John Montefusco

John Joseph Montefusco Jr. (born May 25, 1950), nicknamed "The Count," is a former Major League Baseball pitcher from 1974 to 1986 for the San Francisco Giants, Atlanta Braves, San Diego Padres, and New York Yankees.

John Montefusco
John Montefusco - San Francisco Giants
Pitcher
Born: May 25, 1950 (age 69)
Long Branch, New Jersey
Batted: Right Threw: Right
MLB debut
September 3, 1974, for the San Francisco Giants
Last MLB appearance
May 1, 1986, for the New York Yankees
MLB statistics
Win–loss record90–83
Earned run average3.54
Strikeouts1,081
Teams
Career highlights and awards

Baseball career

Named the National League Rookie of the Year in 1975, Montefusco's nickname was "The Count", a pun on his last name which sounds like Monte Cristo. In his 13-year career, his record was 90-83, with 1,081 strikeouts, and a 3.54 ERA. He was a National League All-Star in 1976, winning a career high 16 games that year.

On September 3, 1974, Montefusco entered his first major league game as a relief pitcher. Not only was he the winning pitcher that day[1], he also hit a home run in his first major-league at-bat[2]. He is one of only a handful of pitchers to do so, and is one of two players to both hit a home run in his first at bat and win the Rookie of the Year Award. The other is Wally Moon.

Before a game against the Los Angeles Dodgers on July 4, 1975, Montefusco guaranteed he would win the game. He proceeded to throw a shutout as the Giants defeated the Dodgers 1–0.[3]

On September 29, 1976, Montefusco threw a no-hitter for the Giants in a 9-0 victory versus the Atlanta Braves. It was the last no-hitter to be thrown by a Giant until Jonathan Sánchez threw one on July 10, 2009. [1]

Legal issues

In October 1997, Montefusco was arrested and charged with beating his former wife of 23 years Doris,[4] whom he had recently divorced, in her Colts Neck, New Jersey home.[5][6] He was held on $60,000 bail and was charged with aggravated sexual assault, making terroristic threats, assault, burglary and criminal mischief.[6] Montefusco was indicted in December 1997 and was held on $1 million in bail.[7]

Montefusco was released on bail in November 1999 after serving more than two years behind bars, and in February 2000, he was acquitted of the most serious charges and found guilty of criminal trespass and simple assault and sentenced to three years of probation.[8]

In 2001, a U.S. district judge in Trenton, New Jersey dismissed a lawsuit filed by Montefusco against the ESPN network. Judge Anne Elise Thompson ruled that being compared to O. J. Simpson is not defamation.[9] During a March 19, 2000 broadcast on ESPN's "SportsCenter 2000," Doris Montefusco had likened her ex-husband to Simpson, who was acquitted in 1995 of the murder of Nicole Brown Simpson. An ESPN announcer during the broadcast had paraphrased Montefusco's ex-wife as saying "the only difference between this and the O.J. Simpson case is that she's alive to talk about it. Nicole Simpson is not."[9]

Coaching career

At the time of his October 1997 arrest, Montefusco had been a pitching instructor for the Tampa Yankees, a minor league team.[6] He later spent several years as the pitching coach for the Somerset Patriots in the independent Atlantic League of Professional Baseball until resigning in September 2005.[10]

See also

References

  1. ^ Hurte, Bob. "John Montefusco". Society for American Baseball Research. Retrieved February 9, 2018.
  2. ^ "John Montefusco Stats". Baseball Almanac. Retrieved February 9, 2018.
  3. ^ Haft, Chris and Cash Kruth (August 10, 2010). "Montefusco familiar with guaranteeing wins". Giants.MLB.com. Major League Baseball. Retrieved August 12, 2012.
  4. ^ "Montefusco can count on it: If news story is true, it's not defamatory - SportsBusiness Daily - SportsBusiness Journal - SportsBusiness Daily Global".
  5. ^ "Archives - Philly.com".
  6. ^ a b c Mckinley, Jesse (20 October 1997). "NEW JERSEY DAILY BRIEFING; Ex-Yankee Pitcher Is Arrested" – via NYTimes.com.
  7. ^ Staff, From; Reports, Wire (21 December 1997). "Lipinski Impressive in Olympic Tuneup" – via LA Times.
  8. ^ The Associated Press (5 February 2000). "PLUS: COURT NEWS; John Montefusco Put on Probation" – via NYTimes.com.
  9. ^ a b "News from the National League".
  10. ^ "Patriots bring in Jeff Scott as pitching coach - OurSports Central".

[1]

[2]

External links

Preceded by
John Candelaria
No-hitter pitcher
September 29, 1976
Succeeded by
Jim Colborn
  1. ^ "Ex-Baseball Star Montefusco Jailed".
  2. ^ "USATODAY.com - Court rules ESPN didn't defame Montefusco".
15th Visual Effects Society Awards

The 15th Visual Effects Society Awards was held in Los Angeles on February 7, 2017, in honor to the best visual effects in film and television of 2016. The nominations were announced on January 10, 2017. The Jungle Book took five awards at the ceremony.

1974 San Francisco Giants season

The 1974 San Francisco Giants season was the Giants' 92nd season in Major League Baseball, their 17th season in San Francisco since their move from New York following the 1957 season, and their 15th at Candlestick Park. The team finished in fifth place in the National League West with a 72–90 record, 30 games behind the Los Angeles Dodgers.

1975 Philadelphia Phillies season

The 1975 Philadelphia Phillies season was the 93rd in the history of the franchise. The Phillies finished in second place in the National League East with a record of 86–76, 6​1⁄2 games behind the NL East champion Pittsburgh Pirates. As a result, the Phillies had their first winning season in eight years.

1976 Major League Baseball season

The 1976 Major League Baseball season was the last post 1961-season until 1993 in which the American League (AL) and the National League (NL) had the same number of teams. The season ended with the Cincinnati Reds taking the World Series Championship for the second consecutive season by sweeping the New York Yankees in four games. It would be the Reds' last title until Lou Piniella guided the club in 1990, and the second time that the Yankees were swept in World Series history. The only team to do it before was the 1963 Los Angeles Dodgers.

1976 Philadelphia Phillies season

The 1976 Philadelphia Phillies season was the 94th season in the history of the franchise. The Phillies won their first National League East title, as they compiled a record of 101–61, nine games ahead of the second-place Pittsburgh Pirates, and won 100 games or more for the first time in franchise history.

The Phillies lost the NLCS, 3–0 to the Cincinnati Reds. Danny Ozark managed the Phillies, as they played their home games at Veterans Stadium, where the All-Star Game was played that season.

1976 San Francisco Giants season

The 1976 San Francisco Giants season was the Giants' 94th season in Major League Baseball, their 19th season in San Francisco since their move from New York following the 1957 season, and their 17th at Candlestick Park. The team finished in fourth place in the National League West with a 74–88 record, 28 games behind the Cincinnati Reds.

1977 San Francisco Giants season

The 1977 San Francisco Giants season was the Giants' 95th season in Major League Baseball, their 20th season in San Francisco since their move from New York following the 1957 season, and their 18th at Candlestick Park. The team finished in fourth place in the National League West with a 75–87 record, 23 games behind the Los Angeles Dodgers.

1978 Cincinnati Reds season

The 1978 Cincinnati Reds season was a season in American baseball. The Reds finished in second place in the National League West with a record of 92-69, 2½ games behind the Los Angeles Dodgers. The Reds were managed by Sparky Anderson and played their home games at Riverfront Stadium. Following the season, Anderson was replaced as manager by John McNamara, and Pete Rose left to sign with the Philadelphia Phillies for the 1979 season.

1978 Philadelphia Phillies season

The 1978 Philadelphia Phillies season was the 96th season in the history of the franchise. The Phillies won their third straight National League East title with a record of 90-72, a game and a half over the Pittsburgh Pirates, as the Phillies defeated the Pirates in Pittsburgh on the next to last day of the season. For the third consecutive season the Phillies came up short in the NLCS, as the Los Angeles Dodgers defeated them three games to one, as they had the previous season. The Phillies were managed by Danny Ozark and played their home games at Veterans Stadium.

1978 San Francisco Giants season

The 1978 San Francisco Giants season was the Giants' 96th season in Major League Baseball, their 21st season in San Francisco since their move from New York following the 1957 season, and their 19th at Candlestick Park. The team finished in third place in the National League West with an 89-73 record, 6 games behind the Los Angeles Dodgers.

1981 Atlanta Braves season

The 1981 Atlanta Braves season was the 16th in Atlanta and the 111th overall.

1982 Philadelphia Phillies season

The 1982 season was the 100th season in Philadelphia Phillies franchise history. During the season, Steve Carlton would be the last pitcher to win at least 20 games in one season for the Phillies in the 20th century. He would also become the first pitcher to win four Cy Young Awards in a career. The 1982 Phillies finished the season with an 89-73 record, placing them in second place in the NL East, three games behind the World Champion St. Louis Cardinals.

1984 New York Yankees season

The New York Yankees' 1984 season was the 82nd season for the Yankees. The team finished in third place in the American League Eastern Division with a record of 87-75, finishing 17 games behind the Detroit Tigers. New York was managed by Yogi Berra. The Yankees played at Yankee Stadium.

1986 New York Yankees season

The New York Yankees' 1986 season was the 84th season for the Yankees. The team finished with a record of 90-72, finishing in second-place, 5.5 games behind the Boston Red Sox. New York was managed by Lou Piniella. The Yankees played at Yankee Stadium.

1992 Baseball Hall of Fame balloting

Elections to the Baseball Hall of Fame for 1992 followed the system in place since 1978.

The Baseball Writers' Association of America (BBWAA) voted by mail to select from recent major league players and

elected two, Rollie Fingers and Tom Seaver.

The Veterans Committee met in closed sessions to consider older major league players as well as managers, umpires, executives, and figures from the Negro Leagues.

It selected two, Bill McGowan and Hal Newhouser.

Jim Colborn

James William Colborn (born May 22, 1946) is a former Major League Baseball pitcher. The right-handed Colborn pitched for the Chicago Cubs (1969-1971), Milwaukee Brewers (1972-1976), Kansas City Royals (1977-1978) and Seattle Mariners (1978).

John Candelaria

John Robert Candelaria (born November 6, 1953) is a retired Major League Baseball pitcher. Nicknamed "The Candy Man", he played for the Pittsburgh Pirates, California Angels, New York Mets, New York Yankees, Montreal Expos, Minnesota Twins, Toronto Blue Jays, and Los Angeles Dodgers between 1975–1993.

List of San Francisco Giants Opening Day starting pitchers

The San Francisco Giants are a Major League Baseball franchise based in San Francisco, California. They moved to San Francisco from New York City in 1958. They play in the National League West division. The first game of the new baseball season for a team is played on Opening Day, and being named the Opening Day starter is an honor, which is often given to the player who is expected to lead the pitching staff that season, though there are various strategic reasons why a team's best pitcher might not start on Opening Day. Through 2016, the Giants have used 30 different Opening Day starting pitchers in their 58 seasons since moving to San Francisco. The 30 starters have a combined Opening Day record of 27 wins, 16 losses and 16 no decisions. No decisions are only awarded to the starting pitcher if the game is won or lost after the starting pitcher has left the game.The first Opening Day game for the San Francisco Giants was played against the Los Angeles Dodgers on April 15, 1958 at Seals Stadium, the Giants' first home ball park in San Francisco. Rubén Gómez was the Giants' Opening Day starting pitcher that day, in a game the Giants lost 8–0. That was the Giants' only Opening Day game at Seals Stadium. They also played in two other home parks in San Francisco: Candlestick Park from 1960 to 1999, and AT&T Park, previously called PacBell Park and SBC Park, since 2000. The Giants' Opening Day starting pitchers had a record of seven wins, three losses and seven no decisions at Candlestick Park and have a record of two wins, one loss and one no decision at AT&T Park. That gives the San Francisco Giants' Opening Day starting pitchers a total home record of 10 wins, 4 losses and 8 no decisions. Their record in Opening Day road games is 17 wins, 12 losses, and 8 no decisions.Juan Marichal holds the San Francisco Giants' record for most Opening Day starts, with 10. Marichal had a record in Opening Day starts of six wins, two losses and two no decisions. Tim Lincecum and Madison Bumgarner each made four Opening Day starts for the Giants, and John Montefusco, Mike Krukow, John Burkett and Liván Hernández each made three Opening Day starts. Sam Jones, Vida Blue, Rick Reuschel, Mark Gardner, Kirk Rueter, Jason Schmidt and Barry Zito have each made two Opening Day starts for the Giants. Marichal has the most wins in Opening Day starts for San Francisco, with six. Reuschel and Burkett are the only pitchers to have won more than one Opening Day start for San Francisco without a loss. Both have records in Opening Day starts of two wins and no losses. Burkett also has a no decision. Zito has the worst record for San Francisco in Opening Day starts, with no wins and two losses. Zito and Marichal have the most losses in Opening Day starts, with two apiece. The Giants have played in the World Series six times since moving to San Francisco, in 1962, 1989, 2002, 2010, 2012 and 2014, winning in 2010, 2012 and 2014. Their Opening Day starting pitchers in those years were Juan Marichal in 1962, Rick Reuschel in 1989, Liván Hernández in 2002, Tim Lincecum in 2010 and 2012, and Madison Bumgarner in 2014. The Giants' Opening Day starting pitchers won four of their six Opening Day starts in those seasons, with their only loss coming in 2012 and a no decision in 2014.

Philip Nastu

Philip Nastu (born March 8, 1955) is a former pitcher in Major League Baseball who played from 1978 through 1980 for the San Francisco Giants.

Born in Bridgeport, Connecticut, Nastu attended Bassick High School and the University of Bridgeport before being signed by the Giants as free agent in 1976.Nastu began his professional pitching career in 1977 with the Cedar Rapids Giants of the Midwest League and the Waterbury Giants of the Eastern League. The next season, he was promoted to the AAA Phoenix Giants of the Pacific Coast League.As a September call-up, Nastu made his MLB debut on September 15, 1978 when the Giants hosted the Cincinnati Reds at Candlestick Park. He pitched the final two innings in the 6–1 loss; although he surrendered a single and walk, no runs scored. His first decision, a loss, came on October 1 (the final game of the season) when the Houston Astros shutout the Giants, 3–0, in the Astrodome. Starting the game, he gave up runs in the first 3 innings before being removed for a pinch hitter in the 5th inning.Although Nastu began the 1979 season back with AAA Phoenix, he was recalled to the majors when John Montefusco was placed on the disabled list in late April. The season was the high-mark of his MLB career when he appeared in 25 games (14 as a starter) pitching 100 innings. After his call-up, he was the starting pitcher on April 30 at the Philadelphia Phillies but lost the 4–1 game, pitching 4​1⁄3 innings. On May 10 he also suffered the 3–0 loss after he gave up a 1st inning home run to the visiting Montreal Expos' Rodney Scott, who only hit 3 in his MLB career. His first victory came on May 15 at the same site as his first career loss when the Giants defeated the Astros, 8–1; pitching his only career complete game, he scattered 5 hits en route to the victory. His second victory came 9 days later hosting the Reds; with the visitors committing 4 errors, Nastu and the Giants posted a 2–1 victory. He suffered his third loss of the season on May 28 while hosting the Atlanta Braves; although he pitched eight innings, the Giants were defeated 4–1.Again in 1980, Nastu opened the season with AAA Phoenix before being recalled in September. Used sparingly, he appeared in only 6 games, pitching six innings, finishing his MLB career on October 3, 1980. In the off season, he was traded along with infielder Joe Strain to the Chicago Cubs in exchange for outfielders Jesús Figueroa and Jerry Martin, and minor league infielder/outfielder Mike Turgeon as a player to be named later.Nastu's last professional appearances came in 1981 and 1982 when he played for the Midland Cubs, the AA affiliate of the Chicago Cubs in the Texas League, and the Charlotte O's, the AA affiliate of the Baltimore Orioles in the Southern League.

This page is based on a Wikipedia article written by authors (here).
Text is available under the CC BY-SA 3.0 license; additional terms may apply.
Images, videos and audio are available under their respective licenses.