John Wasdin

John Truman Wasdin (born August 5, 1972) is an American former professional baseball pitcher who played in Major League Baseball (MLB) and Nippon Professional Baseball (NPB). He serves as the minor league pitching coordinator for the Baltimore Orioles.

Wasdin made his MLB debut in 1995 with the Oakland Athletics. He also played in MLB for the Boston Red Sox, Colorado Rockies, Baltimore Orioles, Toronto Blue Jays, Texas Rangers, and Pittsburgh Pirates. He played in NPB for the Yomiuri Giants in 2002 and for the Saitama Seibu Lions in 2009, his final season.

John Wasdin
SL-John-Wasdin
Wasdin with the Saitama Seibu Lions
Baltimore Orioles – No. 47
Pitcher
Born: August 5, 1972 (age 47)
Fort Belvoir, Virginia
Batted: Right Threw: Right
MLB debut
August 24, 1995, for the Oakland Athletics
Last MLB appearance
July 7, 2007, for the Pittsburgh Pirates
MLB statistics
Win–loss record39–39
Earned run average5.28
Strikeouts527
Teams

As Coach

Early years

Wasdin was born in Fort Belvoir, Virginia, but raised in Tallahassee, Florida. He graduated from Amos P. Godby High School in Tallahassee. He was drafted by the New York Yankees in the 41st round of the 1990 MLB draft, but elected to attend Florida State University. He was eventually drafted by the Oakland Athletics in the 1993 MLB draft with the 25th overall pick.[1]

Professional career

Wasdin began his career in 1993 playing for the Rookie League Arizona League Athletics, Class A Madison Muskies, and Class A-Advanced Modesto A's. He played at Modesto and with the Double-A Huntsville Stars in 1994. He began the 1995 season with the Triple-A Edmonton Trappers, but was called up to the Oakland Athletics to make his major league debut on August 24. He appeared in five games (two starts) by the season's end. He began the 1996 season at Triple-A, but was recalled to Oakland where he pitched for the rest of the season.[2]

On January 27, 1997, Wasdin was traded to the Boston Red Sox for Jose Canseco and cash considerations. He played the entire 1997 season for Boston and appeared in a major league career-high 53 games earning a 4–6 record with a 4.40 earned run average.[1] He played most of the 1998 to 2000 seasons with Boston but also spent time with the Triple-A Pawtucket Red Sox.[2] During his Red Sox career, Wasdin earned the ignominious nickname "Way back Wasdin" for giving up a lot of home runs.[3]

The Red Sox traded Wasdin along with Jeff Taglienti, Jeff Frye, and Brian Rose to the Colorado Rockies in exchange for Rolando Arrojo, Rich Croushore, Mike Lansing, and cash on July 27, 2000. He played the remainder of the season with the Rockies. Colorado released him on June 5, 2001, after beginning the season 2–1 with a 7.03 ERA. Nearly a week later, he was signed by the Baltimore Orioles. He appeared in 26 games with the Orioles and 5 with their Triple-A Rochester Red Wings. After the season, he was traded to the Philadelphia Phillies for Chris Brock. Instead of playing for the Phillies, Wasdin elected to become a free agent and signed for the 2002 season with the Yomiuri Giants of Japan's Central League.[2]

In December 2002, he signed with the Pittsburgh Pirates. In 2003, he played 18 games for the Triple-A Nashville Sounds. On April 7, 2003, his first start of the season, Wasdin pitched a perfect game for the Sounds against the Albuquerque Isotopes at Herschel Greer Stadium in Nashville, Tennessee.[4] In all, Wasdin struck out 15 batters.[5] Five ground outs and seven fly outs accounted for his other outs in the game.[6] This was the sixth perfect game and second nine-inning perfect game in the history of the Pacific Coast League, which was established in 1903.[7] He was also selected for the 2003 Triple-A All-Star Game, but was unable to participate after being traded to the Toronto Blue Jays for Rich Thompson on July 8.[8] He appeared in 23 games for the Blue Jays before being sent to the Triple-A Syracuse SkyChiefs for the rest of the season.[2]

Wasdin signed with the Texas Rangers for the 2004 season. He went back and forth between Texas and their Triple-A Oklahoma Redhawks from 2004 to 2006. On August 1, 2006, he was designated for assignment and was placed on unconditional waivers for the purpose of granting him his release on August 3. Wasdin was signed to a minor league contract by the Pittsburgh Pirates during the 2006 winter meetings and made the team during the last week of spring training in 2007. He also spent time with the Triple-A Indianapolis Indians that year. On November 19, 2007, he signed a minor league the St. Louis Cardinals, and spent the entire 2008 season playing for the Triple-A Memphis Redbirds. He played the 2009 season for the Saitama Seibu Lions of Japan's Pacific League.

Coaching

After retiring from playing, Wasdin was hired in 2010 as the high school baseball coach at University Christian School in Jacksonville, Florida.[9]

In 2011, the Oakland Athletics hired him to be the pitching coach for the Vermont Lake Monsters, their New York–Penn League Class A-Short Season affiliate. In 2012, he advanced to the Burlington Bees (Class A Midwest League). That season he was moved up to the Midland RockHounds (Double-A Texas League) where he served as pitching coach through 2016. He left the Athletics organization to become the minor league pitching coordinator for the Baltimore Orioles in January 2017.[10] In January 2019, Wasdin was promoted to bullpen coach.

Pitches

Wasdin's pitches were tracked by PITCHf/x during a game on April 20, 2007. The data from that game shows him throwing a four-seam fastball and sinker at 90–91 mph, a curveball at 79 mph, and a changeup at 81.[11]

References

  1. ^ a b "John Wasdin Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference. Sports Reference. Retrieved April 9, 2015.
  2. ^ a b c d "John Wasdin Minor League Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference. Sports Reference. Retrieved April 9, 2015.
  3. ^ The Red Sox Fan Handbook. Rounder Books. March 2005. p. 265. ISBN 9781579401108.
  4. ^ "Wasdin Perfect Game". Nashville Sounds. Minor League Baseball. Retrieved April 9, 2015.
  5. ^ "Wasdin Tosses Perfect Game". Baseball America. April 7, 2003. Archived from the original on April 9, 2015. Retrieved April 9, 2015.
  6. ^ "Albuquerque Isotopes at Nashville Sounds - April 7, 2003 at Nashville, Tenn" (PDF). Minor League Baseball. April 7, 2003. Retrieved April 9, 2015.
  7. ^ "Pacific Coast League No-hit Games". Pacific Coast League. Minor League Baseball. Retrieved April 9, 2015.
  8. ^ "John Wasdin To Start Against Sounds On Saturday". Our Sports Central. April 21, 2004. Retrieved October 23, 2018.
  9. ^ "Former big-leaguer John Wasdin is new baseball coach at University Christian". The Florida-Times Union. July 19, 2010. Retrieved January 5, 2017.
  10. ^ "A's add Don Schulze to Midland coaching staff". MLB.com. January 4, 2017. Retrieved January 4, 2017.
  11. ^ "BrooksBaseball.net: PITCHf/x Tool". Brooks Baseball. Retrieved March 6, 2014.

External links

1991 NCAA Division I Baseball Tournament

The 1991 NCAA Division I Baseball Tournament was played at the end of the 1991 NCAA Division I baseball season to determine the national champion of college baseball. The tournament concluded with eight teams competing in the College World Series, a double-elimination tournament in its forty fifth year. Eight regional competitions were held to determine the participants in the final event. Each region was composed of six teams, resulting in 48 teams participating in the tournament at the conclusion of their regular season, and in some cases, after a conference tournament. The forty-fifth tournament's champion was LSU, coached by Skip Bertman. The Most Outstanding Player was Gary Hymel of LSU.

1992 NCAA Division I Baseball Tournament

The 1992 NCAA Division I Baseball Tournament was played at the end of the 1992 NCAA Division I baseball season to determine the national champion of college baseball. The tournament concluded with eight teams competing in the College World Series, a double-elimination tournament in its forty sixth year. Eight regional competitions were held to determine the participants in the final event. Each region was composed of six teams, resulting in 48 teams participating in the tournament at the conclusion of their regular season, and in some cases, after a conference tournament. The forty-sixth tournament's champion was Pepperdine, coached by Andy Lopez. The Most Outstanding Player was Phil Nevin of Cal State Fullerton. As of 2018 this is the last tournament in which no SEC teams have managed to advance to the College World Series.

1993 Major League Baseball draft

The 1993 Major League Baseball draft began with first round selections on June 3, 1993. Alex Rodriguez was selected first overall by the Seattle Mariners. Other notable draftees included Chris Carpenter, Torii Hunter, Jason Varitek, Scott Rolen, future NFL Hall of Famer Marshall Faulk, and Heisman Trophy winner Charlie Ward.

1996 Oakland Athletics season

The Oakland Athletics' 1996 season was the team's 29th in Oakland, California. It was also the 96th season in franchise history. The team finished third in the American League West with a record of 78-84.

The 1996 season was the Athletics' first under manager Art Howe. It was also the team's fourth consecutive losing season. The reasons behind Oakland's mediocrity remained the same; a below-average offense failed to offset an awful pitching staff. The Athletics' starting rotation, once again, was in shambles; none of the Athletics' six primary starters (Don Wengert, Doug Johns, John Wasdin, Ariel Prieto, Steve Wojciechowski, and Dave Telgheder) managed to win more than eight games. Oakland's bullpen also ranked among the league's worst. Reliever Carlos Reyes lead all pitchers in strikeouts with 78. All told, the A's boasted a team ERA of 5.20; this was the 10th best total in the 14-team American League.

The Athletics' offense was only slightly better. As had been the case in prior years, slugger Mark McGwire was the main draw; he crushed a league-high (and Oakland franchise record) 52 home runs in 1996. Designated hitter Gerónimo Berroa and catcher Terry Steinbach belted 36 and 35 home runs, respectively; secondary hitters Scott Brosius, Jason Giambi, and Ernie Young contributed 22, 20, and 19. The Athletics, as a team, hit 243 home runs (the American League's third-most); a low team batting average, however, ensured that they would finish the season with only 861 runs (the American League's 10th best total).

The Athletics hovered around the .500-mark for almost all of the season. They were not expected to contend in 1996, and indeed did not; they ultimately finished 12 games behind the first-time AL West Champion Texas Rangers.

1997 Boston Red Sox season

The 1997 Boston Red Sox season was the 97th season in the franchise's Major League Baseball history. The Red Sox finished fourth in the American League East with a record of 78 wins and 84 losses, 20 games behind the Baltimore Orioles. It was the last time the Red Sox had a losing record until 2012. The Red Sox had 5,781 at bats, a single season major league record.

1998 Boston Red Sox season

The 1998 Boston Red Sox season was the 98th season in the franchise's Major League Baseball history. The Red Sox finished second in the American League East with a record of 92 wins and 70 losses, 22 games behind the New York Yankees. The Red Sox qualified for the postseason as the AL wild card, but lost to the American League Central champion Cleveland Indians in the ALDS.

1999 American League Division Series

The 1999 American League Division Series (ALDS), the opening round of the 1999 American League playoffs, began on Tuesday, October 5, and ended on Monday, October 11, with the champions of the three AL divisions—along with a "wild card" team—participating in two best-of-five series. The teams, which were identical to those qualifying in 1998, were:

(1) New York Yankees (Eastern Division champion, 98–64) vs. (3) Texas Rangers (Western Division champion, 95–67): Yankees win the series, 3–0.

(2) Cleveland Indians (Central Division champion, 97–65) vs. (4) Boston Red Sox (Wild Card, 94–68): Red Sox win the series, 3–2.The Yankees rolled over the Rangers, who scored 945 runs in 1999, for the second straight year three games to none. The Red Sox battled back down two games to none against a Cleveland Indians team that was the first to score 1,000 runs in a season in nearly 50 years and won the Series three games to two, thanks to Pedro Martínez. The Yankees would go on to defeat the Red Sox four games to one in their first-ever meeting in the postseason in the AL Championship Series, and would then go on to sweep the National League champion Atlanta Braves in the 1999 World Series.

2000 Boston Red Sox season

The 2000 Boston Red Sox season was the 100th season in the franchise's Major League Baseball history. The Red Sox finished second in the American League East with a record of 85 wins and 77 losses, 2½ games behind the New York Yankees. The Red Sox did not qualify for the postseason, as the AL wild card was the Seattle Mariners who had finished second in the American League West with a record of 91–71.

2000 Colorado Rockies season

The Colorado Rockies' 2000 season was the eighth for the Rockies. They competed in the National League West. Buddy Bell was their manager. They played home games at Coors Field. They finished with a record of 82-80, 4th in the NL West.

2001 Baltimore Orioles season

The 2001 Baltimore Orioles season involved the Orioles finishing 4th in the American League East with a record of 63 wins and 98 losses. It would also be the final season for Hall of Famer Cal Ripken Jr.

Amos P. Godby High School

Amos P. Godby High School is a public high school in Tallahassee, Florida, named for Amos P. Godby, who first served as a teacher and coach at Leon High School, and later became Leon County Superintendent and President and Secretary of the Florida Superintendents Association.

Colorado Rockies all-time roster

This list is complete and up-to-date as of December 31, 2014.The following is a list of players, both past and current, who appeared at least in one game for the Colorado Rockies franchise.

Humberto Cota

Humberto Cota (born February 7, 1979) is a Mexican former professional baseball catcher. He played with the Pittsburgh Pirates of Major League Baseball (MLB).

Hyannis Harbor Hawks

The Hyannis Harbor Hawks, formerly the Hyannis Mets, are a collegiate summer baseball team based in Hyannis, Massachusetts. The team is a member of the Cape Cod Baseball League (CCBL) and plays in the league's Western Division. The Harbor Hawks play their home games at Judy Walden Scarafile Field at McKeon Park. The team is owned and operated by the non-profit Hyannis Athletic Association. The team was formerly known as the Hyannis Mets but changed its nickname to "Harbor Hawks" for the 2010 season in response to a licensing agreement between the CCBL and Major League Baseball.

Hyannis most recently won the CCBL championship in 1991 when they defeated the Chatham A's two games to none to win the best of three championship series. The title was the third in team history, having won back-to-back league championships in 1978 and 1979. Hyannis joined the CCBL in 1976 as an expansion team, bringing the number of teams in the league at the time to eight. The team has been led since 2009 by Judson University field manager Chad Gassman.

List of Japanese baseball players

This list consists of players who have played in Nippon Professional Baseball. Non-Japanese players who played in Japan are also included in this list.

List of Nashville Sounds broadcasters

The Nashville Sounds Minor League Baseball team has played in Nashville, Tennessee, since its establishment in 1978. The team was created as an expansion team of the Double-A Southern League, but moved to the Triple-A American Association in 1985 and to the Triple-A Pacific Coast League (PCL) in 1998. In the history of the franchise, the Sounds have employed seven play-by-play announcers to provide running commentary for their games' radio broadcasts on thirteen radio stations.

During the inaugural 1978 season, Sounds games were broadcast on WMTS by station owner Monte Hale, who also called football and basketball games for the Middle Tennessee Blue Raiders. WMTS, located some 30 miles (48 km) away in Murfreesboro, was selected because it was the only station to make a firm offer to purchase broadcasting rights. The team and station received numerous complaints from listeners who were unable to pick up the signal in Nashville and surrounding communities. In response, the team switched to WKDA, which had wider reception, in 1979. This was the first of many such times the team would switch stations to either broaden the reach of their broadcasts or for business reasons. Along with a new station for 1979, Bob Jamison of the International League's Richmond Braves was hired to announce games. He was behind the microphone for Nashville's 1979 and 1982 Southern League championship seasons. In 1980 and 1982, Jamison was recognized as the Southern League Broadcaster of the Year. He was also chosen to represent the American Association on the 1990 Triple-A All-Star Game broadcast team. Jamison served as the Sounds' play-by-play voice for 12 years until being hired to fill the same role with Major League Baseball's California Angels in 1991.The announcer's seat was then filled by Steve Carroll, who had spent the previous three seasons with the Southern League's Huntsville Stars. He helped call the 1994 Triple-A All-Star Game, which was held at Nashville's Herschel Greer Stadium. Carroll left to become the radio voice of the National Hockey League's Philadelphia Flyers after the 1995 campaign. Steve Selby, another former Huntsville announcer, moved up to Nashville in 1996. Chuck Valenches, formerly an assistant broadcaster with Selby over the two previous seasons and of the Southern League's Jacksonville Suns for two years prior to that, was promoted to the lead role in 2000. He was the PCL's representative on the 2001 Triple-A All-Star Game broadcast team. Valenches called the Sounds' 2005 PCL championship season as well as two perfect games by Nashville pitchers: one by John Wasdin in 2003 and one by Manny Parra in 2007. Stu Paul, who had been with the Texas League's San Antonio Missions for nine seasons, was hired to call games beginning in 2010. Jeff Hem became the team's play-by-play announcer in 2012 after serving in the same capacity with the Midwest League's Kane County Cougars for seven seasons. He was on the call for the Sounds's final season at Greer Stadium in 2014 and their first season at First Tennessee Park in 2015.From 1978 to 1999, games were sporadically televised in the Nashville market. The first game to be shown live from Greer was the September 1, 1978, inaugural season home finale on WDCN. In 1979, five road games were scheduled for broadcast on WNGE. From 1982 to 1992, games occasionally aired on WZTV, including ten games in 1983 and 1984, eight games in 1987, and four games in 1988. WNPX broadcast five games in 1999. Excluding the 1979 season, when play-by-play commentary was handled by Dick Palmer, the Sounds' radio announcers also provided television commentary.As of 2019, all Sounds home and road games are broadcast on WNRQ-HD2 97.5 FM. Live audio broadcasts are also available online through the team's website and the MiLB First Pitch, iHeartRadio, and TuneIn apps. Games can be viewed through the MiLB.TV subscription feature of the official website of Minor League Baseball, with audio provided by a radio simulcast.

List of Nashville Sounds no-hitters

Since the Nashville Sounds Minor League Baseball team was established in Nashville, Tennessee, in the 1978 season, its pitchers have pitched seven no-hitters, which include two perfect games. The feats were accomplished by a total of 12 different pitchers. Five were complete games pitched by a lone pitcher, and two were combined no-hitters. One occurred while the team was a member of the Double-A Southern League, two while in the Triple-A American Association, and four in the Triple-A Pacific Coast League (PCL). Of the three nine-inning perfect games pitched since the PCL was formed in 1903, two have been thrown by Nashville's pitchers.The team's first no-hitter was Jim Deshaies' 5–1 win over the Columbus Astros on May 4, 1984, at the Sounds' first home ballpark, Herschel Greer Stadium. In the second inning, Deshaies walked three batters and hit another, accounting for the only Astros run of the game, the second game of a seven-inning doubleheader. The second no-hitter was thrown by Bryan Kelly on July 17, 1985. Jack Armstrong tossed the club's third no-hitter, one walk shy of perfection, on August 7, 1988. The previous night, Indianapolis Indians pitchers Randy Johnson and Pat Pacillo pitched a no-hit game against the Sounds, but lost. That game was won by Nashville when Lenny Harris walked to first base, stole second base, stole third base, and then came home, scoring on a groundout.On April 7, 2003, John Wasdin became the first Sound to pitch a perfect game. This was only the second nine-inning complete perfect game in PCL history. Wasdin threw 100 pitches, striking out 15 batters. On July 15, 2006, hurlers Carlos Villanueva (6 IP), Mike Meyers (2 IP), and Alec Zumwalt (1 IP) combined to pitch Nashville's fifth no-hit game. Manny Parra pitched the franchise's second perfect game on June 25, 2007. He threw 107 pitches and struck out 11 hitters in the third nine-inning complete perfect game in PCL history. Most recently, Chris Smith (6 IP), Sean Doolittle (1 IP), Tucker Healy (1 IP), and Simón Castro (1 IP) pitched a combined no-hitter on June 7, 2017.

List of Nippon Professional Baseball players (W)

The following is a list of Nippon Professional Baseball players with the last name starting with W, retired or active.

Rolando Arrojo

Luis Rolando Arrojo Avila (born July 18, 1968) is a retired Major League Baseball pitcher who pitched from 1998 to 2002.

Arrojo made his mark with the teams from Villa Clara in the Cuban National Series, where he still is the all-time leader in hit batsmen. He was the staff ace on the Villa Clara team that won 3 consecutive Cuban National Series in 1993, 1994, and 1995. He was a member of the 1992 Olympic team that won the gold medal.

After defecting from the Cuban national team just before the 1996 Summer Olympics, Arrojo signed with the Tampa Bay Devil Rays in 1997—one year before the team started playing, as that expansion team (along with the Arizona Diamondbacks) was permitted to start and maintain a minor league system starting that year. He made his debut with the expansion Devil Rays in 1998 and was an immediate sensation, becoming the team's first All-Star. He finished 1998 with a strong 14–12 record and a 3.56 ERA in 202 innings, for a team that finished 63-99.

However, in 1999, with teams and hitters more familiar with him and with his developing health problems (as critics claimed, these health problems were due to a lack of conditioning by Arrojo and his refusal to listen to coaches), Arrojo's numbers began to deteriorate, and he showed signs of inability to get left-handed hitters out. He pitched just ​140 2⁄3 innings with a 5.18 ERA. After the season, the Devil Rays traded him to the Colorado Rockies with Aaron Ledesma for Vinny Castilla. Late in 2000, the Rockies in turn traded him with Rich Croushore, Mike Lansing, and cash to the Boston Red Sox for Jeff Frye, Brian Rose, John Wasdin, and minor leaguer Jeff Taglienti. Arrojo spent the rest of the season in the Red Sox rotation, but was largely ineffective. He spent the following two seasons as a part-time starter and a part-time reliever for the Red Sox with moderate success. He was not re-signed after the 2002 season and finished his career with four appearances for the New York Yankees' Triple-A affiliate in Columbus in 2003.

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