John McVie

John Graham McVie (born 26 November 1945) is a British bass guitarist, best known as a member of the rock bands John Mayall & the Bluesbreakers from 1964–1967 and Fleetwood Mac since 1967. His surname, combined with that of Mick Fleetwood, was the inspiration for the band's name. He joined Fleetwood Mac shortly after its formation by guitarist Peter Green in 1967, replacing temporary bass guitarist Bob Brunning. McVie and Fleetwood are the only two members of the group to appear on every Fleetwood Mac release, and for over forty years have been the group's only remaining original members.

In 1968, McVie married blues pianist and singer Christine Perfect, who became a member of Fleetwood Mac two years later. John and Christine McVie divorced in 1977. Around this time the band recorded the album Rumours, a major artistic and commercial success that borrowed its title from the turmoils in McVie's and other band members' marriages and relationships. He was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1998 as a member of Fleetwood Mac.

John McVie
FleetMacTulsa031018-79 (30294524767) (Cropped)
John McVie in 2018
Background information
Birth nameJohn Graham McVie
Born26 November 1945 (age 73)
Ealing, Middlesex, England
Genres
Occupation(s)Musician
Instruments
Years active1963–present
Labels
Associated acts

Early life

John Graham McVie was born in Ealing, then in Middlesex (now in west London), to Reg and Dorothy McVie and attended Walpole Grammar School. He says that he did have a sister, but she died when she was very young.[1] John McVie started playing the trumpet at an early age then at age 14, McVie began playing the guitar in local bands, covering songs by The Shadows.[2] He soon realised that his friends were learning lead guitar so he decided to play the bass guitar instead. Initially he just removed the bottom two (E and B) strings from his guitar to play the bass parts until his father bought him a pink Fender bass guitar,[2] the same as that used by McVie's major early musical influence Jet Harris, The Shadows' bass player. McVie was in 3J class with Roger Warwick, a baritone sax player who had studied under Don Rendell and was to emerge in the London rock-jazz scene. Their teacher, Mr Howell (a pianist), although not really appreciating this "funny" music, was intelligent and open-minded enough to give pupils space and time to use school facilities to practise and listen to the new wave.

Soon after leaving school at 17, McVie trained for 9 months to be a tax inspector. This coincided with the start of his musical career.[3]

Career

McVie's first experience making music with a group of like minds was in the back room of a house in Lammas Park Road, Ealing with his long term friends John and Peter Barnes who later went on to form a group called The Strangers with friends Tony Wells and Ken Pollendine performing Shadows covers.

McVie's first job as a bass player was in a band called the Krewsaders, formed by boys living in the same street as McVie in Ealing, West London. The Krewsaders played mainly at weddings and parties, covering songs from The Shadows.[4]

John Mayall's Bluesbreakers

Around the time of McVie's tenure as a tax inspector, John Mayall began forming a Chicago-style blues band, John Mayall's Bluesbreakers. Initially Mayall wanted to recruit bass player Cliff Barton of the Cyril Davies All Stars for the rhythm section of his new band. Barton declined, however, but gave him McVie's phone number, urging Mayall to give the talented young bass player a chance in the Bluesbreakers.[4] Mayall contacted McVie, and asked him to audition for his band. Soon thereafter, McVie got an offer to play bass in the Bluesbreakers. McVie accepted while still holding down his daytime job for a further nine months before becoming a musician full-time.[5] Under Mayall's tutelage, McVie, not having had any formal training in music, learned to play the blues mainly by listening to B.B. King and Willie Dixon records given to him by Mayall. Also John McVie was the bands bassist for four and one-half years. During that time John McVie was being fired and re- hired several times. One of his temporary replacements was Jack Bruce.[4]

Peter Green and Mick Fleetwood

In 1966, a young Peter Green was asked to join Mayall's Bluesbreakers as the band's new lead guitar player, after Eric Clapton, the third guitarist with the band (after Bernie Watson and then Roger Dean), had left. Some time later, after the recording of A Hard Road, drummer Aynsley Dunbar was replaced by Mick Fleetwood. Green, McVie, and Fleetwood quickly forged a strong personal relationship, and when John Mayall gave Green some free studio time for his birthday, Green asked McVie and Fleetwood to join him for a recording session. Produced by Mike Vernon, they recorded three tracks together, "Curly", "Rubber Duck", and an instrumental called "Fleetwood Mac".[6] Later the same year, after having been replaced by Mick Taylor in the Bluesbreakers, Green opted to form his own band, which he called "Fleetwood Mac" after his preferred rhythm section (Fleetwood and McVie). Mick Fleetwood immediately joined Green's new band, having been dismissed earlier from the Bluesbreakers for drunkenness. However, McVie initially was reluctant to join Fleetwood Mac, not wanting to leave the security and well-paid job in the Bluesbreakers, forcing Green to temporarily hire a bassist named Bob Brunning. A few weeks later McVie changed his mind, however, as he felt that The Bluesbreakers musical direction were shifting too much towards jazz, and he joined Fleetwood Mac in September 1967.[7]

Fleetwood Mac

Fleetwood mac johnMcVie 3
McVie with Fleetwood Mac, 18 March 1970

With McVie now in Fleetwood Mac, the band recorded its first album, the eponymous Fleetwood Mac in the following months. The album was released in February 1968, and became an immediate national hit, establishing Fleetwood Mac as a major part in the English Blues movement.[2] Fleetwood Mac started playing live gigs in blues clubs and pubs throughout England, and became a household name in the national blues circuit. In the next three years, the band scored a string of hits in the UK and also enjoyed success in continental Europe.

Christine Perfect

While on tour, Fleetwood Mac would often share venues with fellow blues band Chicken Shack. It was on one such occasion that McVie met his future wife, the lead singer and piano player of Chicken Shack, Christine Perfect. Following a brief romance of, it has been said, only two weeks, McVie and Perfect got married with Peter Green as best man. With the couple being unable to spend much time together because of the constant touring with their bands, Christine (now McVie) quit Chicken Shack to become a housewife to spend more time with John.[8] However, following the departure of Peter Green from Fleetwood Mac in 1970, McVie successfully persuaded Christine to join him in Fleetwood Mac.

International success and personal life

JohnMcVie
McVie live with Fleetwood Mac on 3 March 2009 in St. Paul, Minnesota.

After 1970, Fleetwood Mac went through several different line-ups, which occasionally became the source of friction and unease within the band. In addition, frequent touring as well as his heavy drinking began to put some strain on his marriage to Christine. In 1974, the McVies, along with the other members of Fleetwood Mac, moved to Los Angeles, where they lived briefly with John Mayall.[9] In 1975, Fleetwood Mac achieved enormous worldwide success after recruiting American singer-songwriter duo Stevie Nicks and Lindsey Buckingham. However, on the heels of the band's success followed serious marital problems for the McVies, and in 1976, during the recording of Rumours, John and Christine McVie's marriage unravelled and the couple divorced the same year. As a way to put behind the hurt and final dissolution, several of Christine's songs on this album were about John McVie, particularly "Don't Stop".[10] John McVie remarried in 1978 to Julie Ann Reubens, but still continued to drink heavily.

In 1981, McVie agreed to go on the road with the Bluesbreakers again for their reunion tour with John Mayall, Mick Taylor, and Colin Allen. During 1982 the band toured America, Asia and Australia (John McVie did not take part in the European Tour in 1983 and was replaced by Steve Thompson).

An alcohol-induced seizure in 1987 finally prompted McVie to stop drinking altogether and he has been sober ever since. In 1989, McVie's wife Julie Ann gave birth to their first child, a daughter, Molly Elizabeth McVie. In his spare time, McVie is a sailing enthusiast, and he nearly got lost at least once on a Pacific voyage.[2] A naturally reclusive man, his involvement with Fleetwood Mac has been constant but notably low-key, despite the fact that the band takes the "Mac" part of its name from him.

On 27 October 2013, Fleetwood Mac announced on their Facebook Page that McVie had been diagnosed with colon cancer and would be undergoing treatment.[11] He continued to play with the band during their 2014 On With The Show tour following an improvement in his condition. In 2017, it was revealed that McVie's colon cancer was completely cleared.[12]

Discography

With Fleetwood Mac

Year Album US UK Additional information
1968 Fleetwood Mac 198 4 Plays bass on all tracks except "Long Grey Mare"
1968 Mr. Wonderful - 10 -
1969 Then Play On 192 6 credited for the instrumental "Searching For Madge"
1970 Kiln House 69 39 co-wrote "Station Man" and "Jewel Eyed Judy"
1971 Future Games 91 - -
1972 Bare Trees 70 - The cover photo was taken by McVie
1973 Penguin 49 - Plays bass on all tracks except "Revelation" and "The Derelict"
1973 Mystery to Me 68 - co-wrote "Forever"
1974 Heroes Are Hard to Find 34 - -
1975 Fleetwood Mac 1 23 Appears on album cover with Mick Fleetwood
1977 Rumours 1 1 Co-Wrote "The Chain"
1979 Tusk 4 1
1980 Live 14 31 -
1982 Mirage 1 5 Backing vocals on Gypsy B-Side "Cool Water"
1987 Tango in the Night 7 1 -
1988 Greatest Hits 14 3 -
1990 Behind the Mask 18 1 -
1995 Time - 47 -
1997 The Dance 1 15 featured on background vocals on "Say You Love Me"
2003 Say You Will 3 6

With John Mayall's Bluesbreakers

Year Album US UK Additional information
1965 John Mayall Plays John Mayall - - Live at Klooks Kleek
1966 Blues Breakers with Eric Clapton - 6 -
1967 A Hard Road - 10 -
1967 Crusade - 8 -

Solo albums

Year Album US UK Additional information
1992 John McVie's "Gotta Band" with Lola Thomas - - -

With Lindsey Buckingham and Christine McVie

Year Album U.S. Billboard 200 UK Albums Chart Additional information
2017 Lindsey Buckingham/Christine McVie 17 5

Songwriting credits for Fleetwood Mac

Year Song Netherlands Singles Chart U.S. Mainstream Rock
1969 "Searching For Madge" (John McVie)
-
-
1970 (1985) "On We Jam" (McVie, Jeremy Spencer, Danny Kirwan, Peter Green, Mick Fleetwood)
-
-
1970 "Station Man" (McVie, Spencer, Kirwan)
-
-
1970 "Jewel-Eyed Judy" (McVie, Fleetwood, Kirwan)
-
1971 "The Purple Dancer" (McVie, Kirwan, Fleetwood)
-
-
1971 "What A Shame" (McVie, Fleetwood, Kirwan, Christine McVie, Bob Welch)
-
-
1973 "Forever" (McVie, Bob Weston, Welch)
-
-
1975 (2004) "Jam No.2" (McVie, Fleetwood, C. McVie, Lindsey Buckingham)
-
-
1977 "The Chain" (McVie, Fleetwood, Buckingham, Stevie Nicks, C. McVie)
-
30
1977 (2004) "For Duster (The Blues)" (McVie, Fleetwood, Buckingham, C. McVie)
-
-
1995 "Winds of Change" (McVie, Fleetwood, Kit Hain)
-
-

References

  1. ^ "John McVie Q&A Session, Part 2; January 2006". Fleetwoodmac.net. Retrieved 5 September 2016.
  2. ^ a b c d Mick Fleetwood (1990). Fleetwood–My Life and Adventures with Fleetwood Mac. Sidgwick & Jackson Ltd. ISBN 0-283-06126-X.
  3. ^ Martin E. Adelson. "John McVie". Fleetwoodmac.net. Retrieved 5 September 2016.
  4. ^ a b c "De Gitarist (04/1998), Fleetwood Mac's John McVie didn't stop Blue Letter Archives. URL last accessed 2007-02-20"
  5. ^ "John McVie Q&A", The Penguin. URL last accessed 20 February 2007
  6. ^ "Insight BBC Interview". Fmlegacy.com. Archived from the original on 7 September 2008. Retrieved 18 July 2011.
  7. ^ "Bassplayer (05/06/195), A life with Fleetwood Mac – John McVie", Blue Letter Archives. Currently is playing in a country band in Tuscaloosa Alabama. URL last accessed 20 February 2007
  8. ^ "Melody Maker (05/24/1969) No Domestic Oblivion For Christine", Blue Letter Archives. URL last accessed 20 February 2007
  9. ^ "Rolling Stone (06/07/1984), From British blues with Chicken Shack to soft rock with Fleetwood Mac", Blue Letter Archives. URL last accessed 20 February 2007
  10. ^ Brunning, Bob .(2001). Rumours And Lies: The Fleetwood Mac Story. ISBN 978-1-84449-011-0. Retrieved 2 January 2007.
  11. ^ "Security Check Required". Facebook.com. Retrieved 5 September 2016.
  12. ^ Dingwall, John. "Fleetwood Mac's Mick reveals pride over Scots roots but claims band dreaded drive to Scotland in clapped-out bus". The Scottish Sun. Retrieved April 4, 2017.

External links

An Evening with Fleetwood Mac

An Evening with Fleetwood Mac is an ongoing concert tour by British-American rock band Fleetwood Mac. The tour's lineup consists of Stevie Nicks, Christine McVie, Mick Fleetwood, John McVie, Mike Campbell and Neil Finn. The tour marks the first tour with the band for Campbell and Finn, and the first tour without Lindsey Buckingham since the Another Link in the Chain Tour (1994–1995). The tour began on October 3, 2018, at the BOK Center in Tulsa, Oklahoma, and is scheduled to conclude in September, 2019.

Bare Trees

Bare Trees is the sixth studio album by British-American rock band Fleetwood Mac, released in March 1972. This is their last album to feature Danny Kirwan, who was fired during the album's supporting tour. In the wake of the band's success in the mid-1970s, Bare Trees peaked at No. 70 and achieved Gold status in 1976 and certified platinum in 1988 for selling over a million copies.

Behind the Mask (album)

Behind the Mask is the fifteenth studio album by British-American rock band Fleetwood Mac, released in 1990. It was the first album released by the band after the departure of guitarist Lindsey Buckingham. He was replaced by Billy Burnette and Rick Vito, both guitar players, singers and songwriters. Fleetwood Mac thus became a six-piece band with four singer/songwriters. The album was not as successful as its predecessor, Tango in the Night, nor did it spawn any big hit singles although "Save Me" made the US Top 40, while "Love Is Dangerous" and "Skies the Limit" enjoyed some airplay. "Save Me" and "Skies the Limit" were much more successful in Canada, where they both reached the Top 30. Though it barely reached the US Top 20, the album entered the UK Albums Chart at number 1 and achieved platinum status there. Following the album's release and subsequent world tour, bandmembers Stevie Nicks and Rick Vito left the band, though Nicks would rejoin in 1997.

The cover for the album was created by photographer Dave Gorton. He stated that the band did not wish to appear on the front cover of the album and Mick Fleetwood himself suggested that he create an image that "spiritually symbolised" the band instead. The album cover earned a Grammy nomination in 1991 for "Best Album Package".

The song Freedom was written by Stevie Nicks with Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers guitarist Mike Campbell. Campbell would join Fleetwood Mac in 2018.

Christine McVie

Christine Anne Perfect (born 12 July 1943), known professionally as Christine McVie following her marriage to John McVie, is an English singer, songwriter and keyboardist, best known as one of the three lead vocalists and the keyboardist of Fleetwood Mac. She joined the band in 1970. She has also released three solo albums. McVie is known for her smoky, alto vocals and her direct but poignant lyrics, which concentrated on love and relationships. AllMusic describes her as an "Unabashedly easy-on-the-ears singer/songwriter, and the prime mover behind some of Fleetwood Mac's biggest hits." Eight of her songs appeared on Fleetwood Mac's 1988 Greatest Hits album.In 1998 McVie was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame as a member of Fleetwood Mac and received the Brit Award for Outstanding Contribution to Music. The same year, after almost 30 years with the band, she opted to leave and lived in semi-retirement for nearly 15 years. McVie released one solo album in 2004. In September 2013, McVie appeared on stage with Fleetwood Mac at London's O2 Arena. She rejoined the band in October 2014, ready for Fleetwood Mac's On with the Show tour.In 2014 she received the Ivor Novello Award for Lifetime Achievement from the British Academy of Songwriters, Composers and Authors.

Fleetwood Mac

Fleetwood Mac are a British-American rock band, formed in London in 1967. They have sold more than 100 million records worldwide, making them one of the world's best-selling bands. In 1998, select members of Fleetwood Mac were inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and received the Brit Award for Outstanding Contribution to Music. In 2018, the band was declared MusiCares Person of the Year.Fleetwood Mac were founded by guitarist Peter Green, drummer Mick Fleetwood and guitarist Jeremy Spencer. Bassist John McVie completed the lineup for their self-titled debut album. Danny Kirwan joined as a third guitarist in 1968. Keyboardist Christine Perfect, who contributed as a session musician from the second album, married McVie and joined in 1970. At this time the band was primarily a British blues outfit, scoring a UK number one with "Albatross", and had lesser hits with the singles "Oh Well" and "Black Magic Woman". All three guitarists left in succession during the early 1970s, to be replaced by guitarists Bob Welch and Bob Weston and vocalist Dave Walker. By 1974, all three had departed, leaving the band without a male lead vocalist or guitarist.

In late 1974, while Fleetwood was scouting studios in Los Angeles, he was introduced to folk-rock duo Lindsey Buckingham and Stevie Nicks. Fleetwood Mac soon asked Buckingham to be their new lead guitarist, and Buckingham agreed on condition that Nicks would also join the band. The addition of Buckingham and Nicks gave the band a more pop rock sound, and their 1975 self-titled album, Fleetwood Mac, reached No. 1 in the U.S. Rumours (1977), Fleetwood Mac's second album after the arrival of Buckingham and Nicks, produced four U.S. Top 10 singles and remained at number one on the American albums chart for 31 weeks. It also reached the top spot in various countries around the world. Rumours has sold over 40 million copies worldwide, making it the eighth-highest-selling album in history. The band went through personal turmoil while recording the album as both the romantic partnerships in the band (John & Christine McVie and Buckingham & Nicks) separated, although they continued making music together.

The line-up remained stable through three more studio albums, but by the late 1980s began to disintegrate. The first to leave was Buckingham, followed by Nicks in 1991, to be replaced by a series of short-term guitarists and vocalists. In 1993, a one-off performance for the first inauguration of Bill Clinton featured the five central members back together for the first time in six years, and in 1997 a full reunion occurred. In 1998 Christine McVie retired from touring. The band stayed together as a four-piece consisting of John McVie, Mick Fleetwood, Lindsey Buckingham and Stevie Nicks. In 2014 Christine McVie rejoined full-time. The latest studio album by the band was 2003's Say You Will. A side project known as Lindsey Buckingham Christine McVie was released in 2017, containing contributions from the other band members except Nicks. In 2018, Buckingham was fired from the band, and was replaced by Mike Campbell, formerly of Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers, and Neil Finn of Split Enz and Crowded House.

Fleetwood Mac (1975 album)

Fleetwood Mac is the tenth studio album by British-American rock band Fleetwood Mac, released in July 1975 by Reprise Records. It was the band's second eponymous album, the first being their 1968 debut album. Among Fleetwood Mac fans, the album is often referred to as The White Album. This is the first Fleetwood Mac album to feature Lindsey Buckingham as guitarist and Stevie Nicks as vocalist, after Bob Welch departed the band in late 1974. The album was also the band's last to be released on the Reprise label until 1997's The Dance (the band's subsequent albums until then were released through Warner Bros. Records, Reprise's parent company).

The album reached number one on the Billboard 200 over a year after entering the chart, spent 37 weeks within the top 10, and more than fifteen months within the top 40. It was the second biggest album of 1976 (behind Frampton Comes Alive! by Peter Frampton) and the tenth biggest album of 1977. It launched three top twenty singles: "Over My Head", "Rhiannon" and "Say You Love Me", the last two falling just short of the top ten, both at No. 11. In 1986, it was certified 7x platinum by the RIAA representing shipments of seven million units in the United States."Warm Ways" was the first single lifted from the album in 1975 in the UK. It was not released as a single in the United States, where "Over My Head" was released instead. Initially, the album generated limited interest in the UK, as the first three singles released by the new lineup failed to chart. "Say You Love Me" charted on the UK Singles Chart and it reached No. 40 Following the massive success of Rumours two years later, interest in the band re-ignited and Fleetwood Mac was re-released in 1978, along with the single "Rhiannon" which peaked just outside the Top 40 at No. 46. The album eventually peaked at No. 23 on the UK Albums Chart but was a prelude to a run of hugely successful albums for the band in Britain, including four number ones: Rumours, Tusk, Tango in the Night and Behind the Mask.A live version of "Landslide" was eventually released as a single in the US in 1998 after it became one of the most popular tracks from the live reunion album The Dance. It reached No. 51 on the Billboard Hot 100.

Future Games

Future Games is the fifth studio album by British-American rock band Fleetwood Mac, released on 3 September 1971. It was recorded in the summer of 1971 at Advision Studios in London and was the first album to feature Christine McVie as a full member. This album was also the first of five albums to feature American guitarist Bob Welch. “He was totally different background – R&B, sort of jazzy. He brought his personality,” Mick Fleetwood said of Welch in a 1995 BBC interview. “He was a member of Fleetwood Mac before we’d even played a note.” Without the 1950s leanings of departed guitarist Jeremy Spencer, the band moved further away from blues and closer to the melodic pop sound that would finally break them into America four years later. After the band completed the album and turned it in, the record label said that it would not release an album with only seven songs, and demanded that they record an eighth. "What a Shame" was recorded hastily as a jam to fulfill this request.

Greatest Hits (1971 Fleetwood Mac album)

Greatest Hits was the first hits compilation package from the British blues rock band Fleetwood Mac, covering the period from the band's beginning in 1968 to 1971, mostly in its original incarnation led by guitarist Peter Green. Part of the second British blues boom of the late 1960s, Fleetwood Mac enjoyed several hit singles in the UK, collated here for this album issued on CBS Records only in the UK, but available in the US as an import.

The single "Black Magic Woman" received exposure in the US via a cover by the San Francisco group Santana, who placed their version in the Billboard Top 40.

Long out of print, it was replaced on compact disc by the 2002 compilation The Best of Peter Green's Fleetwood Mac on the Sony International label, which now owns the Columbia/CBS catalogue. It was reissued on vinyl in 2010, however.

A very similar release with the same title and same cover was released by Sony BMG in 1989, but consisted of the tracks from The Pious Bird of Good Omen plus "Shake Your Moneymaker" and "Love That Burns". (This should not be confused with the identically-titled but entirely different 1988 "Greatest Hits" album, which concentrates exclusively on post-1975 material and has no tracks in common with the 1971 "Greatest Hits" nor the aforementioned variant.)

The album gatefold shows a full-size photo of the post-Green line up of the band with Christine McVie (née Perfect), even though she just plays piano on a couple of tracks and was not a full member until after Kiln House was released.

"The Green Manalishi", "Oh Well", "Rattlesnake Shake", and "Dragonfly" were licensed from Warner (then Kinney) and "Man of the World" from Immediate; the others were on Blue Horizon originally.

Heroes Are Hard to Find

Heroes Are Hard to Find is the ninth studio album by British-American rock band Fleetwood Mac, released on 13 September 1974. This is the last album with Bob Welch, who left at the end of 1974, and was replaced by Lindsey Buckingham and Stevie Nicks. It was the first Fleetwood Mac studio album properly recorded in the US as well as the first to enter the top 40 of the Billboard 200 album chart. The title track was edited and issued as a single but it failed to chart.

Bob Welch would re-record Angel, Bermuda Triangle, and Silver Heels for His Fleetwood Mac Years & Beyond (2003). A re-write of Silver Heels, entitled Hustler with explicit lyrics appeared on Bob Welch Looks at Bop (1999).

Kiln House

Kiln House is the fourth studio album by British blues rock band Fleetwood Mac, released on 18 September 1970 by Reprise Records. This is the first of the post-Peter Green Fleetwood Mac albums, and their last album to feature Jeremy Spencer. Christine McVie was present at the recording sessions and contributed backing vocals, keyboards and cover art, although she was not a full member of the band until shortly after the album's completion.

Live (Fleetwood Mac album)

Live is a double live album released by British-American rock band Fleetwood Mac in 1980. It was the first live album from the then-current line-up of the band, and the next would be The Dance from 1997. The album was certified gold (500,000 copies sold) by the RIAA in November 1981.Live consists of recordings taken primarily from the 1979-1980 Tusk Tour, together with a few from the earlier Rumours Tour of 1977. Two songs were recorded at a Paris soundcheck and three at a performance at Santa Monica Civic Auditorium "for an audience of friends and road crew."

Of particular note are three new songs - Christine McVie's "One More Night", Stevie Nicks' "Fireflies", and a well-harmonized backstage rendition of The Beach Boys' "The Farmer's Daughter". The latter two were released as singles; "Fireflies" reached the top 60 in the US, while "The Farmer's Daughter" reached the top 10 in Austria. "Fireflies" was Nicks' rumination on the tumultuous recording of the "Tusk" album and her observance that the band stayed intact nevertheless. Her lyrics referred to band members as the "five fireflies." "Don't Let Me Down Again" is a song from the Buckingham Nicks album. Also notable are two Lindsey Buckingham guitar showcases. The first, "I'm So Afraid", was popular as a concert finale during this period. The second was Buckingham's take on former Mac guitarist Peter Green's signature number, "Oh Well" (originally a 1969 single release).

Mirage (Fleetwood Mac album)

Mirage is the 13th studio album by British-American rock band Fleetwood Mac, released on June 18, 1982. This studio effort's soft rock sound stood in stark contrast to its more experimental predecessor, 1979's Tusk. Mirage yielded several hit singles: "Hold Me" (which peaked at #4 on the US Billboard Pop Chart, remaining there for seven weeks), "Gypsy" (#12 US Pop Chart), "Love in Store" (#22 US Pop Chart), "Oh Diane" (which reached #9 in the UK), and "Can't Go Back" (issued on 7" and 12" in the UK).

Mystery to Me

Mystery to Me is the eighth studio album by British-American rock band Fleetwood Mac, released on 15 October 1973. This was their last album to feature Bob Weston. Most of the songs were penned by guitarist/singer Bob Welch and keyboardist/singer Christine McVie, who were instrumental in gearing the band toward the radio-friendly pop rock that would make them successful a few years later. Although Mystery to Me sold moderately and produced no hit singles, "Hypnotized" became an American FM radio staple for many years. In the wake of the Buckingham/Nicks-led line-up's success a few years later, the album achieved a RIAA gold certification in the United States in 1976.

Penguin (album)

Penguin is the seventh studio album by British-American rock band Fleetwood Mac, released in March 1973. It was the first Fleetwood Mac album after the departure of Danny Kirwan, the first to feature Bob Weston and the only one to feature Dave Walker.

The penguin is the band mascot favoured by John McVie. His fascination with the birds originated from when he lived near London Zoo during the early days of his marriage to Christine McVie. He was a member of the Zoological Society and would spend hours at the zoo studying and watching the penguins.

Rumours (album)

Rumours is the eleventh studio album by English-American rock band Fleetwood Mac, released on 4 February 1977 by Warner Bros. Records. Largely recorded in California in 1976, it was produced by the band with Ken Caillat and Richard Dashut. The band wanted to expand on the commercial success of their eponymous 1975 album, but struggled with relationship breakups before recording started. The Rumours studio sessions were marked by hedonistic behaviour and interpersonal strife among band members, which shaped the album's lyrics.

Recorded with the intention of making "a pop album", the album's music featured a pop rock and soft rock sound characterized by accented rhythms and electric keyboards such as the Fender Rhodes or Hammond B3 organ. The members partied and used cocaine for much of the recording sessions, and its completion was delayed by its mixing process, but was finished by the end of 1976. Following the album's release, Fleetwood Mac undertook worldwide promotional tours. Rumours reached the top of both the US Billboard 200 and the United Kingdom Albums Chart, and became the band's most successful release. The songs "Go Your Own Way", "Dreams", "Don't Stop", and "You Make Loving Fun" were released as singles, all of which reached the US top 10.

Having won the Grammy Award for Album of the Year in 1978, Rumours has since sold over 40 million copies worldwide, making it one of the best-selling albums of all time, and has received diamond certifications in several countries, including the United States, Canada, and Australia. The album garnered widespread acclaim from critics, with praise centred on its production quality and harmonies, which frequently relied on the interplay among three vocalists and has inspired the work of musical acts in different genres.

Often considered Fleetwood Mac's best release, it has featured in several publications' lists of the best albums of the 1970s and of all time. In 2004, Rumours was remastered and reissued with the addition of "Silver Springs", which had been excluded from the original due to tension within the band, and a bonus CD of outtakes from the recording sessions. In 2018, the album was selected for preservation in the National Recording Registry, being deemed "culturally, historically, or artistically significant" by the Library of Congress.

The 1982 Reunion Concert

The 1982 Reunion Concert is a live album from a concert by British Bluesman John Mayall. His sidemen are Mick Taylor on guitar, John McVie on bass and Colin Allen on drums. The concert took place at the Wax Museum, Washington DC, on 17 June 1982. It was released in 1994 by Repertoire Records as a CD credited to John Mayall and the Bluesbreakers.

During the first two decades of his career John Mayall has been constantly experimenting with band formats and various musicians. In 1982 he teamed up with three musicians from his previous line-ups and toured briefly in America and Australia. At that time all of them were residing in the USA. Mick Taylor had left the Rolling Stones and was pursuing a solo career. John McVie had taken time off from his band Fleetwood Mac. Colin Allen, after disbanding Stone the Crows, had been a member of Focus. There is no evidence of studio recordings with this personnel, but another live performance with guest bluesmen (Albert King, Buddy Guy, Sippie Wallace, Junior Wells etc.) has been released on video as Blues Alive. For contractual reasons John Mayall did not release any new material during the first half of the 1980s. The CD and the video both appeared in the early 1990s, when Mayall had regained some of his popularity with a new incarnation of his 'Bluesbreakers'. More recordings from the tour were released in 2011.

The Chain

"The Chain" is a song by the British-American rock band Fleetwood Mac, released on their critically acclaimed, best-selling album Rumours. It is the only song from the album credited to all five members (Stevie Nicks, Lindsey Buckingham, Christine McVie, John McVie, and Mick Fleetwood).

"The Chain" was created from combinations of several previously rejected materials, including solo work by Buckingham, Nicks and Christine McVie. It was assembled, often manually by splicing tapes with a razor blade, at the Record Plant in Sausalito, California, with hired engineers Ken Caillat and Richard Dashut.Following the critical and commercial success of Rumours, "The Chain" has become a staple of the band's live shows, typically the opening song. It was featured as the opening track on The Dance, a 1997 live concert CD/DVD release, as well as several greatest hits compilations. It has attained particular fame in the United Kingdom, where the instrumental section is used as the theme tune for the BBC and Channel 4's television coverage of Formula One.

Then Play On

Then Play On is the third studio album by British blues rock band Fleetwood Mac, released on 19 September 1969. It was the first of their original albums to feature Danny Kirwan and the last with Peter Green. Jeremy Spencer did not feature on the album apart from "a couple of piano things" (according to Mick Fleetwood in Q magazine in 1990). The album, appearing after the group's sudden success in the pop charts, offered a broader stylistic range than the classic blues of the group's first two albums. The album went on to reach #6 in the UK, subsequently becoming the band's fourth Top 20 hit in a row, as well as their third album to reach the Top 10. The title is taken from the opening line of William Shakespeare's play Twelfth Night — "If music be the food of love, play on".

This was the band's first release with Warner/Reprise after being lured away from Blue Horizon and a one-off with Immediate Records. All subsequent Fleetwood Mac albums have been released on Warner. The album, which at its original UK release had an unusually long running time, has been released with four different song line-ups. The original CD compiled all songs from the two US LP versions, both of which omitted tracks from the original UK version. In August 2013, a remastered edition of the album was reissued on vinyl and CD, restoring its original 1969 UK track listing. This version reached No. 112 on the UK Albums chart.

Time (Fleetwood Mac album)

Time is the 16th studio album by British-American rock band Fleetwood Mac, released in 1995. This album features a unique line-up for the band featuring the addition of former Traffic guitarist Dave Mason and country vocalist Bekka Bramlett (daughter of Delaney and Bonnie). Lindsey Buckingham, who had left Fleetwood Mac in 1987, makes an appearance as a backing vocalist on one track, but Time is the first and only Fleetwood Mac album since 1974's Heroes Are Hard to Find not to feature any contribution from Stevie Nicks.

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