John Newcombe

John David Newcombe, AO, OBE (born 23 May 1944) is a former tennis player from Australia who is one of the few men to have attained a world No. 1 ranking in both singles and doubles. At the majors he won seven singles titles and a former record 17 men's doubles titles. He also contributed to five Davis Cup titles for Australia during an age when Davis Cup was deemed as significant as the majors.[2] Tennis magazine rated him the 10th best male player of the period 1965–2005.

John Newcombe
John Newcombe c1974
John Newcombe c. 1974
Country (sports)Australia Australia
ResidenceSydney, New South Wales, Australia
Born23 May 1944 (age 74)
Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
Height1.83 m (6 ft 0 in)
Turned pro1967 (amateur tour from 1960)
Retired1981
PlaysRight-handed (one-handed backhand)
Prize moneyUS$1,062,408
Int. Tennis HoF1986 (member page)
Singles
Career record532–185 (74.2%)
Career titles68 (including 34 listed by the ATP)
Highest rankingNo. 1 (1967, Lance Tingay)[1]
No. 1 (3 June 1974) per ATP
Grand Slam Singles results
Australian OpenW (1973, 1975)
French OpenQF (1965, 1969)
WimbledonW (1967, 1970, 1971)
US OpenW (1967, 1973)
Other tournaments
Tour FinalsSF (1973, 1974)
WCT FinalsW (1974)
Professional majors
Doubles
Career record333–115 (74.33%)
Career titles33
Highest rankingNo. 1 (1965)
Grand Slam Doubles results
Australian OpenW (1965, 1967, 1971, 1973, 1976)
French OpenW (1967, 1969, 1973)
WimbledonW (1965, 1966, 1968, 1969, 1970, 1974)
US OpenW (1967, 1971, 1973)
Mixed doubles
Grand Slam Mixed Doubles results
Australian OpenW (1965)
French OpenF (1965)
US OpenW (1964)
Team competitions
Davis CupW (1964, 1965, 1966, 1967, 1973)

Biography

Newcombe played several sports as a boy before devoting himself to tennis. He was the Australian junior champion from 1961 to 1963 and was a member of Australia's Davis Cup winning team in 1964. He won his first Grand Slam title in 1965 by taking the Australian Championships doubles title with fellow Australian Tony Roche. That same year, the duo won the Wimbledon doubles title. They teamed to win the Australian doubles championship three more times, Wimbledon another four times and the US Championships in 1967, the French Championships in 1967, and the French Open in 1969. They won 12 Grand Slam titles, which remained the all-time record for a men's doubles team until 2013, when it was surpassed by Bob and Mike Bryan.

Newcombe's powerful serve and volley was the backbone of his attacking game. He frequently came up with a second-serve ace. He was the top ranked amateur in the world in 1967 according to Lance Tingay, although Rex Bellamy ranked him second behind Roy Emerson. As a professional, Newcombe was the joint world No. 1 player in 1970 and 1971. In singles play, he was a two-time winner of the Australian Open, a three-time winner of Wimbledon, and a two-time winner of the US Open.

In January 1968 he signed a three-year professional contract with Lamar Hunt's World Championship Tennis (WCT) and became part of the "Handsome Eight", the original eight WCT players.[3] As a member of the WCT professional tour group and the players' union, Newcombe was banned by the International Tennis Federation from competing in the 1972 Wimbledon Championships and he joined the ATP boycott of the event in 1973.

Newcombe was the last of the Australians who dominated tennis in the 1950s, 60s and 70s.

In his 1979 autobiography, Jack Kramer, the long-time tennis promoter and great player himself, included Newcombe in his list of the 21 greatest players of all time.[4]

Newcombe was captain of the Australian Davis Cup team from 1995 until 2000.

Newcombe was inducted into the Sport Australia Hall of Fame in 1985 and in 1986 his achievements were recognised with his induction into the International Tennis Hall of Fame.[5]

Grand Slam finals

Singles (7 titles, 3 runners-up)

Result Year Championship Surface Opponent Score
Loss 1966 U.S. Championships Grass Australia Fred Stolle 6–4, 10–12, 3–6, 4–6
Win 1967 Wimbledon Grass West Germany Wilhelm Bungert 6–2, 6–1, 6–1
Win 1967 U.S. Championships Grass United States Clark Graebner 6–4, 6–4, 8–6
Loss 1969 Wimbledon Grass Australia Rod Laver 4–6, 7–5, 4–6, 4–6
Win 1970 Wimbledon Grass Australia Ken Rosewall 5–7, 6–3, 6–2, 3–6, 6–1
Win 1971 Wimbledon Grass United States Stan Smith 6–3, 5–7, 2–6, 6–4, 6–4
Win 1973 Australian Open Grass New Zealand Onny Parun 6–3, 6–7, 7–5, 6–1
Win 1973 US Open Grass Czechoslovakia Jan Kodeš 6–4, 1–6, 4–6, 6–2, 6–3
Win 1975 Australian Open Grass United States Jimmy Connors 7–5, 3–6, 6–4, 7–6
Loss 1976 Australian Open Grass Australia Mark Edmondson 7–6, 3–6, 6–7, 1–6

Grand Slam performance timeline

Singles

Tournament 1960 1961 1962 1963 1964 1965 1966 1967 1968 1969 1970 1971 1972 1973 1974 1975 1976 1977 1978
Australian Open 1R A QF QF QF SF SF SF A QF QF 3R QF W QF W F QF A
French Open A 3R 3R A 2R QF 3R 4R A QF A A A 1R A A 1R A A
Wimbledon A 1R 2R 1R 1R 4R 3R W 4R F W W A A QF A 3R A 4R
US Open A A A 4R A A F W QF SF SF 1R 3R W SF A A A A

Source: ITF[6]

Distinctions

  • Newcombe served as chairman of the International Tennis Players Association which formed in 1969.[7]
  • He served as President of the Association of Tennis Professionals in 1977 and 1978.
  • Overall, he won 26 Grand Slam titles in singles, doubles, and mixed doubles (27 if his 1965 mixed doubles shared win is added).
  • Newcombe and Rod Laver are the only players to ever win both the US Open and Wimbledon men's singles titles as an amateur and as a professional. The grass surfaces favoured his game, and the French Open's clay surface was the only major singles championship he never won. However, he did take the French doubles title on three occasions.
  • He is an Australian Living Treasure.
  • The Newcombe Medal, awarded yearly to the most outstanding Australian tennis player, is named in honour of his tennis achievements.[8]
  • He runs the John Newcombe Tennis Ranch & Tennis Academy in New Braunfels, Texas.
  • In 2001 he was revealed to be President George W. Bush's drinking companion on the night of 4 September 1976, when Bush was charged with driving under the influence.[9] This controversy surfaced during the 2000 US Presidential Election.
  • He partners with Cliff Drysdale to develop the John Newcombe Estate & Country Club in New Braunfels, Texas.[10]

See also

Notes

  1. ^ United States Lawn Tennis Association (1972). Official Encyclopedia of Tennis (First Edition), p. 428.
  2. ^ Tignor, Steve (6 December 2013). "40 Years Ago: Look Out, Cleveland". tennis.com. Retrieved 12 May 2015.
  3. ^ "$1,418,000 goal for Newcombe and Roche". The Canberra Times. 4 January 1968. p. 26 – via National Library of Australia.
  4. ^ In his 1979 autobiography Kramer considered the best player ever to have been either Don Budge (for consistent play) or Ellsworth Vines (at the height of his game). The next four best were, chronologically, Bill Tilden, Fred Perry, Bobby Riggs, and Pancho Gonzales. After these six came the "second echelon" of Rod Laver, Lew Hoad, Ken Rosewall, Gottfried von Cramm, Ted Schroeder, Jack Crawford, Pancho Segura, Frank Sedgman, Tony Trabert, John Newcombe, Arthur Ashe, Stan Smith, Björn Borg, and Jimmy Connors. He felt unable to rank Henri Cochet and René Lacoste accurately but felt they were among the very best.
  5. ^ "John Newcombe AO OBE". Sport Australia Hall of Fame. Retrieved 14 December 2013.
  6. ^ "Player Details – John Newcombe". ITF.
  7. ^ "Net Group to Discuss South African Ban". The Milwaukee Journal. 24 June 1969. Retrieved 21 September 2012.
  8. ^ "The Awards". www.tennis.com.au. Tennis Australia.
  9. ^ Fenton, Ben. (9 March 2001) Newcombe recalls Bush's brush with law. Telegraph.co.uk. Retrieved on 2016-07-12.
  10. ^ John Newcombe Estate & Country Club. newcombeestate.com (March 2008)

External links

Achievements
Preceded by
Ilie Năstase
World No. 1
3 June 1974 – 28 July 1974
Succeeded by
Jimmy Connors
1968 World Championship Tennis circuit

The 1968 World Championship Tennis circuit was the inaugural tour of the (WCT) one of the two rival professional male tennis tours of 1968 the other being the National Tennis League. The tour began on 22 January in Sydney, Australia and ended on 13 October in Durban, South Africa.

1970 Wimbledon Championships

The 1970 Wimbledon Championships was a tennis tournament that took place on the outdoor grass courts at the All England Lawn Tennis and Croquet Club in Wimbledon, London, United Kingdom. The tournament was held from Monday 22 June until Saturday 4 July 1970. It was the 84th staging of the Wimbledon Championships, and the third Grand Slam tennis event of 1970.

1971 Wimbledon Championships

The 1971 Wimbledon Championships was a tennis tournament that took place on the outdoor grass courts at the All England Lawn Tennis and Croquet Club in Wimbledon, London, United Kingdom. The tournament was held from Monday 21 June until Saturday 3 July 1971. It was the 85th staging of the Wimbledon Championships, and the third Grand Slam tennis event of 1971. John Newcombe and Evonne Goolagong won the singles titles.

1971 World Championship Tennis circuit

The 1971 World Championship Tennis circuit was one of the two rival professional male tennis circuits of 1971. It was organized by World Championship Tennis (WCT). Points were awarded to players based on their tournament results (ten points for the tournament winner, seven points for the runner–up, four points for the semifinalists, two points for the quarterfinalists and one point for reaching the second round). The circuit included twenty regular events and a WCT circuit final taking place in Houston/Dallas in November for the eight players with the highest points total. Each tournament had a minimum prize money of $50,000.

1972 World Championship Tennis circuit

The 1972 World Championship Tennis circuit was one of the two rival professional male tennis circuits of 1972. It was organized by World Championship Tennis (WCT). The circuit included twenty-three regular events, and two circuit finals, one taking place in May, counting for the second half of the 1971 season, and the first part of the 1972 season, and a smaller one taking place in November, counting for the second half of the 1972 season.

1973 Grand Prix (tennis)

The 1973 Commercial Union Assurance Grand Prix was a tennis circuit administered by the International Lawn Tennis Federation (ILTF) which served as a forerunner to the current Association of Tennis Professionals (ATP) World Tour and the Women's Tennis Association (WTA) Tour. The circuit consisted of the four modern Grand Slam tournaments and open tournaments recognised by the ILTF. This article covers all tournaments that were part of that year's Men's Grand Prix. The Commercial Union Assurance Masters and Davis Cup Final are included in this calendar but did not count towards the Grand Prix.

1974 World Championship Tennis circuit

The 1974 World Championship Tennis (WCT) circuit was one of the two rival professional male tennis circuits of 1974, the other being the Grand Prix circuit. It was organized by World Championship Tennis (WCT). It was the fourth edition of the WCT circuit and a total of 84 players participated. All players took part in the opening U.S. Pro Indoor tournament in Philadelphia and afterwards were divided into three groups (red, blue and green) of 28 players, with each group playing eight further tournaments. The season final was played in Dallas by the eight best performers, the top two of each group plus the next two highest point winners, and was won by Australian John Newcombe who defeated Björn Borg from Sweden in four sets (4–6, 6–3, 6–3, 6–2).

2012 John Newcombe Women's Pro Challenge

The 2012 John Newcombe Women's Pro Challenge was a professional tennis tournament played on outdoor hard courts. It was the first edition of the tournament which was part of the 2012 ITF Women's Circuit. It took place in New Braunfels, Texas, United States, on 29 October–4 November 2012.

2013 John Newcombe Women's Pro Challenge

The 2013 John Newcombe Women's Pro Challenge is a professional tennis tournament played on outdoor hard courts. It is the second edition of the tournament which is part of the 2013 ITF Women's Circuit, offering a total of $50,000 in prize money. It takes place in New Braunfels, Texas, United States, on October 28–November 3, 2013.

2014 John Newcombe Women's Pro Challenge

The 2014 John Newcombe Women's Pro Challenge is a professional tennis tournament played on outdoor hard courts. It is the 3rd edition of the tournament which is part of the 2014 ITF Women's Circuit, offering a total of $50,000 in prize money. It takes place in New Braunfels, Texas, United States between 27 October to 2 November, 2014.

Fred Stolle

Frederick Sydney Stolle, AO (born 8 October 1938) is an Australian former tennis player and commentator. He was born in Hornsby, New South Wales, Australia. He is the father of former Australian Davis Cup player Sandon Stolle.

Geoff Masters

Geoff Masters (born 19 September 1950) is an Australian former tennis player. He was part of doubles winning pairs in the US Open, Australian Open and Wimbledon tournaments during the 1970s.

John Newcombe Women's Pro Challenge

The John Newcombe Women's Pro Challenge was a tournament for professional female tennis players played on outdoor hard courts. The event was classified as a $50,000 ITF Women's Circuit tournament and was held in New Braunfels, Texas, United States, from 2012 to 2014.

John Newcome (academic)

John Newcome, D.D. (b Grantham 10 September 1684 - d Cambridge 10 January 1765) was an eighteenth century academic and priest, most notably Master of St John's College, Cambridge from 1735, and Dean of Rochester from 1744, holding both positions until his death.

Ken Fletcher

Kenneth Norman Fletcher (15 June 1940 – 11 February 2006) was an Australian tennis player who won numerous doubles and mixed doubles Grand Slam titles.

Owen Davidson

Owen Keir Davidson (born 4 October 1943) is a former professional tennis player of the 1960s and 1970s.

Partnering Billie Jean King, Davidson won eight grand slam mixed doubles titles. In 1967 he won a calendar year slam for mixed doubles, when he won the Australian Championships (with Lesley Turner Bowrey), and the French Championships, Wimbledon and the US Championships (with King).

Davidson became the first player to win a match in the open era of tennis when he defeated John Clifton in the first round of the British Hard Court Championships in Bournemouth played in April 1968.His best grand slam singles result was at Wimbledon in 1966, when he reached the semifinals (beating top seed Roy Emerson before losing to Manuel Santana). He is also the 1972 Australian Open and the 1973 US Open men's doubles champion, partnering John Newcombe and Ken Rosewall. He was inducted into the International Tennis Hall of Fame in Newport, Rhode Island in 2010. He was inducted into the Australian Tennis Hall of Fame at the Rod Laver Arena in Melbourne on 26 January 2011 (Australia Day).

Ross Case

Ross Case (born 1 November 1951) is an Australian former tennis player. His career-high singles ranking was world no. 14.

With Geoff Masters, he won two Grand Slam doubles titles: in 1974 at the Australian Open and in 1977 at Wimbledon. He was also runner-up in 1976 at Wimbledon. He played in the Australian Davis Cup team in 1971, 1972, 1976, 1978, and 1979.

Tom Okker

Thomas Samuel Okker (nicknamed "the Flying Dutchman"; born 22 February 1944) is a Dutch former tennis player who was active from the mid-1960s until 1980. He was ranked among the world's top 10 singles players for seven consecutive years, 1968–74, reaching a career high of World No. 3 in 1974. He also was ranked World No. 1 in doubles in 1969.

Tony Roche

Anthony Dalton Roche, AO MBE (born 17 May 1945) is an Australian former professional tennis player, a native of Tarcutta. He played junior tennis in the New South Wales regional city of Wagga Wagga. He won one Grand Slam singles title and thirteen Grand Slam doubles titles, and was ranked as high as World No. 2 by Lance Tingay of The Daily Telegraph in 1969. He also coached multi-Grand Slam winning World No. 1s Ivan Lendl, Patrick Rafter, Roger Federer and Lleyton Hewitt, and former World No. 4 Jelena Dokic.

John Newcombe in the Grand Slam Tournaments

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