John Toner

John L. Toner (May 4, 1923 – September 23, 2014) was an American football player, coach, and college athletics administrator. He served as the head football coach at the University of Connecticut (UConn) from 1966 to 1970 and as the school's athletic director from 1969 to 1987. During his 18-year tenure as athletic director Toner also served in several roles with the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA), including as its president from 1983 to 1985. Toner was responsible for several momentous decisions in his time as athletic director at UConn, including UConn becoming a founding member of the Big East Conference in 1979, as well as the hiring of future Hall of Fame coaches Geno Auriemma and Jim Calhoun. He also oversaw the funding and construction of Gampel Pavilion.

John Toner
Biographical details
BornMay 4, 1923
Nantucket, Massachusetts
DiedSeptember 23, 2014 (aged 91)
Savannah, Georgia
Playing career
1947–1948Boston University
Position(s)Quarterback
Coaching career (HC unless noted)
early 1950sBoston University (assistant)
1954–1956New Britain HS (CT)
1957–1965Columbia (backfield)
1966–1970Connecticut
Administrative career (AD unless noted)
1969–1987Connecticut
1983–1985NCAA (president)
Head coaching record
Overall20–24–3 (college)
Accomplishments and honors
Championships
2 Yankee (1968, 1970)
Awards
NFF Distinguished American Award (1986)

Personal life

Toner was born in 1923 in Nantucket, Massachusetts.[1][2] He died at the age of 91 in 2014.[3]

Football coach

Toner became UConn's 21st head football coach in 1966.[4] In five seasons under Toner the Huskies compiled a 20–24–3 record.[5] Toner resigned as football coach at the end of the 1970 season to concentrate on his position as athletic director.[6]

Athletic director

Toner became UConn's athletic director in 1969, continuing a tradition of elevating someone from the football program to that position.[6] He served in that position for 17 years until he resigned in 1987 except to oversee the construction of Gampel Pavilion.[7]

Joining the Big East Conference

Toner was first approached about Connecticut becoming a founding member of the Big East Conference in May 1979, but was uncertain. On May 26, UConn was given a 24-hour deadline to decide whether they would join. Toner, unable to reach the university president, unilaterally accepted the invitation.[8]

NCAA

Toner served as president of the NCAA from 1983 to 1985. During his tenure, he was involved in implementing Title IX in collegiate athletics, splitting college football into Divisions I-A and I-AA, and passing new freshman eligibility rules.[9] He also was involved in Herschel Walker's leaving college early to join the United States Football League.[10]

Honors and awards

  • In 1997, the National Football Foundation inaugurated its John L. Toner Award, with Toner as the first recipient.
  • On February 28, 2009, Toner was inducted as the 29th member of the UConn Huskies of Honor.[11]

Head coaching record

College

Year Team Overall Conference Standing Bowl/playoffs
Connecticut Huskies (Yankee Conference) (1966–1970)
1966 Connecticut 2–6–1 2–2–1 3rd
1967 Connecticut 5–4 4–1 2nd
1968 Connecticut 4–6 4–1 T–1st
1969 Connecticut 5–4 3–2 T–2nd
1970 Connecticut 4–4–2 4–0–1 1st
Connecticut: 20–24–3 13–8–1
Total: 20–24–3
      National championship         Conference title         Conference division title or championship game berth

References

  1. ^ Toner, John L. "United States Public Records, 1970-2009". FamilySearch. Retrieved 25 July 2014.
  2. ^ Canfield, Owen (October 27, 1998). "Big-Time Thanks to Coach Toner". The Hartford Courant. Tribune Corporation. p. C5. Archived from the original on March 18, 2010. Retrieved March 17, 2010.
  3. ^ http://www.norwichbulletin.com/article/20140923/SPORTS/140929788/2000/NEWS
  4. ^ Shea, Jim (1995). Huskymania: The inside story of the rise of UConn's men's and women's basketball teams (1st ed.). New York: Villard. p. 36. ISBN 978-0-679-44887-7.
  5. ^ UConn Athletic Communications (2009). 2009 University of Connecticut Football Media Guide (pdf). University of Connecticut. p. 119. Retrieved February 21, 2010.
  6. ^ a b Shea, Jim (1995). Huskymania: The inside story of the rise of UConn's men's and women's basketball teams (1st ed.). New York: Villard. p. 37. ISBN 978-0-679-44887-7.
  7. ^ "SPORTS PEOPLE; UConn Search Begins". The New York Times. January 23, 1987. p. A18. Archived from the original on March 18, 2010. Retrieved March 17, 2010.
  8. ^ Shea, Jim (1995). Huskymania: The inside story of the rise of UConn's men's and women's basketball teams (1st ed.). New York: Villard. pp. 38–39. ISBN 978-0-679-44887-7.
  9. ^ Shea, Jim (1995). Huskymania: The inside story of the rise of UConn's men's and women's basketball teams (1st ed.). New York: Villard. p. 38. ISBN 978-0-679-44887-7.
  10. ^ "One On One: John Toner". The Pittsburgh Press. E. W. Scripps Company. May 13, 1985. p. D2. Archived from the original on January 24, 2013. Retrieved March 17, 2010.
  11. ^ "John Toner To Be Inducted Into "Huskies Of Honor"". www.uconnhuskies.com. University of Connecticut. February 23, 2000. Archived from the original on February 7, 2010. Retrieved February 7, 2010.
1966 Connecticut Huskies football team

The 1966 Connecticut Huskies football team represented the University of Connecticut in the 1966 NCAA College Division football season. The Huskies were led by first year head coach John Toner, and completed the season with a record of 2–6–1.

1967 Connecticut Huskies football team

The 1967 Connecticut Huskies football team represented the University of Connecticut in the 1967 NCAA College Division football season. The Huskies were led by second year head coach John Toner, and completed the season with a record of 5–4.

1968 Connecticut Huskies football team

The 1968 Connecticut Huskies football team represented the University of Connecticut in the 1968 NCAA College Division football season. The Huskies were led by third-year head coach John Toner, and completed the season with a record of 4–6.

1969 Connecticut Huskies football team

The 1969 Connecticut Huskies football team represented the University of Connecticut in the 1969 NCAA College Division football season. The Huskies were led by fourth year head coach John Toner, and completed the season with a record of 5–4.

1970 Connecticut Huskies football team

The 1970 Connecticut Huskies football team represented the University of Connecticut in the 1970 NCAA College Division football season. The Huskies were led by fifth-year head coach John Toner, and completed the season with a record of 4–4–1.

2006–07 Welsh Premier League

The 2006–07 Welsh Premier League was the 15th season of the Welsh Premier League since its establishment as the League of Wales in 1992. The league was won for the third consecutive season by The New Saints, their fourth title overall.

Andrew McDonald (bishop)

Andrew Thomas McDonald, O.S.B., (12 February 1871 – 22 May 1950) was a Roman Catholic clergyman who served as the Archbishop of the Archdiocese of St. Andrews and Edinburgh, United Kingdom.

Born in Fort William on 12 February 1871, he was ordained a priest of Order of Saint Benedict on 9 August 1896. He was appointed the Archbishop of St. Andrews and Edinburgh on 19 July 1929 and consecrated to the Episcopate on 24 September 1929. The principal consecrator was Archbishop Donald Mackintosh, and the principal co-consecrators were Bishop James William McCarthy and Bishop John Toner. He died in office on 22 May 1950, aged 79.

Donald Martin (bishop)

Donald Martin (1873–1938) was a Scottish Roman Catholic clergyman who served as the Bishop of Argyll and the Isles from 1919 to 1938.Born in Salen on the Ardnamurchan peninsula, Scotland on 6 October 1873, he was ordained to the priesthood on 23 September 1905. He was appointed the Bishop of the Diocese of Argyll and the Isles by the Holy See on 2 April 1919, and consecrated to the Episcopate on 11 June 1919. The principal consecrator was John Toner, Bishop of Dunkeld, and the principal co-consecrators were James William McCarthy, Bishop of Galloway and Henry Gray Graham, Auxiliary Bishop of St Andrews and Edinburgh.He died in office on 6 December 1938, aged 65.

George Bennett (bishop)

George Henry Bennett (1875–1946) was a Roman Catholic clergyman who served as the Bishop of Aberdeen from 1918 to 1946.Born in St. John's on the island of Antigua in the Caribbean Sea on 24 June 1875, he was ordained a priest on 9 April 1898. He was appointed the Bishop of the Diocese of Aberdeen by the Holy See on 18 June 1918, and consecrated to the Episcopate on 1 August 1918. The principal consecrator was Archbishop John Aloysius Maguire of Glasgow, and the principal co-consecrators were Bishop John Toner of Dunkeld and Bishop James William McCarthy of Galloway.He died in office on 25 December 1946, aged 71.

J. Orlean Christian

Joseph Orlean Christian (May 10, 1898 – October 21, 1979) was an American football, basketball, and baseball coach and college athletics administrator. He served as the head football coach at the University of Connecticut from 1934 to 1949 and as the head baseball coach there from 1936 to 1961. Christian was also the school's athletic director from 1950 to 1966 and filled in as interim head basketball coach during the 1935–36 season. He served as the first commissioner of the Yankee Conference, from 1966 to 1971. Christian died on October 21, 1979 at the age of 81 in a convalescent home in Willimantic, Connecticut. The University of Connecticut's home baseball field, J. O. Christian Field, is named in his honor. Christian's 66 wins as head football coach at Connecticut were the most in program history until Randy Edsall surpassed him in 2010.

James Bruce (bishop)

James Bruce (La: Jacobus de Brois) (died 1447) was a 15th-century cleric who was bishop of Dunkeld, Chancellor of Scotland, and bishop of Glasgow.

James Scanlan

James Donald Scanlan (24 January 1899 – 25 March 1976) was a Roman Catholic prelate who served first as the Bishop of Dunkeld, then Bishop of Motherwell, and ultimately Archbishop of Glasgow.

John Toner (bishop)

John Toner (1857–1949) was a Scottish Roman Catholic clergyman who served as the Bishop of Dunkeld from 1914 to 1949.Born in Glasgow, Scotland on 14 March 1857, he was ordained to the priesthood on 25 March 1882. He was appointed Bishop of the Diocese of Dunkeld by the Holy See on 8 September 1914, and consecrated to the Episcopate on 15 October 1914. The principal consecrator was James August Smith, Archbishop of St Andrews and Edinburgh and the principal co-consecrators were Donald Aloysius Mackintosh, Coadjutor Archbishop of Glasgow and James William McCarthy, Bishop of Galloway.He died in office on 31 May 1949, aged 92.

List of Connecticut Huskies head football coaches

The Connecticut Huskies (UConn) football team has represented the University of Connecticut in National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) football since the team's founding in 1896. The program has had 30 head coaches, including one interim coach and an early period where the team had no head coach. As of the 2017 season the current coach is Randy Edsall, the head coach from 1999 through the 2010 season who was re-hired following the 2016 season after an absence of six years.The nickname "Huskies" was adopted following a student poll in The Connecticut Campus in 1934 after the school's name changed from Connecticut Agricultural College to Connecticut State College in 1933; before then, the teams were referred to as the Aggies. Although the school's abbreviated nickname "UConn" and the Canadian Yukon territory—where huskies are commonly used in dogsledding—are homophones, the "Huskies" nickname predates the school's 1939 name change to the University of Connecticut. The first recorded use of "UConn" (as "U-Conn", both separately and with "Huskies") was later in 1939.The Huskies have played 1,083 games during the program's 118 seasons through 2016. UConn joined the fledgling Yankee Conference in 1947, which merged with and became the Atlantic 10 football conference in 1997. Seven coaches—J. Orlean Christian, Robert Ingalls, John Toner, Robert Casciola, Larry Naviaux, Walt Nadzak, and Tom Jackson—led Connecticut to conference championships prior to the team's transition from Division I-AA to Division I-A in 2000, and one coach—Skip Holtz—led UConn to the Division I-AA playoffs in 1998. Following the transition, Edsall led the Huskies to Big East Conference championships in 2007 and 2010.

Edsall is Connecticut's all-time leader in games coached (144), coaching wins (74), bowl game appearances (5), and bowl game wins (3).[General] Bob Diaco is the only other UConn head coach to lead the team to a bowl game, which was lost. Dave Warner, who led the then-Aggies to a 3–0 record in his only season coached in 1914, is the all-time leader in winning percentage (1.000); E. S. Mansfield and Leo Hafford, who both lost every game they coached in 1898 and 1911, respectively, share the lowest-ever winning percentage (.000). Among coaches that led the team for longer than a single season, T. D. Knowles is the all-time leader in winning percentage (.712), while John F. Donahue has the all-time lowest winning percentage (.125).

Robert Casciola

Robert F. Casciola (born c. 1935) is an American former college football coach, National Basketball Association executive, banking executive, and broadcaster. He was the head coach at the University of Connecticut from 1971 to 1972 and at Princeton University from 1973 to 1977. He held assistant coaching positions at Princeton, Dartmouth College. Casciola served as an executive vice president and the chief operating officer for the New Jersey Nets of the NBA from 1987 to 1991. He joined the National Football Foundation & College Hall of Fame in 1991 as executive director. He became president in 1996, serving in the role until his retirement in 2005. He played college football at Princeton as a tackle.

Robert Fraser (bishop)

Robert Fraser (10 August 1858 – 28 March 1914) was a Scottish Roman Catholic bishop who served as the Bishop of Dunkeld from 1913 to 1914.Born in Kennethmont, Aberdeenshire, Scotland on 10 August 1858, he was ordained to the priesthood on 13 August 1882. He was appointed the Bishop of the Diocese of Dunkeld by the Holy See on 14 May 1913, and consecrated to the Episcopate on 25 May 1913. The principal consecrator was Cardinal Rafael Merry del Val y Zulueta, and the principal co-consecrators were Archbishop Thomas Francis Kennedy, Rector of the Pontifical North American College and Donald Aloysius Mackintosh,

Coadjutor Archbishop of Glasgow.He died in office on 28 March 1914, aged 55.

Roy J. Guyer

Roy Jones Guyer (October 25, 1885 – April 3, 1956) was an American college football player and college football, basketball, baseball, and soccer coach. He served as the head football coach at Lebanon Valley College from 1908 to 1910 and again from 1913 to 1917 and at the University of Connecticut in 1919. Guyer died on April 3, 1956, at his home in Storrs, Connecticut.

Toner (surname)

Toner is a surname in English and Turkish. In English, it is an anglicisation of the Gaelic name Ó Tomhrair, meaning a "descendant of Tomhrar". Notable people with the surname include:

Cole Toner (born 1994), American football player

Devin Toner (born 1986), Irish rugby player

Imogen Toner (born 1983), British actress and artist

James J. Toner (born 1940), American racehorse trainer

John Toner (1923–2014), American football coach

Mehmet Toner (born 1958), Turkish biomedical engineer

Michael E. Toner (born 1964), American lawyer

Michael Toner (journalist) (born 1944), British journalist

Niall Toner (born 1944), Irish musician and radio broadcaster

Pauline Toner (1935–1989), Australian politician

Robin Toner (1954–2008), American journalist

Tom Toner (1950–1990), American football player

William Mellon

William Henry Mellon (1877–1952) was a Scottish Roman Catholic clergyman who served as the Bishop of Galloway from 1943 to 1952.Born in Edinburgh, Scotland on 6 January 1877, he was ordained to the priesthood on 29 March 1902. He was appointed Coadjutor Bishop of Galloway and Titular Bishop of Daulia by the Holy See on 21 August 1935. He was consecrated to the Episcopate on 28 October 1935. The principal consecrator was Archbishop Andrew Thomas McDonald of St Andrews and Edinburgh, and the principal co-consecrators were Bishop John Toner of Dunkeld and Bishop George Henry Bennett of Aberdeen.On the death of Bishop James William McCarthy on 24 December 1943, he automatically succeeded as Bishop of the Diocese of Galloway.He died in office on 2 February 1952, aged 75.

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