John Valentin

John William Valentin (born February 18, 1967) is a former shortstop and third baseman in Major League Baseball (MLB). He played most of his major league career with the Boston Red Sox, with his final season being for the New York Mets. He batted and threw right-handed. He was also a coach for the Los Angeles Dodgers.

John Valentin
Shortstop / Third baseman
Born: February 18, 1967 (age 52)
Mineola, New York
Batted: Right Threw: Right
MLB debut
July 27, 1992, for the Boston Red Sox
Last MLB appearance
September 29, 2002, for the New York Mets
MLB statistics
Batting average.279
Home runs124
Runs batted in558
Teams
Career highlights and awards

College career

Valentin attended Seton Hall University, where he played college baseball for the Pirates under head coach Mike Sheppard. Valentin's teammates included future major leaguers Mo Vaughn and Craig Biggio. He was drafted by the Boston Red Sox in the 5th round of the 1988 MLB Draft.

Professional career

Valentin made his MLB debut as the starting shortstop against the Texas Rangers on July 27, 1992. He had one hit in four at-bats in his debut, with his first hit coming on an RBI single to short in the bottom of the 8th inning off of the Rangers Terry Mathews. He hit his first home run on August 22, 1992, off of Mike Schooler of the Seattle Mariners.

On July 8, 1994, Valentin turned the 10th unassisted triple play in MLB history, in a game against the Mariners. In the 6th inning, Valentin playing shortstop, caught Marc Newfield's line drive, tagged second base before Mike Blowers could return to tag up, and tagged out Keith Mitchell who had been attempting to advance to second base.

His best season was 1995, when he batted .298 with 27 home runs, 37 doubles, 20 stolen bases and 81 walks. Valentin finished ninth in the American League MVP voting, and helped lead the Red Sox to its first division title since 1990. Valentin had a .971 fielding percentage in his first three years as a shortstop for the Red Sox.

On June 6, 1996, he hit for the cycle. During the 1996 season, Red Sox prospect Nomar Garciaparra battled for the spot of shortstop with Valentin, who had held the position for his entire career. Garciaparra took over the shortstop position in 1997, forcing Valentin to second base. Later that season, he shifted to third base after the regular third baseman, Tim Naehring, was injured. Valentin spent four more seasons with the Red Sox (playing only a total of 30 games over his last two years in a Red Sox uniform, the 2000 and 2001 seasons)

He signed with the New York Mets as a free agent after the 2001 season and played in 114 games for them in 2002.

In 11 seasons with the Red Sox and Mets, Valentin had a .279 batting average, and accumulated a total of 1093 hits. He hit 124 career home runs, and had 558 runs batted in.

Valentin is the only Major League player to have pulled off an unassisted triple play, hit for the cycle and hit three home runs in a game.[1]

Post-playing days

In January 2008, Valentin joined the Inland Empire 66ers of San Bernardino (the High-A minor league affiliate of the Los Angeles Dodgers) as hitting coach for the 2008 season.[2] Shortly after accepting this assignment, manager Dave Collins resigned for personal reasons, and Valentin was promoted to manager of the 66ers [1]. On Friday, October 31, 2008, he was named manager of the Chattanooga Lookouts of the Southern League (AA). After one season at the helm of the Lookouts he was demoted to hitting coach for the 2010 season. In 2011, he was promoted to the coaching staff of the AAA Albuquerque Isotopes. On November 13, 2012, he joined the Dodgers Major League staff as the Assistant Hitting Coach.[3] In 2016, the Dodgers reassigned him as the hitting coach for the Class-A Great Lakes Loons of the Midwest League.[4]

Valentin has been a resident of Holmdel Township, New Jersey.[5] He owned the now-closed Julia's Restaurant in Atlantic Highlands, New Jersey.

See also

Footnotes

  1. ^ Snyder, John (2009). 365 Oddball Days in Red Sox History. United States: Clerisy Press. p. 384. ISBN 1578603447..
  2. ^ ie66ers.com: "66ers Staff Set For 2008"
  3. ^ "Dodgers Announce 2013 Coaching Staff" (Press release). MLB.com. November 13, 2012.
  4. ^ Great Lakes Loons (January 14, 2016). "Dodgers Finalize 2016 Loons Staff". milb.com. Retrieved January 14, 2016.
  5. ^ Feuer, Alan. "He's a Team Player. Just Ask His Neighbors.", The New York Times, March 28, 1999. Accessed March 15, 2011. "By all accounts, Mr. Valentin, who has an unpublished number in Holmdel and is now working out with the Red Sox in preparation for the baseball season, was a pleasure to deal with, Mrs. Flinn and others said."

References

  • Grossman, Leigh (compiler). The Red Sox Fan Handbook. Pomfret, Connecticut: Swordsmith Books. ISBN 1-931013-03-9. Pgs. 180–181.
  • Stout, Glenn and Johnson, Richard A. Red Sox Century. New York: Houghton Mifflin Company. ISBN 0-395-88417-9. Pg. 432.

External links

Achievements
Preceded by
John Mabry
Hitting for the cycle
June 6, 1996
Succeeded by
Alex Ochoa
1994 Boston Red Sox season

The 1994 Boston Red Sox season was the 94th season in the franchise's Major League Baseball history. The season was cut short by the 1994–95 Major League Baseball strike, and there was no postseason. When the strike started on August 12, the Red Sox were in fourth place in the American League East with a record of 54 wins and 61 losses, 17 games behind the New York Yankees.

1995 Boston Red Sox season

The 1995 Boston Red Sox season was the 95th season in the franchise's Major League Baseball history. The Red Sox finished first in the American League East with a record of 86 wins and 58 losses, as teams played 144 games (instead of the normal 162) due to the 1994–95 Major League Baseball strike. The Red Sox then lost to the American League Central champion Cleveland Indians in the ALDS.

1995 Major League Baseball season

The 1995 Major League Baseball season was the first season to be played under the expanded postseason format, as the League Division Series (LDS) was played in both the American and National leagues for the first time. However, due to the 1994–95 Major League Baseball strike which carried into the 1995 season, a shortened 144-game schedule commenced on April 25, when the Florida Marlins played host to the Los Angeles Dodgers.

The Atlanta Braves became the first franchise to win World Series championships for three different cities. Along with their 1995 title, the Braves won in 1914 as the Boston Braves, and in 1957 as the Milwaukee Braves.

1996 Boston Red Sox season

The 1996 Boston Red Sox season was the 96th season in the franchise's Major League Baseball history. The Red Sox finished third in the American League East with a record of 85 wins and 77 losses, seven games behind the New York Yankees.

1997 Boston Red Sox season

The 1997 Boston Red Sox season was the 97th season in the franchise's Major League Baseball history. The Red Sox finished fourth in the American League East with a record of 78 wins and 84 losses, 20 games behind the Baltimore Orioles. It was the last time the Red Sox had a losing record until 2012. The Red Sox had 5,781 at bats, a single season major league record.

1998 American League Division Series

The 1998 American League Division Series (ALDS), the opening round of the 1998 American League playoffs, began on Tuesday, September 29, and ended on Saturday, October 3, with the champions of the three AL divisions—along with a "wild card" team—participating in two best-of-five series. The teams were:

(1) New York Yankees (Eastern Division champion, 114–48) vs. (3) Texas Rangers (Western Division champion, 88–74): Yankees win series, 3–0.

(2) Cleveland Indians (Central Division champion, 89–73) vs. (4) Boston Red Sox (Wild Card, 92–70): Indians win series, 3–1.The New York Yankees and Cleveland Indians went on to meet in the AL Championship Series (ALCS). The Yankees became the American League champion, and defeated the National League champion San Diego Padres in the 1998 World Series.

1998 Boston Red Sox season

The 1998 Boston Red Sox season was the 98th season in the franchise's Major League Baseball history. The Red Sox finished second in the American League East with a record of 92 wins and 70 losses, 22 games behind the New York Yankees. The Red Sox qualified for the postseason as the AL wild card, but lost to the American League Central champion Cleveland Indians in the ALDS.

1999 American League Championship Series

The 1999 American League Championship Series (ALCS) was a matchup between the East Division Champion New York Yankees (98–64) and the Wild Card Boston Red Sox (94–68). The Yankees had advanced to the Series after sweeping the West Division Champion Texas Rangers in the AL Division Series for the second consecutive year, and the Red Sox advanced by beating the Central Division Champion Cleveland Indians three games to two. The Yankees won the series, 4-1. They won their 36th American League pennant and went on to win the World Series against the Atlanta Braves.

1999 American League Division Series

The 1999 American League Division Series (ALDS), the opening round of the 1999 American League playoffs, began on Tuesday, October 5, and ended on Monday, October 11, with the champions of the three AL divisions—along with a "wild card" team—participating in two best-of-five series. The teams, which were identical to those qualifying in 1998, were:

(1) New York Yankees (Eastern Division champion, 98–64) vs. (3) Texas Rangers (Western Division champion, 95–67): Yankees win the series, 3–0.

(2) Cleveland Indians (Central Division champion, 97–65) vs. (4) Boston Red Sox (Wild Card, 94–68): Red Sox win the series, 3–2.The Yankees rolled over the Rangers, who scored 945 runs in 1999, for the second straight year three games to none. The Red Sox battled back down two games to none against a Cleveland Indians team that was the first to score 1,000 runs in a season in nearly 50 years and won the Series three games to two, thanks to Pedro Martínez. The Yankees would go on to defeat the Red Sox four games to one in their first-ever meeting in the postseason in the AL Championship Series, and would then go on to sweep the National League champion Atlanta Braves in the 1999 World Series.

1999 Boston Red Sox season

The 1999 Boston Red Sox season was the 99th season in the franchise's Major League Baseball history. The Red Sox finished second in the American League East with a record of 94 wins and 68 losses, four games behind the New York Yankees. The Red Sox qualified for the postseason as the AL wild card, and defeated the American League Central champion Cleveland Indians in the ALDS. The Red Sox then lost to the Yankees in the ALCS.

Pedro Martínez won the American League Cy Young Award, becoming the second pitcher to win the award in both leagues. Additionally, Jimy Williams was named the American League Manager of the Year.

2000 Boston Red Sox season

The 2000 Boston Red Sox season was the 100th season in the franchise's Major League Baseball history. The Red Sox finished second in the American League East with a record of 85 wins and 77 losses, 2½ games behind the New York Yankees. The Red Sox did not qualify for the postseason, as the AL wild card was the Seattle Mariners who had finished second in the American League West with a record of 91–71.

Boston Red Sox Hall of Fame

The Boston Red Sox Hall of Fame was instituted in 1995 to recognize the careers of former Boston Red Sox baseball players. A 15-member selection committee of Red Sox broadcasters and executives, past and present media personnel, and representatives from The Sports Museum of New England and the BoSox Club are responsible for nominating candidates.

Hyannis Harbor Hawks

The Hyannis Harbor Hawks, formerly the Hyannis Mets, are a collegiate summer baseball team based in Hyannis, MA. The team is a member of the Cape Cod Baseball League and plays in the league's Western Division. Hyannis currently plays its home games at McKeon Park, which opened for play in 1979. The team is owned and operated by the non-profit Hyannis Athletic Association and, like other Cape League teams, are funded through merchandise sales, donations, and other fundraising efforts at games such as fifty-fifty raffles.

Hyannis finished the 2007 season in third place in the Western Division with 43 points, falling a single point shy of earning a playoff berth. Hyannis qualified for the playoffs in 2011 after winning the division in the regular season, but were swept in the Division Semi-Finals by the Falmouth Commodores.

The Harbor Hawks finished first place in the Western Division in 2015, only to lose to the Y-D Red Sox in a deciding game 3.

Inland Empire 66ers

The Inland Empire 66ers of San Bernardino are a minor league baseball team in San Bernardino, California. They are the Class A Advanced affiliate of the Los Angeles Angels and play in the California League. The 66ers play home games at San Manuel Stadium.

List of Los Angeles Dodgers coaches

The following is a list of coaches, including position, year(s) of service(s), who appeared at least in one game for the Los Angeles Dodgers National League franchise also known previously as the Brooklyn Dodgers.

Matt Sczesny

Matthew John Sczesny [says'-nee] (September 7, 1932 – January 3, 2009) was an American infielder and manager in minor league baseball, and a longtime scout for the Boston Red Sox of the American League. Sczesny, a native of Flushing, New York, spent 55 years in baseball, all of them in the Red Sox organization.

Sczesny graduated from Bishop Loughlin Memorial High School in Brooklyn, and attended St. John's University. He signed with the Red Sox in 1954 and played in their farm system through 1959, except for the 1957 campaign, which he missed while performing military service. He was named a member of the 1955 Sally League All-Star team as an infielder, while a member of the Montgomery Rebels.In 1960, Sczesny became a manager in the Boston system with the Waterloo Hawks of the Class D Midwest League, and he promptly led the Hawks to the MWL championship—the only league title he would win as a manager. However, he handled many future Major Leaguers as a skipper of Class A farm clubs in the Red Sox chain, until 1970, his final season in uniform, when he served as the first manager in the history of the Pawtucket Red Sox, then Boston's Double-A Eastern League affiliate.

In 1971, he became a scout for the Red Sox, based in Deer Park, New York, on Long Island. Sczesny scouted and signed future Red Sox stars Mo Vaughn, Bob Stanley and John Valentin, among others. In 2003, he switched from being an "area scout" tracking amateur high school and college talent to a member of the Red Sox' professional scouting corps, serving through the 2008 campaign.

He died at age 76 from cancer in West Islip, New York, on January 3, 2009.

Mineola, New York

Mineola is a village in Nassau County, Long Island, New York, United States. The population was 18,799 at the 2010 census. The name is derived from an Algonquin word meaning a "pleasant village".Most of the Incorporated Village of Mineola is in the Town of North Hempstead, with a small portion of its southern edge within the Town of Hempstead. Old Country Road runs along the village's southern border. The area serviced by the Mineola Post Office extends farther south into the adjacent village of Garden City, New York, where the county seat of Nassau County is located. Offices of many Nassau County agencies are in both Mineola and Garden City.

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