John Rowser

John Felix Rowser (born April 24, 1944) was an American football player, a defensive back in the National Football League for ten seasons with the Green Bay Packers, Pittsburgh Steelers, and Denver Broncos.

In his rookie season, he was a member of the Packers' Super Bowl II championship team, Vince Lombardi's last title. He played college football at the University of Michigan as a cornerback and halfback, from 1963 to 1966.

John Rowser
Position:Defensive back
Personal information
Born:April 24, 1944 (age 74)
Birmingham, Alabama
Height:6 ft 1 in (1.85 m)
Weight:190 lb (86 kg)
Career information
High school:Detroit (MI) Eastern
College:Michigan
NFL Draft:1967 / Round: 3 / Pick: 78
Career history
Career highlights and awards
Career NFL statistics
Games played:127
Games started:79
Interceptions:26
Player stats at NFL.com
Player stats at PFR

Early years

Born in Birmingham, Alabama,[1] Rowser attended Eastern High School in Detroit, Michigan.[2][3]

College career

Rowser enrolled at the University of Michigan in 1962 and played college football for head coach Bump Elliott from 1963 to 1966.[2] As a senior, he started all 10 games at cornerback and three games at left halfback for the 1966 Michigan Wolverines football team that compiled a 6–4 record, outscored opponents 236–138, and finished in third place in the Big Ten Conference.[4] Used principally on defense, he gained only 82 yards on 24 carries (3.4 yards per carry) as an offensive player.[5]

Professional career

Rowser was selected by the Green Bay Packers in the third round (78th overall pick) of the 1967 NFL/AFL draft.[1] He signed with the Packers in March 1967,[6] and appeared in 42 regular season games for the Packers from 1967 through 1969 including the Super Bowl II victory over the Oakland Raiders in his rookie season.[1]

In March 1970, the Packers traded Rowser to Pittsburgh Steelers in exchange for tight end John Hilton.[7] Rowser played for the Steelers for four years from 1970 to 1973, appearing in 47 games, including 42 as the team's starting left cornerback.[1]

In 1974, Rowser joined the Denver Broncos. He remained with the Broncos for three seasons from 1974 to 1976, appearing in 38 games, including 37 games as a starter at the left cornerback (1974) and free safety (1975–1976) positions.[1] Rowser cleared waivers and was released by the Broncos in June 1977.[8]

During his decade in the NFL, Rowser appeared in 127 games, 79 as a starter, and intercepted 26 passes for 444 return yards and four touchdowns. He also recovered six fumbles.[1] He missed, by one year, the Steelers' and Broncos' Super Bowl appearances.

References

  1. ^ a b c d e f "John Rowser". Pro-Football-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved March 25, 2015.
  2. ^ a b "All-Time Football Roster Database". University of Michigan, Bentley Historical Library. Retrieved March 26, 2015.
  3. ^ "Frenchy Rambles With Words, Too". The Pittsburgh Press. November 21, 1971. p. 35.
  4. ^ "1966 Football Team". University of Michigan, Bentley Historical Library. Retrieved March 25, 2015.
  5. ^ "Michigan Football Statistic Archive Query Page". University of Michigan. Archived from the original on November 12, 2007. Retrieved March 23, 2015.
  6. ^ "Green Bay signs John Rowser". Toledo Blade. Ohio. Associated Press. March 31, 1967. p. 31.
  7. ^ "Packers Trade John Rowser". The Spokesman-Review (AP story). March 1, 1970. p. 2.
  8. ^ "Broncos drop Lyon, Rowser". Southeast Missourian (AP story). June 7, 1977. p. 12.

External links

1963 Michigan Wolverines football team

The 1963 Michigan Wolverines football team represented the University of Michigan in the 1963 Big Ten Conference football season. In its fifth year under head coach Bump Elliott, Michigan compiled a 3–4–2 record (2–3–2 against conference opponents), tied for fifth place in the Big Ten, and outscored opponents by a combined total of 131 to 127.The highlight of the season was an upset victory over No. 2 Illinois led by Dick Butkus; the game was the only loss suffered by the 1963 Illinois team.Left guard Joe O'Donnell was the team captain and was selected by the Associated Press as a first-team guard on the 1963 All-Big Ten Conference football team. Left tackle Tom Keating received the team's most valuable player award and was selected as a first-team All-Big Ten player by the United Press International.The team's statistical leaders included Bob Timberlake with 593 passing yards, Mel Anthony with 394 rushing yards and 30 points scored, and John Henderson with 330 receiving yards.

1964 Michigan Wolverines football team

The 1964 Michigan Wolverines football team represented the University of Michigan in the 1964 Big Ten Conference football season. In its sixth year under head coach Bump Elliott, Michigan compiled a 9–1 record, won the Big Ten Conference championship for the first time since 1950, and defeated Oregon State in the 1965 Rose Bowl by a score of 34–7. The 1964 Wolverines defeated four teams ranked in the Top 10 in the AP Poll by a combined score of 82 to 17 and finished the regular season ranked No. 4 in both the AP and Coaches' polls. Although no post-bowl polls were taken in the 1964 season, Oregon State coach Tommy Prothro opined after watching game film from the Rose Bowl that the 1964 Wolverines were "the greatest football team he has ever seen."On offense, Michigan scored 235 points, an average of 23.5 points per game, and averaged 349 yards of total offense per game. The offense was led by quarterback Bob Timberlake who was selected as a first-team All-American. Timberlake was a triple threat who rushed for 631 yards, passed for 884 yards, and also handled field goals and extra points. The 1964 team had a strong running game with Mel Anthony and Carl Ward in the backfield. Totaling 2,473 rushing yards for the season, the Wolverines had four games (Air Force, Minnesota, Northwestern, and Oregon State) in which they rushed for over 300 yards.On defense, Michigan had three shutouts (a feat not accomplished by a Michigan team since 1948) and gave up only 83 points, an average of 8.3 points per game. Team leaders on defense included All-American defensive tackle Bill Yearby, All-Big Ten linebacker Tom Cecchini, and team captain and All-Big Ten player Jim Conley. The 1964 team also included at least 16 players who went on to play professional football, including offensive guard Tom Mack (13 years in the NFL, 11 Pro Bowl appearances), defensive back Rick Volk (12 years in the NFL, three Pro Bowl appearances), linebacker Frank Nunley (10 years in the NFL), linebacker Bill Laskey (10 years in the AFL/NFL), and defensive back John Rowser (10 years in the NFL).

The Wolverines narrowly missed an undefeated season, with their only loss coming against a Purdue team led by Bob Griese by a score of 21–20. Michigan had a chance to tie the game in the fourth quarter, but Timberlake carried the ball for an attempted two-point conversion and was stopped short of the goal line.

1966 All-Big Ten Conference football team

The 1966 All-Big Ten Conference football team consists of American football players chosen by various organizations for All-Big Ten Conference teams for the 1966 Big Ten Conference football season. Players from the 1966 Michigan State Spartans football team dominated the All-Big Ten team in 1966, taking eight of the 22 first-team spots. Players from Purdue and Michigan each received four spots.

1966 Big Ten Conference football season

The 1966 Big Ten Conference football season was the 71st season of college football played by the member schools of the Big Ten Conference and was a part of the 1966 NCAA University Division football season.

The 1966 Michigan State Spartans football team, under head coach Duffy Daugherty, won the Big Ten football championship, compiled a 9–0–1 record, and was ranked No. 2 in the final AP Poll. Four Spartans' players were among the first eight selections in the 1967 NFL/AFL Draft: defensive tackle Bubba Smith (first); running back Clinton Jones (second); linebacker George Webster (fifth); and flanker Gene Washington (eighth).

The 1966 Purdue Boilermakers football team, under head coach Jack Mollenkopf, finished in second place with a 9–2 record and was ranked No. 7 in the final AP Poll. The Boilermakers received the conference's berth to play in the 1967 Rose Bowl because of the Big Ten's "no-repeat" rule and defeated USC, 14–13. Purdue quarterback Bob Griese led the conference in passing yards and total yards and won the Chicago Tribune Silver Football as the Big Ten's most valuable player and the Sammy Baugh Trophy as the nation's top collegiate passer. Griese also finished second behind Steve Spurrier in the voting for the 1966 Heisman Trophy.

1966 Michigan Wolverines football team

The 1966 Michigan Wolverines football team represented the University of Michigan in the 1966 Big Ten Conference football season. In its eighth year under head coach Bump Elliott, Michigan compiled a 6–4 record (4–3 against conference opponents), tied for third place in the Big Ten, and outscored opponents by a combined total of 236 to 138.

After opening the season with non-conference victories over Oregon State and California, Michigan lost three consecutive games, including losses to No. 1 Michigan State and No. 9 Purdue. The team then won four of its final five games, including a 17–3 victory over rival Ohio State.

Right end Jack Clancy was the team captain and the recipient of the team's most valuable player award. He set a school record and led the Big Ten with 1,077 receiving yards and received both All-American and All-Big Ten honors.

The team's other statistical leaders included quarterback Dick Vidmer with 1,609 passing yards, Dave Fisher with 672 rushing yards, and Jim Detwiler with 60 points scored. Detwiler's 60 points led the Big Ten, and Vidmer's passing yards ranked second behind Bob Griese of Purdue.

1967 Green Bay Packers season

The 1967 Green Bay Packers season was their 49th season overall and their 47th season in the National Football League and resulted in a 9–4–1 record and a victory in Super Bowl II. The team beat the Dallas Cowboys in the NFL Championship Game, a game commonly known as the "Ice Bowl," which marked the second time the Packers had won an NFL-record third consecutive NFL championship, having also done so in 1931 under team founder Curly Lambeau. In the playoff era (since 1933), it remains the only time a team has won three consecutive NFL titles.

The Packers were led by ninth-year head coach Vince Lombardi and veteran quarterback Bart Starr, in his twelfth season. Green Bay's victory in Super Bowl II over the Oakland Raiders was the fifth world championship for the Packers under Lombardi and the last game he coached for the Packers.

1967 NFL/AFL Draft

The 1967 National Football League draft was conducted March 14–15, 1967, at the Gotham Hotel in New York City. It was the first common draft with the AFL, part of the AFL–NFL merger agreement of June 1966.

This draft was delayed as new guidelines were established; redshirt (or "future") players were no longer eligible. It began on a Tuesday in mid-March; the previous two years the leagues held their separate drafts on the final Saturday of November, immediately following the college football regular season.

1968 Green Bay Packers season

The 1968 Green Bay Packers season was their 50th season overall and the 48th season in the National Football League. The club posted a 6–7–1 record under first-year head coach Phil Bengston, earning them a third-place finish in the Central Division of the Western Conference. It was also the Packers' first losing season since 1958.

1969 Green Bay Packers season

The 1969 Green Bay Packers season was their 51st season overall and their 49th season in the National Football League. The club posted an 8–6 record under coach Phil Bengtson, earning them a 3rd-place finish in the Central division.

1970 Pittsburgh Steelers season

The 1970 Pittsburgh Steelers season was the franchise's 38th in the National Football League. They improved from a league-worst 1–13 record the previous year, finishing with a 5–9 record and third place in the newly formed AFC Central. The Steelers began the decade in a new conference and a new stadium with a new quarterback. After nearly 40 years in the NFL they shifted to the AFC, to complete the merger between the NFL and AFL. It was the NFL's weakest division that season, as the Steelers finished three games behind the division-winning Cincinnati Bengals—a team that was only in its third year of existence that season.

1971 Pittsburgh Steelers season

The 1971 Pittsburgh Steelers season was the team's 39th in the National Football League. The Steelers showed improvement finishing in second Place with a 6-8 record. But Terry Bradshaw struggled with turnovers in his second season throwing 22 interceptions to 13 touchdown passes. The Steelers that year drafted wide receiver Frank Lewis, Hall of Fame linebacker Jack Ham, guard Gerry Mullins, defensive end Dwight White, tight end/tackle Larry Brown, defensive tackle Ernie Holmes, and safety Mike Wagner, all key contributors during the Steelers Super Bowl teams of the 1970s.

1972 Pittsburgh Steelers season

The 1972 Pittsburgh Steelers season was the team's 40th in the National Football League.

The team posted a record of 11–3 in 1972, and won their first-ever AFC Central Division title. It was the team's third-ever postseason appearance, its first postseason appearance in ten seasons (the Playoff Bowl for third place in the league), and only its second playoff game since 1947. This season is famous for the Immaculate Reception, where the Steelers beat the Oakland Raiders in the playoffs 13-7 on a last second touchdown by Franco Harris.

The rebuilding of the franchise that began in 1969 with the hiring of Chuck Noll finally came to fruition in his fourth year. After winning only one game in his first year in 1969 the team that showed steady improvement broke through in 1972 and made the playoffs for the first time since 1947. The division title was the first in team history, as was the appearance in the AFC Championship game which they lost to the undefeated Miami Dolphins 21-17. It was the first of 8 straight playoff appearances for the Steelers that led to 4 Super Bowl Championships.

1973 Pittsburgh Steelers season

The 1973 Pittsburgh Steelers season was the team's 41st season in the National Football League. The team finished second in the AFC Central division, but qualified for the postseason for the second consecutive season. The Steelers got off to a terrific start winning eight of their first nine games. However, a costly three game losing streak would put their playoff hopes in jeopardy. The Steelers would recover to win their last two games, but had to settle for a Wild Card berth with a 10-4 record. The Steelers would lose in the playoffs to the Oakland Raiders 33-14 in Oakland.

The 1973 Steelers' pass defense is arguably the greatest in the history of the NFL. Their defensive passer rating—the quarterback passer rating of all opposing quarterbacks throughout the season—was 33.1, an NFL record for the Super Bowl era.

According to Cold Hard Football Facts:

Pittsburgh's pass-defense numbers that year were stunning. Opposing passers compiled the following stat-line:

164 of 359 (45.7%) for 1,923 yards, 5.36 [yards-per-attempt], 11 [touchdowns] and 37 [interceptions]The figure that leaps screaming off the sheet is the amazing 37 picks in 14 games. The 2009 Jets, by comparison, allowed a puny 8 TDs in 16 games, but hauled in just 17 picks.

Pittsburgh's all-time best pass defense was an equal-opportunity unit: Mike Wagner led the team with 8 INT, but 10 other guys recorded at least one pick. Amazing. Eleven defenders boasted at least one INT for Pittsburgh that season. The entire starting secondary recorded 24 picks alone, and Hall of Fame cornerback Mel Blount was last on the list: Wagner (8), safety Glen Edwards (6), cornerback John Rowser (6) and Blount (4).

1974 Denver Broncos season

The 1974 Denver Broncos season was the team's 15th year in professional football and its fifth with the National Football League (NFL). The team finished the season with a winning record for the second straight season with seven wins, six losses, and one tie.

1975 Denver Broncos season

The 1975 Denver Broncos season was the team's 16th year in professional football and its sixth with the National Football League (NFL). The team finished the season with a losing record and did not make the playoffs with six wins and eight losses. The Broncos would start out winning their first 2 games of the season against the Chiefs and Packers. However, the Broncos would struggle the rest of the season, as they would only go 4-8 in their last 12 games.

Jim Detwiler

James R. Detwiler (born May 29, 1945) is a former American football halfback who was the 20th pick in the first round of the 1967 NFL Draft. Before this he had been an All-Big Ten Conference player for the Michigan Wolverines from 1964 to 1966.

List of Michigan Wolverines in the NFL draft

This is a list of Michigan Wolverines football players in the NFL Draft.

Parnell Dickinson

Parnell Dickinson (born March 14, 1953) is a former American football quarterback who played in the National Football League (NFL) for one season. Over the course of his career, he played in eight games for the Tampa Bay Buccaneers, completed 15 of 39 passes for 210 yards, threw one touchdown and five interceptions, and finished his career with a passer rating of 25.5.

A four-year starting quarterback at Mississippi Valley State University, Dickinson was drafted by the Buccaneers in the seventh round of the 1976 NFL Draft. He served as the backup quarterback behind Steve Spurrier his rookie season, and saw playing time in eight games, including one start against the Miami Dolphins. His season ended after suffering an injury in a game against the Cleveland Browns. He recovered from the injury and tried to make the team in 1977, but was cut, ending his career. After retiring, he became a high school offensive coordinator in Tampa.

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