John Pedler

John Nicholas Pedler (25 January 1870 – 10 August 1942) was an Australian politician. He was a member of the South Australian House of Assembly from 1918 to 1938, representing the electorate of Wallaroo.[1]

Pedler was born at Salisbury, and educated at the public school at Paskerville. He was raised on the family farm, "Gum Farm", three miles from Kadina, on which he helped until he was 18. Pedler was a contractor and carter thereafter until 1900, when he inherited the farm and returned to run the property, becoming a successful wheat grower. He became involved in local politics, serving on the Kadina District Council for about thirty years, eventually becoming its chairman, and serving as president of the Kadina branch of the Labor Party. He also served as chairman of the local Agricultural Bureau, President of the Kadina Technical School Council and Vice-President of the Kadina Branch of the Australian Workers Union. [2][3]

Pedler was elected to the House of Assembly for the Labor Party at the 1918 state election, along with future Premier Robert Richards, who Pedler would remain associated with throughout his career. Pedler and Richards defeated two ex-Labor defectors, former Premier John Verran and John Frederick Herbert, who had been expelled from the Labor Party in the 1917 Labor split and had contested the election for the splinter National Party.[4] He was re-elected in 1921, 1924, 1927 and 1930.[5]

In 1931, Pedler was expelled from the Labor Party along with Premier Lionel Hill and his Cabinet, when the party split over the Hill Cabinet's support for the Premiers' Plan.[6] The expelled MPs reconstituted as the splinter Parliamentary Labor Party and contested the 1933 election under that banner, but were resoundingly defeated, Pedler and Richards being among their only MPs to be re-elected.[7][8] Pedler was readmitted to the Labor Party in 1934 along with the remaining PLP MPs.[9] In 1938, the state abolished multi-member districts for the House of Assembly, and established single-member electorates instead. Pedler lost a Labor preselection vote for the new single-member seat of Wallaroo to Richards, and opted to retire from parliament.[10]

Pedler died suddenly in 1942. He was still a member of the Kadina Council at the time of his death.[11]

John Pedler

References

  1. ^ "Mr John Pedler". Parliament of South Australia. Retrieved 29 May 2015.
  2. ^ "OBITUARY". The Kadina and Wallaroo Times. SA: National Library of Australia. 14 August 1942. p. 3. Retrieved 29 May 2015.
  3. ^ Labor's thirty years' record in South Australia : a short history of the Labor movement in South Australia, including biographical sketches of leading members, 1893–1923. Adelaide: Daily Herald. 1923. p. 73.
  4. ^ "Kadina & Wallaroo Times". The Kadina and Wallaroo Times. SA: National Library of Australia. 10 April 1918. p. 2. Retrieved 29 May 2015.
  5. ^ "Statistical Register of the Parliament of South Australia" (PDF). Retrieved 29 May 2015.
  6. ^ "New Labor Party Being Formed". The Mail. Adelaide: National Library of Australia. 21 November 1931. p. 2. Retrieved 29 May 2015.
  7. ^ "THE ELECTIONS. OLD MEMBERS RETURNED AGAIN". The Kadina and Wallaroo Times. SA: National Library of Australia. 12 April 1933. p. 2. Retrieved 29 May 2015.
  8. ^ "LABOUR DEFEATED. SOUTH AUSTRALIAN POLL". Western Mail. Perth: National Library of Australia. 13 April 1933. p. 19. Retrieved 29 May 2015.
  9. ^ "A.L.P. ACCEPTS UNITY RECOMMENDATIONS". The Advertiser. Adelaide: National Library of Australia. 18 June 1934. p. 9. Retrieved 29 May 2015.
  10. ^ "DECISION AT WALLAROO". The Advertiser. Adelaide: National Library of Australia. 10 February 1938. p. 20. Retrieved 29 May 2015.
  11. ^ "TRIBUTE TO LATE CR. J. N. PEDLER". The Kadina and Wallaroo Times. SA: National Library of Australia. 4 September 1942. p. 4. Retrieved 29 May 2015.
Candidates of the 1918 South Australian state election

This is a list of candidates of the 1918 South Australian state election.

Candidates of the 1921 South Australian state election

This is a list of candidates of the 1921 South Australian state election.

Candidates of the 1924 South Australian state election

This is a list of candidates of the 1924 South Australian state election.

Candidates of the 1927 South Australian state election

This is a list of candidates of the 1927 South Australian state election. The conservative Liberal Federation and Country Party ran a combined ticket for this election, known as the "Pact".

Candidates of the 1930 South Australian state election

This is a list of candidates of the 1930 South Australian state election. The conservative Liberal Federation and Country Party, which had run a combined ticket known as the "Pact" in 1927, ran separately in 1930.

Candidates of the 1933 South Australian state election

This is a list of candidates of the 1933 South Australian state election.

Candidates of the 1938 South Australian state election

This is a list of candidates of the 1938 South Australian state election. The House of Assembly changed from having multi-member to single-member electorates at this election, which combined with the partisan turmoil of the two previous terms saw a number of formerly partisan figures run as independents at this election.

District Council of Kadina

The District Council of Kadina was a local government area in South Australia from 1888 to 1984.

Electoral district of Wallaroo

Wallaroo is a defunct electoral district that elected members to the House of Assembly, the lower house of the bicameral legislature of the Australian state of South Australia. It was established in 1875 and abolished in 1970.Successful 1891 Wallaroo by-election candidate Richard Hooper was the first Labor member of the House of Assembly, but was not a member of the newly formed United Labor Party (ULP), instead serving as an Independent Labor member. The 1892 East Adelaide by-election saw ULP candidate John McPherson win the seat. It was the first time the ULP had won a seat in the House of Assembly, with electoral success to be followed at the 1893 colonial election, winning 10 of 54 seats and the balance of power, allowing the ULP to support the liberal opposition led by Charles Kingston in defeating the conservative government led by John Downer.

The town of Wallaroo is currently located in the safe Liberal seat of Goyder. The two current Wallaroo booths totaling 3,000 voters are both marginally Liberal.

John Verran

John Verran (9 July 1856 – 7 June 1932) was the 26th Premier of South Australia from 1910 to 1912 and a senator for South Australia from August 1927 to November 1928, representing the South Australian United Labor Party. The 1910 state election saw Labor form a majority government, the first time a party had done so in South Australia. He was a resident of Moonta, and was member for the South Australian House of Assembly seat of Wallaroo from 1901 to 1918. As premier, Verran helped to improve conditions for Aborigines while also making efforts to make home ownership more possible for the underprivileged.

Kalbeeba, South Australia

Kalbeeba is a locality east of Gawler in South Australia. It is named for a former railway station on the Barossa Valley railway line. The northern boundary of Kalbeeba is now the Barossa Valley Way, and its southwestern boundary is the South Para River.

The Concordia brigade of the Country Fire Service is based in the northeastern corner of Kalbeeba. The western end of the Jack Bobridge Track (a shared walking and cycling track) is adjacent to the railway line in Kalbeeba.

Members of the South Australian House of Assembly, 1918–1921

This is a list of members of the South Australian House of Assembly from 1918 to 1921, as elected at the 1918 state election:

1 Alexandra Liberal MHA Archibald Peake died on 6 April 1920. Liberal candidate Herbert Hudd won the resulting by-election on 12 June.

2 East Torrens MHA John Albert Southwood resigned from the National Party in 1920 and served out his term as an independent Labor member.

3 Murray Liberal MHA Angas Parsons resigned on 5 January 1921. No by-election was held due to the proximity of the 1921 state election.

4 Sturt Liberal MHA Edward Vardon resigned on 15 February 1921 in order to nominate for a casual vacancy in the Australian Senate. No by-election was held due to the proximity of the 1921 state election.

Members of the South Australian House of Assembly, 1921–1924

This is a list of members of the South Australian House of Assembly from 1921 to 1924, as elected at the 1921 state election:

1 The parliamentary wing of the Farmers and Settlers Association had been referred to by a variety of labels prior to this term of parliament, and had contested the 1921 election independently of the National-dominated "Progressive Country Party". After the 1921 election, the party formally adopted the "Country Party" name, consistent with their federal counterparts.

2 Alexandra Liberal MHA George Ritchie resigned on 2 November 1922. Liberal candidate Percy Heggaton won the resulting by-election on 20 January 1923.

3 The Liberal Union and the National Party merged in October 1923 to form the Liberal Federation.

Members of the South Australian House of Assembly, 1924–1927

This is a list of members of the South Australian House of Assembly from 1924 to 1927, as elected at the 1924 state election:

1 Barossa Liberal MHA William Hague died on 9 October 1924. Liberal candidate Henry Crosby won the resulting by-election on 22 November.

2 Port Adelaide Labor MHA John Price resigned on 21 April 1925. Labor candidate John Stanley Verran won the resulting by-election on 20 June.

3 East Torrens Labor MHA Harry Kneebone resigned on 30 September 1925 to contest the 1925 federal election. Liberal candidate Walter Hamilton won the resulting by-election on 28 November.

4 Yorke Peninsula Liberal MHA Peter Allen died on 22 October 1925. Liberal candidate Edward Giles won the resulting by-election on 20 January 1926.

5 Stanley Liberal MHA Sir Henry Barwell resigned on 17 December 1925. Liberal candidate John Lyons won the resulting by-election on 16 March 1926.

6 Adelaide Labor MHA John Gunn resigned on 28 August 1926. Labor candidate Herbert George won the resulting by-election on 21 September.

Members of the South Australian House of Assembly, 1927–1930

This is a list of members of the South Australian House of Assembly from 1927 to 1930, as elected at the 1927 state election:

1 Port Adelaide Independent Labor MHA Thomas Thompson was unseated on 30 May 1927, after a challenge from defeated Labor MHA Frank Condon over a defamatory pamphlet. Thompson contested and won the resulting by-election on 2 July.

2 In February 1928, four members of the Country Party, Reginald Carter (Burra Burra), Edward Coles (Flinders) and Malcolm McIntosh and Frederick McMillan (Albert), resigned from the party and joined the Liberal Federation following the breakdown of amalgamation talks.

3 Wooroora Liberal MHA James McLachlan resigned on 31 January 1930. No by-election was held due to the proximity of the 1930 state election.

Members of the South Australian House of Assembly, 1930–1933

This is a list of members of the South Australian House of Assembly from 1930 to 1933, as elected at the 1930 state election:

1 Adelaide MHA Bert Edwards had his seat vacated for absence without leave on 23 June 1931. Lang Plan Campaign Committee candidate Martin Collaton won the resulting by-election on 25 July. He sat in parliament as a member of the new Lang Labor Party.

2 The Labor Party split in August 1931 over the Cabinet's support for the Premiers' Plan. The state conference of the party expelled the 21 MHAs who had supported it in parliament: Lionel Hill, Bill Denny, Robert Richards, John McInnes, Sydney McHugh, Eric Shepherd, Frank Staniford, Frederick Birrell, Alfred Blackwell, Thomas Butterfield, Clement Collins, Jack Critchley, Even George, William Harvey, Leonard Hopkins, Robert Hunter, Beasley Kearney, Arthur McArthur, John Pedler, Albert Thompson, and Walter Warne. They appealed the decision, but by November most had accepted their expulsion and formed a separate party, the Parliamentary Labor Party; the remnants of the caucus continued to sit as official Labor.

3 Sturt MHA Bob Dale was also expelled from the Labor Party in August 1931 for supporting the rival Lang Plan of New South Wales Premier Jack Lang. He subsequently sat as a member of the nascent Lang Labor Party.

4 Victoria MHA Peter Reidy died on 17 January 1932. Liberal candidate Vernon Petherick won the resulting by-election on 5 March.

5 The Lang Labor Party split in April 1932, with MHA Martin Collaton and a number of senior officials forming the Lang Australian Labor Party. The party merged into the official Labor Party in October.

6 The Liberal Federation merged with the SA branch of the Country Party to form the Liberal and Country League on 9 June 1932.

7 Two expelled MHAs, Albert Thompson and Beasley Kearney, were reinstated to the official Labor Party in June 1932 after an appeal to the party's federal executive. A third MHA, Walter Warne, was also readmitted by the time of the 1933 election.

Members of the South Australian House of Assembly, 1933–1938

This is a list of members of the South Australian House of Assembly from 1933 to 1938, as elected at the 1933 state election:

1 The governing Labor Party had split into three separate factions prior to the 1933 state election due to disputes over the handling of the Great Depression. Robert Richards, the Labor Premier going into the election, had been expelled from the party along with much of the parliamentary caucus for supporting the Premiers' Plan. Richards and his supporters accordingly contested the election under the banner of the Parliamentary Labor Party. The official ALP, consisting of the party administration, several dissident MHAs and much of the party grassroots, ran a mostly new slate of candidates. A number of MHAs and party officials also formed a third faction, the Lang Labor Party, associated with the ideas of New South Wales Premier Jack Lang. All three factions won seats in the election.

2 Two of the three Lang Labor Party MHAs, Bob Dale and Tom Howard left the party in 1933 after falling out with leader Doug Bardolph and formed their own party, the South Australian Lang Labor Party (SALLP).

3 Barossa independent MHA Dr Herbert Basedow died on 4 June 1933. LCL candidate Reginald Rudall won the resulting by-election on 8 July.

4 Alexandra LCL MHA George Laffer died on 7 December 1933. Independent candidate George Connor won the resulting by-election on 10 February 1934.

5 The four Labor factions reunited in June 1934 after an extended reconciliation process. All members of the four factions rejoined the official Labor Party as a result.

6 Wooroora LCL MHA Archie Cameron resigned on 7 August 1934 in order to contest the federal seat of Barker at the 1934 federal election. Independent candidate Albert Robinson won the resulting by-election on 29 September.

7 Adelaide MHA and former Lang Labor Party leader Doug Bardolph was expelled from the Labor Party in 1935. He served out the remainder of his term as an independent.

8 Port Pirie Labor MHA John Fitzgerald died on 22 December 1936. Labor candidate William Threadgold was elected to the vacancy unopposed on 3 March 1937.

Parliamentary Labor Party

The Parliamentary Labor Party (also known as the Premiers' Plan Labor Party or Ministerial Labor Party) was a political party active in South Australia from August 1931 until June 1934.

The party came into existence as a result of intense dispute, especially within the Australian Labor Party, about the handling of the response to the Great Depression in Australia. In June 1931, a meeting of state premiers agreed on the Premiers' Plan, which involved sweeping austerity measures combined with increases in revenue. When the Premiers' Plan came up for a vote in South Australia, 23 of Labor's 30 House of Assembly members and two of Labor's four Legislative Council members voted for it. In August 1931, the South Australian state conference of the Labor Party expelled all of the MPs who supported the Premiers' Plan, including Premier Lionel Hill and his entire Cabinet.Expelled MPs (23) in the House of Assembly:

Frederick Birrell

Alfred Blackwell

Thomas Butterfield

Clement Collins

George Cooke

Jack Critchley

Bill Denny

Thomas Edwards

Even George

William Harvey

Lionel Hill

Leonard Hopkins

Robert Hunter

Beasley Kearney

Arthur McArthur

Sydney McHugh

John McInnes

John Pedler

Robert Richards

Eric Shepherd

Frank Staniford

Albert Thompson

Walter WarneExpelled MPs (2) in the Legislative Council:

James Jelley

Stanley WhitfordUpon the failure of a November appeal to the federal executive of the Labor Party, the expelled MPs definitively constituted themselves as a separate parliamentary party.Having soundly lost its majority, the PLP ministry stayed in office until the 1933 election with the support of the conservative opposition--the Liberal Federation to 1932 and the Liberal and Country League afterward. Hill, facing increasing political challenges, had himself appointed Agent-General in London and abruptly quit politics in February 1932. Robert Richards briefly succeeded him as Premier, and led the party into the 1933 election.The party, along with the official Labor Party and the rival splinter Lang Labor Party, performed poorly at the 1933 election. Of the 23 MPs the party had going into the election, only five – Blackwell, McInnes, Pedler, and Richards in the House of Assembly, and Whitford in the Legislative Council, were reelected. The three Labor factions won only 13 seats between them, against 29 for the LCL.Two of the three Lang Labor Party MHAs elected at the 1933 state election, Bob Dale and Tom Howard, left the party in 1933 post-election after falling out with leader Doug Bardolph and formed their own party, the South Australian Lang Labor Party (SALLP).

The four Labor parties merged back into the official Labor Party in June 1934 under the leadership of Andrew Lacey of the official Labor faction, following a successful unity conference. Whitford, the party's sole upper house member, had left the party to sit as an independent by the time of the conference, and was not re-admitted.

Robert Richards (Australian politician)

Robert Stanley "Bob" Richards (31 May 1885 – 24 April 1967), generally referred to as "R. S. Richards" was the 32nd Premier of South Australia, representing the South Australian Branch of the Australian Labor Party.

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