Johnny Bryan

John Frederick "Johnny" Bryan (February 28, 1897 – July 1, 1966) was a professional football player for the Chicago Cardinals, Chicago Bears, and Milwaukee Badgers. He was also a player-coach and franchise owner of the Badgers in 1925 and 1926.

The Badgers franchise was turned over to Bryan after it was discovered that the team had employed four Chicago high school players for game against the Chicago Cardinals that resulted in a 59-0 loss for the Badgers. As a result of the scandal, owner Ambrose McGuirk was forced by NFL President Joe Carr to turn over his franchise to Bryan.[1][2]

Under Bryan, the team did manage to win two games in 1926 due to the arrival of end Lavern Dilweg. However Milwaukee dropped out of the NFL after that season.[3]

Johnny Bryan
Born:February 28, 1897
Chicago, Illinois, United States
Died:July 1, 1966 (aged 69)
Fort Collins, Colorado, U.S.
Career information
Position(s)Fullback, Halfback, Quarterback
Height5 ft 7 in (170 cm)
Weight157 lb (71 kg)
CollegeUniversity of Chicago
Career history
As coach
1925–1926Milwaukee Badgers
As player
1922Chicago Cardinals
1923–1925Chicago Bears
1925–1926Milwaukee Badgers
1926–1927Chicago Bears
As owner
1925–1926Milwaukee Badgers
Career stats

References

  1. ^ "Mulkern jilts Grange league". Milwaukee Sentinel. Associated Press. March 18, 1926. p. 10.
  2. ^ Reimann, George (December 3, 1981). "Pro football lived here". Milwaukee Journal. p. 3, part 3.
  3. ^ "Bryan Badgers quit pro league". Milwaukee Sentinel. July 17, 1927. p. 1, section 3.
1923 Chicago Bears season

The 1923 Chicago Bears season was their fourth regular season completed in the National Football League. The club posted a 9–2–1 record under head coach/player George Halas earning them a second-place finish in the team standings earning, the third time in the last four years. As was normal for those days, the Bears played a few games on the road at the beginning of the season and then finished the season with a 9-game homestand. The Bears started very slow, losing 2 of their first 4 games and scoring only 6 points during those games (their two wins were both won 3–0). After losing 6–0 to eventual champion Canton Bulldogs in week 4, the Bears went undefeated after that. Just like in 1922, the Sternaman brothers starred, scoring 5 touchdowns, 6 field goals, and 8 PATs between the two of them. Johnny Bryan emerged as a scoring threat as well, running for 4 scores and passing for another. Most notably, in week 6's game against the Oorang Indians, George Halas set an NFL record with a 98-yard fumble return. Jack Tatum broke it with a 104-yard Fumble Return against the Green Bay Packers in 1972 and Aeneas Williams tied that feat with a 104-yard fumble return against the Redskins in 2000.

1925 Chicago Cardinals season

The 1925 Chicago Cardinals season resulted in the Cardinals winning their first NFL championship. The 1925 championship is contested and never awarded by the NFL after the Pottsville Maroons were suspended.

The end of the Cardinals season was centered on two historic, but controversial, situations. The first was a team scandal with the Milwaukee Badgers. The scandal involved a Chicago player, Art Folz, hiring a group of high school football players to play for the Milwaukee Badgers, against the Cardinals. This would ensure an inferior opponent for Chicago. The game was used to help prop up their win–loss percentage and as a chance of wresting the 1925 championship away from the first place Pottsville Maroons. When NFL president Joseph Carr learned high school players had been used in a league game, he told reporters the 58–0 Cardinals win would be stricken from the record. However, the league had never got around to removing it and the game is still a part of the NFL records. Cardinals' owner Chris O'Brien was also fined $1,000 by Carr for allowing his team play a game against high schoolers, even though O'Brien claimed that he was unaware of the players' status. Finally Badgers' owner, Ambrose McGuirk, was ordered to sell his Milwaukee franchise within 90 days. Folz, for his role, was barred from football for life.

However, by the summer of 1926, the $1,000 fine against O'Brien was rescinded, probably since the amount would have put the Cardinals out of business. McGuirk though had already sold his Badgers franchise to Johnny Bryan, a fullback with the Chicago Bears. Two of the high school football players used in scandal even earned high school all-star recognition at the end of their season. Art Folz reportedly told the high schoolers that the game was a "practice game" and would in no part affect their amateur status.The Milwaukee scandal did have implications for the 1925 NFL Championship and the second controversy. In December 1925, the Pottsville Maroons had their title removed by the NFL and given to the Cardinals for playing in an unsanctioned game against the Notre Dame All-Stars. To this day, Pottsville residents and supporters still demand to know why Chicago was awarded the title even though they too were found by Carr to have violated the NFL's rules. According to Bob Carroll of the Professional Football Researchers Association, "The Cardinals didn't defy the league", Carroll said. "Pottsville did. It was a great team, but the owner made a mistake." However, it is still not entirely known if O'Brien knew of the high school players on the Badgers team.For his part, Cardinals owner Chris O'Brien refused to accept the championship title for his team. At the owners' meeting after the season was over, he argued that his team did not deserve to take the title over a team which had beaten them fairly. It appears that his reasons for scheduling the Milwaukee and Hammond games had been not to take the title, but rather to convince the cross-town Chicago Bears to play his team again – the Bears, with Red Grange in their roster, were a very lucrative draw. The NFL said it would revisit the issue later, but never did. It was only later, under the ownership of Charles Bidwill and his son Bill Bidwill, that the Cardinals began claiming the championship title.

1925 Chicago Cardinals–Milwaukee Badgers scandal

The 1925 Chicago Cardinals–Milwaukee Badgers scandal was a scandal centered on a 1925 game between the Chicago Cardinals and the Milwaukee Badgers of the National Football League. The scandal involved a Chicago player, Art Folz, hiring a group of high school football players to play for the Milwaukee Badgers, against the Cardinals. This would ensure an inferior opponent for Chicago. The game was used to help prop up their win-loss percentage and as a chance of wresting the 1925 Championship away from the first place Pottsville Maroons.

1925 Milwaukee Badgers season

The 1925 Milwaukee Badgers season was their fourth in the National Football League. The team failed to improve on their previous league record of 5–8, losing all their games. They tied for sixteenth place in the league.The end of the Badgers season was centered on a team scandal with the Chicago Cardinals. The scandal involved a Chicago player, Art Folz, hiring a group of high school football players to play for the Milwaukee Badgers, against the Cardinals. This would ensure an inferior opponent for Chicago. The game was used to help prop up their win-loss percentage and as a chance of wrestling away the 1925 Championship away from the first place Pottsville Maroons. When NFL President Joseph Carr learned high school players had been used in a league game, he told reporters the 59–0 Cardinals win would be stricken from the record. However, the league had never got around to removing it and the game is still a part of the NFL records. Cardinals' owner Chris O'Brien was also fined $1,000 by Carr for allowing his team play a game against high schoolers, even though O'Brien claimed that he was unaware of the players' status. Finally Badgers' owner, Ambrose McGuirk, was ordered to sell his Milwaukee franchise within 90 days. Folz, for his role, was barred from football for life.

However, by the summer of 1926, the $1,000 fine against O'Brien was rescinded, probably since the amount would have put the Cardinals out of business. McGuirk though had already sold his Badgers franchise to Johnny Bryan, a fullback with the Chicago Bears. Two of the high school football players used in scandal even earned high school all-star recognition at the end of their season. Art Folz reportedly told the high schoolers that the game was a "practice game" and would in no part affect their amateur status.The scandal did have implications for the 1925 NFL Championship, when the Pottsville Maroons had their title removed by the NFL for playing in an unsanctioned game against the Notre Dame All-Stars. To this day, Pottsville residents and supporters still demand to know why Chicago was awarded the title even though they too were found by Carr to have violated the NFL's rules.

1925 NFL season

The 1925 NFL season was the sixth regular season of the National Football League. Five new teams entered the league: New York Giants, Detroit Panthers, Pottsville Maroons, Providence Steam Roller, and a new Canton Bulldogs team. The Kenosha Maroons folded, with the Racine Legion and Minneapolis Marines mothballing.

Al Grygo

Aloysius Joseph Grygo (August 14, 1918 – September 27, 1971) was an American football running back and quarterback in the National Football League. He played for the Chicago Bears. He played college football for the South Carolina Gamecocks.

Ambrose McGuirk

Ambrose McGuirk was the first owner of the Milwaukee Badgers of the National Football League. He is best known for being ordered to sell the Badgers for his role in the 1925 Chicago Cardinals-Milwaukee Badgers scandal, in which four Chicago-area high school football players were employed by the Badgers for one game, a 59-0 loss against the Chicago Cardinals. When the scandal was discovered by NFL president Joe Carr, McGuirk was ordered to sell his Milwaukee franchise within 90 days. However Carr later decided that the penalty on McGuirk was too harsh and rescinded his earlier order. However by this time McGuirk had already sold the franchise to Chicago Bears fullback, Johnny Bryan.

Under McGuirk, the Badgers had entered the league in 1922, and through 1924 they were successful in fielding a competitive team. However 1925 saw the team go 0-6.

Bob Williams (quarterback)

Robert Allen Williams (January 2, 1930 – May 26, 2016) was an American football quarterback in the National Football League (NFL).

Dick Flanagan

Richard E. Flanagan (October 31, 1927 in Sidney, Ohio – September 27, 1997) was a National Football League center who played eight seasons. He also played RB in college and his first year with the Bears, LB until his last 2 years in the game, and OG also.

Joey Sternaman

Joseph Theodore Sternaman (February 1, 1900 – March 10, 1988) was a professional American football player, born in Springfield, Illinois, who played quarterback for nine seasons for the Chicago Bears and Duluth Kelleys. At 5'6" and 135 pounds he was called "the strongest little man I ever met" by sportswriter Grantland Rice. He played quarterback during the years Red Grange starred with the Bears. In 1926, he was the quarterback, head coach, and owner of the Chicago Bulls of the first American Football League. Joey was also the brother of Chicago Bears co-owner Dutch Sternaman.

List of Chicago Bears starting quarterbacks

These quarterbacks have started at least one game for the Chicago Bears of the National Football League. They are listed in order of the date of each player's first start at quarterback for the Bears.

Milwaukee Badgers

The Milwaukee Badgers were a professional American football team, based in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, that played in the National Football League from 1922 to 1926. The team played its home games at Athletic Park, later known as Borchert Field, on Milwaukee's north side. The team was notable for having a large number of African-American players for the time.After the team folded following the 1926 season (largely due to being left broke because of a $500 fine by the NFL for using four high-school players in a 1925 game against the Chicago Cardinals, a game arranged after the Badgers had disbanded for the season), many of its members played for the independent semi-pro Milwaukee Eagles. A few of the players from this team went on to play for the NFL's Pittsburgh Pirates in 1933. This has led some to mistakenly believe that either the Badgers or Eagles became the Pittsburgh Steelers.

The Milwaukee market is now claimed by the Green Bay Packers, who played three or four regular season games there from 1933–94, including the 1939 NFL Championship Game and the 1967 NFL Championship Game. The Packers still reserve two games a season for their old Milwaukee season ticket holders, and have their flagship radio station there as well.

Noah Mullins

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Pard Pearce

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Rusty Lisch

Russell John "Rusty" Lisch (born December 21, 1956) is a former professional American football quarterback in the National Football League. He played five seasons for the St. Louis Cardinals (1980–1983) and the Chicago Bears (1984). After 5 seasons in the NFL, Lisch only managed 1 touchdown versus 11 interceptions thrown. He retired with a 25.1 passer rating.At the University of Notre Dame, Lisch was part of Dan Devine's first recruiting class in 1975. He made his first start in place of injured Rick Slager in 1976, achieving a 40-27 victory against Miami. He started the first three games of 1977 but then would yield the starting job to Joe Montana. Lisch would finally be named the permanent starting quarterback as a fifth-year senior in 1979, winning seven of ten starts, highlighted by his 336-yard passing effort as the Irish rallied from a 17-3 deficit against South Carolina for an 18-17 victory.

Lisch's rather bad NFL career caused him to receive the "honor" as the worst player in NFL history from sports blog Deadspin in 2011, saying:

One year later, with Jim McMahon and Steve Fuller hurt, Lisch started a game for the Bears against Green Bay. He played so poorly that Mike Ditka pulled him, "for Walter Payton."His son is professional basketball player, Kevin Lisch.

Steve Bradley (American football)

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Steve Stenstrom

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Tom Farris

Thomas George Farris (September 16, 1920 – November 16, 2002) was an American football quarterback who played for the Chicago Bears (1946–1947) in National Football League the Chicago Rockets (1948) in the All-America Football Conference.

After playing college football at the University of Wisconsin, Farris was an 11th round selection (99th overall pick) of the 1942 NFL Draft by the Green Bay Packers. But before training camp, he enlisted in the United States Coast Guard to serve in World War II. He played 33 regular season games over 3 seasons. In 1946, which was his best season, he had 1 passing touchdown, 2 pass interceptions, 1 reception and 16 receiving yards.

Virgil Carter

Virgil R. Carter (born November 9, 1945) is a former professional American football quarterback who played in the National Football League and the World Football League from 1967 through 1976.

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