John R. Wooden Award

The John R. Wooden Award is an award given annually to the most outstanding men's and women's college basketball players. The program consists of the men's and women's Player of the Year awards, the Legends of Coaching award and recognizes the All–America Teams.

The awards, given by the Los Angeles Athletic Club, are named in honor of John Wooden, the 1932 national collegiate basketball player of the year from Purdue. Wooden later taught and coached men's basketball at Indiana State and UCLA. Coach Wooden, whose teams at UCLA won ten NCAA championships, was the first man to be inducted into the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame as a player and coach. His 1948 Indiana State team was the NAIB (now NAIA) National Finalist.

The award, which was originally given only to male athletes, was first given in 1977. Starting in 2004, the award was extended to women's basketball. Additionally, the Legends of Coaching Award was presented first in 1999. The 2015 presentation was broadcast on ESPN2 and the show was presented by Wendy's at Los Angeles' Club Nokia on Friday, April 10, 2015.

John R. Wooden Award
Johnwooden
Given forthe most outstanding men's and women's college basketball players
CountryUnited States
Presented byLos Angeles Athletic Club
History
First award1977
Most recentZion Williamson, Duke (men's)
Sabrina Ionescu, Oregon (women's)
WebsiteOfficial site

Selection process

Men's award

Each year, the Award's National Advisory Board, a 26-member panel, selects approximately 20 candidates for Player of the Year and All-American Team honors. The candidates must be full-time students and have a cumulative grade point average of 2.00 or higher throughout their college career. Players who are nominated must have made outstanding contributions to team play, both offensively and defensively, and be model citizens, exhibiting strength of character both on and off the court.

The selection ballot is announced prior to the NCAA basketball tournament. The voters consist of 1,000 sportswriters and sportscasters representing the 50 states.

The top ten vote-getters are selected to the All-American Team, and the results are announced following the Elite Eight round of the NCAA Tournament. The person who receives the most votes is named the Player of the Year, and the winner is announced following the NCAA championship game.

The Player of the Year is awarded a trophy consisting of five bronze figures. The player's school receives a duplicate trophy, as well as a scholarship grant. The other top four members of the All-American Team receive an All-American Team trophy, a jacket, and a scholarship grant which goes to their school. Each coach of the top five All-American Team members also receives a jacket. The All-American Team members ranked six through ten receive an All-American Team trophy and a jacket, but their schools do not receive a scholarship.

Women's award

The criteria for the women's Player of the Year award and All-American Team honors are similar to those for the men. For the women's award, the National Advisory Board consists of 12 members, and approximately 15 candidates are selected for the ballot. The voters are 250 sportswriters and sportscasters.

In contrast to the men's All-American Team, only five members are selected for the women's team. The Player of the Year receives a trophy, and her school receives a duplicate trophy and a scholarship grant.

The trophy

The trophy features five bronze figures, each depicting one of the five major skills that Wooden believed that "total" basketball player must exhibit: rebounding, passing, shooting, dribbling, and defense.

The concept for the trophy originated with Wooden Award Chairman, Richard "Duke" Llewellyn. Work began on the trophy in 1975, and sculptor Don Winton, who had sculpted many top sports awards, was given the task of designing the model of the trophy.

The figures are bronze plated and attached to a pentagonal base plate. The tallest figure is 10¼ inches high (26 cm). The trophy's base is 7½ inches high (19 cm), and is made from solid walnut. The total height of the trophy is 17 34 inches (45 cm), and it weighs 25 lb (11 kg).

Wooden Award winners

Men
Season Player School Position Class
1976–77 Marques Johnson UCLA Forward Senior
1977–78 Phil Ford North Carolina Point guard Senior
1978–79 Larry Bird Indiana State Small forward Senior
1979–80 Darrell Griffith Louisville Shooting guard Senior
1980–81 Danny Ainge BYU Shooting guard Senior
1981–82 Ralph Sampson[1] Virginia Center Junior
1982–83 Ralph Sampson (2)[1] Virginia (2) Center Senior
1983–84 Michael Jordan North Carolina (2) Shooting guard Junior
1984–85 Chris Mullin St. John's Small forward / Shooting guard Senior
1985–86 Walter Berry St. John's (2) Power forward Senior
1986–87 David Robinson Navy Center Senior
1987–88 Danny Manning Kansas Power forward Senior
1988–89 Sean Elliott Arizona Small forward Senior
1989–90 Lionel Simmons La Salle Small forward Senior
1990–91 Larry Johnson[2] UNLV Power forward Senior
1991–92 Christian Laettner[3] Duke Forward Senior
1992–93 Calbert Cheaney[4] Indiana Small forward Senior
1993–94 Glenn Robinson[5] Purdue Small forward / Power forward Sophomore
1994–95 Ed O'Bannon[6] UCLA (2) Small forward Senior
1995–96 Marcus Camby[7] UMass Center Junior
1996–97 Tim Duncan [8] Wake Forest Center Senior
1997–98 Antawn Jamison[9] North Carolina (3) Power forward Junior
1998–99 Elton Brand[10] Duke (2) Center Sophomore
1999–00 Kenyon Martin[11] Cincinnati Power forward Senior
2000–01 Shane Battier[12] Duke (3) Small forward / Power forward Senior
2001–02 Jason Williams[13] Duke (4) Point guard Junior
2002–03 T. J. Ford[14] Texas Point guard Sophomore
2003–04 Jameer Nelson[15] Saint Joseph's Point guard Senior
2004–05 Andrew Bogut Utah Center Sophomore
2005–06 J. J. Redick[16] Duke (5) Shooting guard Senior
2006–07 Kevin Durant[17] Texas (2) Small forward Freshman
2007–08 Tyler Hansbrough[18] North Carolina (4) Power forward Junior
2008–09 Blake Griffin[19] Oklahoma Power forward Sophomore
2009–10 Evan Turner[20] Ohio State Small forward Junior
2010–11 Jimmer Fredette[21] BYU (2) Point guard Senior
2011–12 Anthony Davis[22] Kentucky Center Freshman
2012–13 Trey Burke[23] Michigan Point guard Sophomore
2013–14 Doug McDermott[24] Creighton Small forward / Power forward Senior
2014–15 Frank Kaminsky[25] Wisconsin Power forward Senior
2015–16 Buddy Hield[26] Oklahoma (2) Shooting guard Senior
2016–17 Frank Mason III[27] Kansas (2) Point guard Senior
2017–18 Jalen Brunson Villanova Point guard Junior
2018–19 Zion Williamson[28] Duke (6) Small forward / Power forward Freshman
Women
Season Player School Position Class
2003–04 Alana Beard[29] Duke Guard Senior
2004–05 Seimone Augustus[1] LSU Guard Junior
2005–06 Seimone Augustus (2)[1] LSU Guard Senior
2006–07 Candace Parker[17] Tennessee Center Junior
2007–08 Candace Parker (2)[18] Tennessee Center Senior
2008–09 Maya Moore[19] Connecticut Forward Sophomore
2009–10 Tina Charles[20] Connecticut Center Senior
2010–11 Maya Moore (2)[21] Connecticut Forward Senior
2011–12 Brittney Griner[22] Baylor Center Junior
2012–13 Brittney Griner (2)[23] Baylor Center Senior
2013–14 Chiney Ogwumike[24] Stanford Forward Senior
2014–15 Breanna Stewart[25] Connecticut Forward Junior
2015–16 Breanna Stewart (2)[26] Connecticut Forward Senior
2016–17 Kelsey Plum[27] Washington Point guard Senior
2017–18 A'ja Wilson South Carolina Forward Senior
2018–19 Sabrina Ionescu[28] Oregon Guard Junior

Trademark dispute

The Wooden family announced in August 2005 that he would no longer participate because of a trademark dispute concerning the use of his name.[30][31] However, he never contested the use of his name prior to his death in 2010, and the award continues to bear his name. “I don’t want anything to interfere with the continuation of the award,” (Wooden) told The Associated Press at the time.[32] In 2011 the Wooden Family began participation. Coach John Wooden's son, Jim, presented the Wooden Award to Brigham Young senior Jimmer Fredette.[33] In 2012 John Wooden's grandson, Greg, on behalf of The Los Angeles Athletic Club, presented the Wooden Award to University of Kentucky freshman Anthony Davis. Greg Wooden made the announcement on ESPN College GameDay.[34]

High School Player of the Year Award

The John R. Wooden High School Player of the Year awards are given to the most valuable player in each of the five divisions of the California Interscholastic Federation Southern Section, and one Los Angeles City division.

Legends of Coaching Award

The Legends of Coaching Award recognizes the lifetime achievement of coaches who exemplify Coach Wooden's high standards of coaching success and personal achievement. When selecting the individual, the Wooden Award Committee considers a coach's character, success rate on the court, graduating rate of student athletes, his or her coaching philosophy, and identification with the goals of the John R. Wooden Award.

All listed honorees coached in the men's game unless otherwise noted.

John R. Wooden Legends of Coaching Award
Dean Smith's Legends of Coaching Award.
Pat-Summitt-Walter-Reed-Center-06-24-08-2
Pat Summitt was the first female coach selected.
Mike Montgomery at 2009 Coaches Tour in SJ 1
Mike Montgomery won the award while still at Stanford.
Jim Calhoun
Jim Calhoun of Connecticut received the award in 2005.
Season Coach School
1998–99 Dean Smith[35] North Carolina
1999–00 Mike Krzyzewski[36] Duke
2000–01 Lute Olson[37] Arizona
2001–02 Denny Crum[38] Louisville
2002–03 Roy Williams[39] Kansas
2003–04 Mike Montgomery[29] Stanford
2004–05 Jim Calhoun[40] Connecticut
2005–06 Jim Boeheim[41] Syracuse
2006–07 Gene Keady[42] Purdue
2007–08 Pat Summitt[43] Tennessee (women)
2008–09 Rick Barnes[44] Texas
2009–10 Billy Donovan[45] Florida
2010–11 Tom Izzo[46] Michigan State
2011–12 Geno Auriemma[47] Connecticut (women)
2012–13 Bill Self[48] Kansas
2013–14 Tara VanDerveer [49] Stanford (women)
2014–15 Steve Fisher[50] San Diego State
2015–16 Tubby Smith[51] Texas Tech
2016–17 Muffet McGraw[52] Notre Dame (women)
2017–18 Jay Wright[53] Villanova
2018–19 Lon Kruger[54] Oklahoma

See also

References

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  2. ^ Nadel, John (April 4, 1991). "UNLV's Larry Johnson Wins Wooden Award". Messenger-Inquirer. Owensboro, Kentucky. Associated Press. p. 12 – via Newspapers.com.
  3. ^ "Laettner Caps Awards Sweep With Wooden". Arizona Republic. Phoenix, Arizona. April 9, 1992. p. 58 – via Newspapers.com.
  4. ^ "Indiana's Cheaney Wins Wooden Award". Courier-Post. Camden, New Jersey. Associated Press. April 8, 1993. p. 52 – via Newspapers.com.
  5. ^ "Glenn Robinson wins Wooden Award". The Index-Journal. Greenwood, South Carolina. Associated Press. April 10, 1994. p. 35 – via Newspapers.com.
  6. ^ "Ed O'Bannon Wins Wooden Award". The Times. Shreveport, Louisiana. April 8, 1995. p. 21 – via Newspapers.com.
  7. ^ "Camby Wins Wooden Award". Rocky Mount Telegram. Rocky Mount, North Carolina. Associated Press. April 5, 1996. p. 9 – via Newspapers.com.
  8. ^ "Tim Duncan Wins Wooden Award". The Town Talk. Alexandria, Louisiana. April 5, 1997. p. 10 – via Newspapers.com.
  9. ^ "Antawn Jamison wins Wooden Award". Courier-Post. Camden, New Jersey. April 4, 1998. p. 38 – via Newspapers.com.
  10. ^ "Elton Brand wins Wooden Award". Battle Creek Enquirer. Battle Creek, Michigan. April 3, 1999. p. 9 – via Newspapers.com.
  11. ^ "Cincinnati's Kenyon Martin wins Wooden Award". The Newark Advocate. Newark, Ohio. April 8, 2000. p. 16 – via Newspapers.com.
  12. ^ "Shane Battier Wins Wooden Award". The Tribune. Coschocton, Ohio. Associated Press. April 7, 2001. p. 10 – via Newspapers.com.
  13. ^ Norwood, Robyn (April 8, 2002). "Wooden Award Goes to Williams". The Los Angeles Times. p. 7 – via Newspapers.com.
  14. ^ "Texas' T.J. Ford wins Wooden Award". Southern Illinoisan. Carbondale, Illinois. Associated Press. April 13, 2003. p. 21 – via Newspapers.com.
  15. ^ Harris, Beth (April 11, 2004). "Saint Joseph's Nelson wins Wooden Award". Longview News Journal. Longview, Texas. Associated Press. p. 29.
  16. ^ Nadel, John (April 9, 2006). "Duke's Redick completes sweep with Wooden Award". The Odessa American. Associated Press. p. 28 – via Newspapers.com.
  17. ^ a b "Basketball". Tampa Bay Times. st. Petersburg, Florida. April 8, 2007. p. 37 – via Newspapers.com.
  18. ^ a b Pucin, Diane (April 12, 2008). "Hanbrough, Parker win Wooden Awards". The Los Angeles Times. p. 49 – via Newspapers.com.
  19. ^ a b Altavilla, John (April 11, 2009). "Moore Adds Wooden to Haul". Hartford Courant. p. B03 – via Newspapers.com.
  20. ^ a b "Ohio State's Turner, UConn's Charles win Wooden Awards". Lansing State Journal. April 10, 2010. p. 15 – via Newspapers.com.
  21. ^ a b Altavilla, John (April 9, 2011). "Maya Moore Wins Second Wooden Award". Hartford Courant. p. C01 – via Newspapers.com.
  22. ^ a b Harris, Beth (April 7, 2012). "Davis, Griner grab Wooden Award in L.A." The Desert Sun. Palm Springs, California. Associated Press. p. 40 – via Newspapers.com.
  23. ^ a b "Griner, Burke to get Wooden Awards". Florida Today. Cocoa, Florida. April 13, 2013. p. C2 – via Newspapers.com.
  24. ^ a b "Creighton's McDermott Honored". The Greenwood Commonwealth. Greenwood, Mississippi. Associated Press. April 13, 2014. p. B006.
  25. ^ a b Harris, Beth (April 12, 2015). "Kaminsky, Stewart take Wooden honors". The Courier-Journal. p. C12 – via Newspapers.com.
  26. ^ a b Altavilla, John (April 9, 2016). "Stewart Wins Her Second Wooden Award". Hartford Courant. p. C7 – via Newspapers.com.
  27. ^ a b Harris, Beth (April 8, 2017). "Mason, Plum win Wooden Awards". Reno Gazette-Journal. Associated Press. p. C3 – via Newspapers.com.
  28. ^ a b "Winners Named for John R. Wooden Award During College Basketball Awards Presented by Wendy's on ESPN2" (Press release). Los Angeles Athletic Club. April 12, 2019. Retrieved April 12, 2019.
  29. ^ a b Norwood, Robyn (April 11, 2004). "The Best is Definitely Last for Busy Nelson". The Los Angeles Times. p. 56 – via Newspapers.com.
  30. ^ "Hansbrough wins Wooden Award". Sports.espn.go.com. Associated Press. April 12, 2008. Retrieved November 28, 2008.
  31. ^ "Wooden withdraws support for Wooden Award". Sports.espn.go.com. Associated Press. August 31, 2005. Retrieved November 28, 2008.
  32. ^ "Wooden withdraws support for Wooden Award – Club unhappy coach allowed his name on another award". Nbcsports.msnbc.com. August 27, 2005. Retrieved November 28, 2008.
  33. ^ "BYU'S JIMMER FREDETTE WINS 35th ANNUAL JOHN R. WOODEN AWARD".
  34. ^ "36th John R. Wooden Award Presented To Anthony Davis Of Kentucky".
  35. ^ "Krzyzewski to get high award". Battle Creek Enquirer. Battle Creek, Michigan. December 17, 1999. p. 14 – via Newspapers.com.
  36. ^ "Krzyzewski to Receive Wooden Award". St. Cloud Times. Saint Cloud, Minnesota. December 17, 1999. p. 34 – via Newspapers.com.
  37. ^ "Wake Forest Upsets Kansas; Tennessee Survives SMU". Hartford Courant. Hartford, Connecticut. Associated Press. December 8, 2000. p. 314 – via Newspapers.com.
  38. ^ "Coaching Legend Crum to Receive Wooden Award". Honolulu Star Bulletin. October 5, 2001. p. 16 – via Newspapers.com.
  39. ^ "Roy Williams to get Wooden Award". The Pantagraph. Bloomington, Illinois. October 11, 2002. p. 20 – via Newspapers.com.
  40. ^ "Wooden Award Finalists Named". Hartford Courant. March 30, 2005. p. C05 – via Newspapers.com.
  41. ^ Watkins, Eric (October 10, 2017). "Jay Wright Earns 2018 Wooden Award Legends of Coaching Honor". 247 Sports. Retrieved March 25, 2018.
  42. ^ Bolch, Ben; Pucin, Diane (October 13, 2006). "USC Freshman Vie for Point Guard Job". The Los Angeles Times. p. 49. Retrieved March 25, 2018 – via Newspapers.com.
  43. ^ "Major Career Achievements". Nashville Post. Retrieved March 25, 2018.
  44. ^ Rosner, Mark (October 15, 2009). "Ward shows great improvement, is 'shooting the ball with confidence'". Austin American-Statesman. p. 23 – via Newspapers.com.
  45. ^ "Florida's Donovan Wins Wooden Award". Florida Today. Cocoa, Florida. April 9, 2010. p. 26 – via Newspapers.com.
  46. ^ "A legendary night in LA". Lansing State Journal. Lansing. April 10, 2011. p. 35 – via Newspapers.com.
  47. ^ "Auriemma to receive Wooden award". CTPost. October 12, 2011. Retrieved March 25, 2018.
  48. ^ "Bill Self to receive the Wooden's Awards 'Legends of Coaching' honor in 2013". KU Sports. October 10, 2012. Retrieved March 24, 2018.
  49. ^ Pucin, Diane (November 12, 2013). "Two UCLA players make preseason Wooden Award list". Los Angeles Times. Retrieved March 24, 2018.
  50. ^ Ibarra, Kristian (October 3, 2014). "Fisher nets Legends coaching award". The Daily Aztec. Retrieved March 24, 2018.
  51. ^ "Texas Tech's Tubby Smith Named 2016 John R. Wooden Award "Legends of Coaching" Recipient". Texas Tech. October 13, 2015. Retrieved March 24, 2018.
  52. ^ "Muffet McGraw Named 2017 Wooden Legends of Coaching Award Recipient" (Press release). Atlantic Coast Conference. October 12, 2016. Retrieved April 8, 2017.
  53. ^ "Jay Wright of Villanova Named 2018 John R. Wooden Legends of Coaching Recipient" (Press release). Los Angeles Athletic Club. October 10, 2017. Retrieved October 12, 2017.
  54. ^ "Lon Kruger of Oklahoma Named 2019 John R. Wooden Legends of Coaching Recipient" (Press release). Los Angeles Athletic Club. October 9, 2018. Retrieved October 11, 2018.

External links

1996–97 Wake Forest Demon Deacons men's basketball team

The 1996–97 Wake Forest Demon Deacons men's basketball team represented Wake Forest University in the 1996–97 NCAA Division I men's basketball season.

2004 in basketball

The following are the basketball events of the year 2004 throughout the world.

2010–11 Providence Friars men's basketball team

The 2010–11 Providence Friars men's basketball team represented Providence College in the Big East Conference. The team finished with a 4–14 conference record and a 15–17 record overall.

In his third season with the team, head coach Keno Davis returned two starters and just eight players overall after a tumultuous offseason that included the dismissal of the team's leading scorer in 2009–10, forward Jamine Peterson, as well as the transfer or dismissal of three other players.

The Friars were led in scoring by senior forward Marshon Brooks, who finished first the conference and second in Division I with 24.6 points per game. He set conference records for single-game scoring (52 points vs. Notre Dame on February 23) and for single-season conference scoring (468 points). Brooks was named to the All-Big East First Team and the Associated Press All-American Third Team following the season and was a finalist for the 2011 John R. Wooden Award.

After losing their first six conference games, including a narrow home defeat to #5 Pittsburgh on January 4, the Friars managed back-to-back wins over ranked opponents for the first time since 1998. On January 22, they defeated #19 Louisville at home before knocking off #8 Villanova at home on January 26. However, the Friars did not receive votes in either the AP Poll or Coaches' Poll at any point in the season.

The Friars lost seven of their final eight regular season conference games, finishing 14th in the conference before falling to Marquette in the first round of the 2011 Big East Men's Basketball Tournament. Davis was fired three days later.

Atlantic 10 Conference Men's Basketball Player of the Year

The Atlantic 10 Conference Men's Basketball Player of the Year is a basketball award given to the Atlantic 10 Conference's (A–10) most outstanding player. The award was first given following the conference's inaugural 1976–77 season, when the conference was officially known as the Eastern Collegiate Basketball League but popularly known as the Eastern 8. David West of Xavier is the only player to have won the award three times (2001–03). Four other players—James Bailey, Earl Belcher, Greg Jones and Steven Smith—have won the award twice. Two players—Marcus Camby (1996) and Jameer Nelson (2004)—have also won the award in the same season that they were named the Naismith College Player of the Year or received the John R. Wooden Award, the nation's two most prestigious men's college basketball awards.

As of 2018, Temple has the most all-time winners with ten, but the Owls left for the American Athletic Conference in July 2013. Among schools remaining in the conference beyond 2013, Saint Joseph's and UMass have the most winners, with five each. There have been three ties in the award's history (1983, 2005, 2018). Four current member schools have had no winners—Dayton, Fordham, George Mason, and VCU. However, of these schools, only Dayton and Fordham were A-10 members before 2012.

Big East Conference Men's Basketball Player of the Year

The Big East Conference Men's Basketball Player of the Year award is given to the men's basketball player in the Big East Conference voted as the top performer by the conference coaches. It was first awarded at the end of the league's inaugural season of 1979–80.

The head coaches of the league's teams (currently 10) submit their votes following the end of the regular season and before the conference's tournament in early March. The coaches cannot vote for their own players.The award was introduced following the conference's first season in 1980, in which it was presented to John Duren of Georgetown. Patrick Ewing (Georgetown), Richard Hamilton (Connecticut), Troy Bell (Boston College), Troy Murphy (Notre Dame) and Kris Dunn (Providence) each won the award twice, and Chris Mullin (St. John's) won three consecutive times from 1983 through 1985. Three award winners have been inducted as players to the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame. Ewing, who shared the award in 1984 and 1985 with Mullin, was inducted in 2008 after playing 17 years in the National Basketball Association between 1985 and 2002. Mullin followed in 2011 after a 16-year NBA career (1985–2001). Most recently, Georgetown's 1992 Player of the Year Alonzo Mourning entered the Hall in 2014 following a 16-year NBA career (1992–2008). There have been seven ties; the most recent instance was that between Dunn and Ryan Arcidiacono of Villanova in 2015.Seven players have been awarded a major national player of the year award in the same year that they received a Big East Player of the Year award. In 1985, Ewing and Mullin shared the conference award, while Ewing was named Naismith College Player of the Year and Mullin was given the John R. Wooden Award. The following year, Walter Berry of St. John's received the Wooden Award and the Big East Player of the Year award. In 1996, Ray Allen of Connecticut received the conference award and was also the final recipient of the UPI Player of the Year Award. In 2004, Connecticut's Emeka Okafor won the conference award while sharing NABC Player of the Year honors with Jameer Nelson of Saint Joseph's. Creighton's Doug McDermott received all major national awards along with the conference award in 2014. Finally, Villanova's Jalen Brunson was the national player of the year as well in 2018. Georgetown has had the most winners, with eight. The only current Big East members without a winner are Butler and Xavier, both of which joined the conference at its relaunch following its 2013 split into two leagues, and DePaul, members since 2005.

Big East Conference Women's Basketball Player of the Year

The Big East Conference Women's Basketball Player of the Year award is given to the women's basketball player in the Big East Conference voted as the top performer by the conference coaches. It was first awarded at the end of the 1982–83 season, the first in which the Big East sponsored women's basketball.

The head coaches of the league's teams submit their votes following the end of the regular season and before the conference's tournament in early March. The coaches cannot vote for their own players.The first award went to Debbie Beckford of St. John's in 1983. There have been five multiple winners so far. Rebecca Lobo and Diana Taurasi, both of Connecticut, each won the award twice in their careers. Shelly Pennefather of Villanova and two UConn players, Kerry Bascom and Maya Moore, were each three-time winners. Uniquely, Moore's wins were not all consecutive, as she lost out to her UConn teammate Tina Charles in 2009–10.

So far, voting has resulted in a tie once, in 1984 when both Jennifer Bruce and Kathy Finn won the award.

Seven players have also won National Player of the Year awards. Rebecca Lobo, Ruth Riley, Sue Bird, Diana Taurasi, and Maya Moore are all recipients of the Naismith College Player of the Year award. Shelly Pennefather, Lobo, Jennifer Rizzotti, Bird, Taurasi, and Moore are all recipients of the Wade Trophy. Moore is also a recipient of the John R. Wooden Award.

Connecticut has the most all-time awards, with 17, and the most individual winners, with 11. The only current Big East members with more than one winner are Villanova, with two players who combined to win four awards, and DePaul, with three players who each won one award. Three current Big East members have yet to have a winner—Seton Hall, which was a charter member of the Big East in 1979, and Butler and Xavier, both of which joined the Big East at its 2013 relaunch following the conference split which spawned the American Athletic Conference.

Bryant McIntosh

Bryant Scott McIntosh (born November 20, 1994) is an American basketball player for the Leuven Bears of the Belgian Pro Basketball League. He played college basketball for Northwestern Wildcats men's basketball. He holds the Northwestern single-game, single-season and career assist records. He was a 2017 All-Big Ten team 2nd team selection and led the 2016–17 Northwestern Wildcats to the first NCAA Tournament in school history.

Buddy Hield

Chavano Rainer "Buddy" Hield (born December 17, 1992) is a Bahamian professional basketball player for the Sacramento Kings of the National Basketball Association (NBA). He was named the Big 12 Conference Men's Basketball Player of the Year in 2015 and 2016, and in 2016, he received four major national player of the year awards—the John R. Wooden Award, the Naismith Award, Sporting News Player of the Year, and the Oscar Robertson Trophy. Hield was selected with the sixth overall pick in the 2016 NBA draft by the New Orleans Pelicans.

Danny Ainge

Daniel Ray Ainge (born March 17, 1959) is an American basketball executive and former professional basketball and baseball player. Ainge is currently the general manager and President of Basketball Operations for the Boston Celtics of the National Basketball Association (NBA).

Ainge was an outstanding high school athlete. At Brigham Young University, he was named national basketball college player of the year and won the John R. Wooden Award for the most outstanding male college basketball player. While in college, Ainge also played parts of three seasons with the Toronto Blue Jays of Major League Baseball (MLB), mostly as a second baseman. He was then drafted into the NBA by the Celtics. Ainge completed 14 seasons, playing for the Celtics, Portland Trail Blazers, Sacramento Kings and Phoenix Suns, primarily as a shooting guard. He went on to coach the Suns for three seasons before joining management of the Celtics, with whom Ainge has three NBA Championships to his credit (two as a player, one as President/GM).

He is the only person to be named a high school first team All-American in American football, basketball, and baseball.

Deonte Burton (basketball, born 1991)

Deonte Deron Burton (born July 26, 1991) is an American professional basketball player for the Salt Lake City Stars of the NBA G League. He completed his college career for the University of Nevada, where he was named an All-American in 2012.

Frank Mason III

Frank Leo Mason III (born April 3, 1994) is an American professional basketball player for the Sacramento Kings of the National Basketball Association (NBA). He played college basketball for the University of Kansas, where he was the starting point guard for the Jayhawks. For the 2016–17 season, he was named National Player of the Year by all of the major national player awards, making him consensus national player of the year. The awards are the John R. Wooden Award, CBS Sports National Player of the Year, the USA Today, the Sporting News Player of the Year, Associated Press Player of the Year, Naismith College Player of the Year, Oscar Robertson Trophy, and NABC Player of the Year. He was also a consensus All-American selection for his senior season at Kansas.

Helms Foundation College Basketball Player of the Year

The Helms Foundation College Basketball Player of the Year was an annual basketball award given to the most outstanding intercollegiate men's basketball player in the United States. The award was first given following the 1904–05 season and ceased being awarded after the 1978–79 season. It was the first major most valuable player (MVP) award for men's basketball in the United States, and the Helms Athletic Foundation was considered within the basketball community to be the authority on men's college basketball for that era. Thus, the award was viewed as the premier player of the year award one could receive up until the 1960s, at which point the Naismith College Player of the Year and John R. Wooden Award took over as the national season MVP awards.

Lauri Markkanen

Lauri Elias Markkanen (born May 22, 1997) is a Finnish professional basketball player for the Chicago Bulls of the National Basketball Association (NBA). In the 2017 NBA draft, he was taken by the Minnesota Timberwolves with the seventh overall pick before being included in a trade to the Chicago Bulls for Jimmy Butler. He is the son of Finnish basketball players Pekka and Riikka Markkanen, and a brother of soccer player Eero Markkanen.

Los Angeles Athletic Club

Los Angeles Athletic Club (LAAC) is a privately owned athletic club and social club in Los Angeles, California, US. Established in 1880, the club is today best known for its John R. Wooden Award presented to the outstanding men's and women's college basketball player of each year.

Metro Conference Men's Basketball Player of the Year

The Metro Conference Men's Basketball Player of the Year was a basketball award given to the Metropolitan Intercollegiate Athletic (Metro) Conference's most outstanding player. The award was first given following the 1976–77 season and was discontinued after the 1994–95 season. In 1995 the Metro Conference merged with the Great Midwest Conference to form Conference USA.

There were three ties in the award's history, in 1978, 1981 and 1988. One player, Darrell Griffith of Louisville, was also named the National Player of the Year (1980) by being presented the John R. Wooden Award.

Louisville represents the most all-time winners of the Metro Conference Men's Basketball Player of the Year with eight. The second most belong to Southern Mississippi with three (all of which belong to Clarence Weatherspoon). Weatherspoon was the only three-time winner of the award, while two others earned it twice (Keith Lee and Clifford Rozier).

Muffet McGraw

Ann "Muffet" McGraw (born December 5, 1955) is an American basketball coach, currently the head women's basketball coach at Notre Dame, where she has compiled a 905–272 (.769) record over 32 seasons. She has led her team to nine Final Fours (1997, 2001, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015, 2018 and 2019) and seven championship game appearances (2001, 2011, 2012, 2014, 2015, 2018, and 2019), and won the National Championship in 2001 and 2018.

McGraw was born in Pottsville, Pennsylvania. She graduated from Saint Joseph's University and briefly played professionally for the California Dreams of the Women's Professional Basketball League. She coached at Archbishop Carroll HS from 1977 to 1979, and worked as an assistant coach at Saint Joseph's from 1980 to 1982. From 1982 to 1987 she was head coach at Lehigh.

She became head coach at Notre Dame in 1987. Since then, McGraw has led the Irish to 24 NCAA tournament appearances including a current streak of 22 straight. In the current streak, Notre Dame made it to the second round in all but one of the appearances. McGraw has compiled 50 wins over ranked opponents, including 40 over the last 8 seasons. Her teams appeared in the AP poll 139 times during her tenure. Notre Dame finished in the Top 3 of the Big East in 9 out of the 11 seasons they were in the league and finished in first place in the Atlantic Coast Conference in all 4 seasons since they entered the conference.

McGraw was awarded the US Basketball Writers Association (USBWA) Coach of the Year award, the Women's Basketball Coaches Association Coach of the Year and the Naismith College Coach of the Year in 2001. She was inducted into the Women's Basketball Hall of Fame in 2011 and the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame in 2017. In 2016, the John R Wooden award committee recognized McGraw with the 2017 Legends of Coaching Award.She is the 27th coach in NCAA history to win over 500 career games, and is currently tied as the eighth head coach in NCAA Division I basketball history to reach 800 career wins. On April 1, 2018, McGraw achieved her 800th career victory at Notre Dame with a win over the Mississippi State Bulldogs in the National Championship game, her second national title with the Fighting Irish. On December 30, 2018, she notched her 900th career win against Lehigh, the team at which she began her collegiate coaching career in 1982.

Riquna Williams

Riquna "Bay Bay" Williams (born May 28, 1990) is an American basketball player for the Los Angeles Sparks of the Women's National Basketball Association (WNBA). She played collegiately for the Miami Hurricanes of the University of Miami, where she majored in sports administration.Riquna's nickname is Bay Bay. She is the youngest of five children. As a senior in high school she averaged 32.5 points per game at Pahokee High School. As a freshman at the University of Miami she averaged 8.7 points per game, including a season high of 23 points against Clemson.She was first discovered during the summer going into her senior year of high school playing for Team Breakdown.

She emerged as one of the best scorers in the country in her sophomore year, and averaged 19.6 points per game. She was named to the All-ACC Second Team her sophomore yearWilliams was named to the pre-season Wooden watch list, a list of players under consideration for the John R. Wooden Award, which will be presented to the outstanding player of the year at the end of the season.

Sean Elliott

Sean Michael Elliott (born February 2, 1968) is an American former professional basketball player who starred at small forward in both the college and professional ranks. He attended the University of Arizona, where he had a standout career as a two-time All-American, winner of the 1989 John R. Wooden Award, the 1989 Adolph Rupp Trophy, the 1989 NABC Player of the Year, 1989 AP Player of the Year, and two time Pac-12 Player of the Year (in 1988–1989).

He was the third pick of the 1989 NBA draft, was named to the 1990 NBA All-Rookie Second Team, was a two-time NBA All-Star, and earned an NBA championship in 1999.

His #32 is retired by both the University of Arizona and the San Antonio Spurs.

Western Athletic Conference Men's Basketball Player of the Year

The Western Athletic Conference Men's Basketball Player of the Year is a basketball award given to the Western Athletic Conference's (WAC) most outstanding player. The award was first given following the 1980–81 season. Keith Van Horn of Utah and Nick Fazekas of Nevada are the only players to have won the award three times. Three other players—Michael Cage, Josh Grant and Melvin Ely—have won the award twice. Danny Ainge, the first ever WAC Player of the Year, was also the John R. Wooden Award winner in 1980–81.

Utah has the most all-time winners with seven. There have been four ties in the award's history, most notably in 1982–83 when there was a three-way tie. Due mainly to major membership turnover from 2010 to 2014, only three current WAC members, New Mexico State, UMKC and Utah Valley, have had a winner.

Men's college basketball awards (United States)
National players of the year
Individual awards
Conference players of the year
Head coach awards
Conference coaches of the year
Division awards
Other awards
Women's college basketball awards (United States)
National players of the year
Individual awards
Conference players of the year
Head coach awards
Conference coaches of the year
Other awards
John R. Wooden Women's Player of the Year Award winners
John R. Wooden Legends of Coaching Award winners

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