, the Knights were nationally ranked for the first time in program history. At the time, UCF was one of nine unbeaten teams, and one of only four schools to be ranked in the BCS standings and the AP men's basketball poll. The Knights continued their rise in 2011, when they upset the defending national champions and then-ranked #4 Connecticut Huskies.

Stanford Cardinal men's basketball

The Stanford Cardinal men's basketball team represents Stanford University in Stanford, California, United States. The school's team currently competes in the Pac-12 Conference. They are coached by Jerod Haase and play their home games at Maples Pavilion.

Stanford began varsity intercollegiate competition in men's basketball in 1914. The Cardinal have won 13 conference championships (8 in the PCC and 5 in the Pac-10), the last in 2004, and one NCAA championship, in 1942. Stanford was also retroactively recognized as the pre-NCAA Tournament national champion for the 1936–37 season by the Premo-Porretta Power Poll and the Helms Athletic Foundation. The team last played in the NCAA Tournament in 2014.

The Wave (1981 film)

The Wave is a made-for-TV movie directed by Alex Grasshoff, based on The Third Wave experiment put on by teacher Ron Jones in order to explain to his students how the German populace could accept the actions of the Nazi regime during the Second World War. Though later featured as an episode of the ABC Afterschool Special series, this show debuted October 4, 1981, almost two years before being featured in the series.

It starred Bruce Davison as the teacher Ben Ross, a character based on Jones.

A novelization of the film The Wave, was released in the same year. Ron Jones' writings and Johnny Dawkins' screenplay were also basis of the 2008 German film Die Welle.

The Wave (novel)

The Wave is a 1981 young adult novel by Todd Strasser under the pen name Morton Rhue (though it has been reprinted under Todd Strasser's real name). It is a novelization of a teleplay by Johnny Dawkins for the movie The Wave, a fictionalized account of the "Third Wave" teaching experiment by Ron Jones that took place in a Ellwood P. Cubberley High School history class in Palo Alto, California. The novel by Strasser won the 1981 Massachusetts Book Award for Children's/Young Adult literature.

UCF Knights men's basketball

The UCF Knights men's basketball team represents The University of Central Florida located in Orlando, Florida, United States. UCF competes in Division I of the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA), and the American Athletic Conference (The American). The Knights play their home games in the CFE Arena located on the university's main campus. They are coached by Johnny Dawkins who was hired in 2016.The Knights have appeared in the NCAA Division II Tournament six times (1976, 1977, 1978, 1980, 1981, 1982), including the Final Four in 1978. UCF has reached the NCAA Division I Tournament five times (1994, 1996, 2004, 2005, and 2019). UCF has won twelve conference championships, seven regular season championships, and five tournament championships.

Men's basketball head coaches of the American Athletic Conference

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