John Mackey Award

The John Mackey Award is presented annually to college football's most outstanding tight end. Established in 2000 by the Nassau County Sports Commission,[1] the award is given annually to the tight end who best exemplifies the play, sportsmanship, academics, and community values of Pro Football Hall of Fame tight end John Mackey.

The winner is chosen by a selection committee comprising sportswriters and former players, including Lee Corso, Phil Steele, Charles Arbuckle, and former John Mackey Award winners Tim Stratton, Dallas Clark, and D. J. Williams, among others.[2] The award is a member of the National College Football Awards Association, which encompasses college football's most prestigious awards.[3] Former Florida State tight end Nick O'Leary called the award one which "all tight ends dream of winning".[4]

John Mackey Award
Given forCollege football's most outstanding tight end
CountryUnited States
History
First award2000
Most recentT.J. Hockenson, Iowa
Websitehttp://www.johnmackeyaward.com

Winners

Year Winner School Ref
2000 Tim Stratton Purdue [1]
2001 Daniel Graham Colorado [5]
2002 Dallas Clark Iowa [6]
2003 Kellen Winslow II Miami (FL) [7]
2004 Heath Miller Virginia [8]
2005 Marcedes Lewis UCLA [9]
2006 Matt Spaeth Minnesota [10]
2007 Fred Davis USC [11]
2008 Chase Coffman Missouri [12]
2009 Aaron Hernandez Florida [13]
2010 D. J. Williams Arkansas [14]
2011 Dwayne Allen Clemson [15]
2012 Tyler Eifert Notre Dame [16]
2013 Austin Seferian-Jenkins Washington [17]
2014 Nick O'Leary Florida State [4]
2015 Hunter Henry Arkansas [18]
2016 Jake Butt Michigan [19]
2017 Mark Andrews Oklahoma [20]
2018 T.J. Hockenson Iowa [21]

References

General
  • "John Mackey Award Winners". Sports Reference. Retrieved April 27, 2017.
Footnotes
  1. ^ a b "Stratton wins John Mackey Award". United Press International. December 4, 2000. Retrieved April 27, 2017.
  2. ^ "John Mackey Award Selection Committee". johnmackeyaward.com. Friends of John Mackey. Retrieved April 27, 2017.
  3. ^ "College football: 2016 Outland Trophy watch list announced". NCAA.com. July 8, 2016. Retrieved April 12, 2017.
  4. ^ a b Hinnen, Jerry (December 10, 2014). "Florida State's Nick O'Leary wins Mackey Award as top tight end". CBS Sports. Retrieved April 27, 2017.
  5. ^ Kruck, Ron (December 12, 2001). "Daniel Graham Wins Mackey Award". Scout.com. Retrieved April 27, 2017.
  6. ^ "Brief: Iowa tight end Clark wins Mackey Award". Amarillo Globe-News. Associated Press. December 12, 2002. Retrieved April 27, 2017.
  7. ^ "Miami's Winslow wins Mackey Award". Athens Banner-Herald. December 11, 2003. Retrieved April 27, 2017.
  8. ^ "Mackey Award goes to Virginia tight end". United Press International. December 9, 2004. Retrieved April 27, 2017.
  9. ^ "UCLAs Lewis wins Mackey Award". The Orange County Register. December 6, 2005. Retrieved April 27, 2017.
  10. ^ "Spaeth wins Mackey Award". St. Paul Pioneer Press. December 8, 2006. Retrieved April 27, 2017.
  11. ^ "Rogers grad Davis wins Mackey Award". Toledo Blade. December 7, 2007. Retrieved April 27, 2017.
  12. ^ Matter, Dave (December 12, 2008). "Coffman wins Mackey". Columbia Daily Tribune. Retrieved April 27, 2017.
  13. ^ "Florida Gators Maurkice Pouncey and Aaron Hernandez win national awards". Miami Herald. December 12, 2009. Retrieved April 27, 2017.
  14. ^ Low, Chris (December 9, 2010). "Hogs' D.J. Williams wins Mackey Award". ESPN.com. Retrieved April 27, 2017.
  15. ^ "Clemson's Allen wins John Mackey Award". Fox News. December 8, 2011. Retrieved April 27, 2017.
  16. ^ "Notre Dame's Tyler Eifert wins Mackey Award". Sports Illustrated. Associated Press. December 5, 2012. Retrieved April 27, 2017.
  17. ^ Jude, Adam (December 11, 2013). "UW's Austin Seferian-Jenkins wins John Mackey Award as nation's top tight end". The Seattle Times. Retrieved April 27, 2017.
  18. ^ "Hunter Henry wins Mackey Award given to the nation's best TE". Fox Sports. December 9, 2015. Retrieved April 27, 2017.
  19. ^ Snyder, Mark (December 7, 2016). "Wolverines' Jake Butt wins Mackey Award as top tight end". Detroit Free Press. Retrieved April 27, 2017.
  20. ^ Stacy, Kelli (December 7, 2017). "Oklahoma football: Mark Andrews wins John Mackey". OU Daily. Retrieved December 6, 2017.
  21. ^ Elchlepp, Kimberly. "Notre Dame Head Coach Brian Kelly Winner of The Home Depot Coach of The Year Award; Iowa's T.J. Hockenson Named the 2018 John Mackey Award Recipient".

External links

Chase Coffman

Chase Allen Coffman (born November 10, 1986) is a former American football tight end. He played college football for the University of Missouri, earned consensus All-American honors, and was recognized as the best college tight end in the country. He was chosen by the Cincinnati Bengals in the third round of the 2009 NFL Draft.

D. J. Williams (tight end)

David Edward "D. J." Williams Jr (born September 10, 1988) is a former American football tight end. He was drafted by the Green Bay Packers out of University of Arkansas in the fifth round (141st pick overall) in the 2011 NFL Draft.

Dallas Clark

Dallas Dean Clark (born June 12, 1979) is a former American football tight end who played 11 seasons in the National Football League (NFL). He played college football for the University of Iowa, earned unanimous All-American honors, and was recognized as the top college tight end in the nation. He was drafted by the Indianapolis Colts in the first round of the 2003 NFL Draft and he was a member of their Super Bowl XLI championship team against the Chicago Bears. He also played for the Tampa Bay Buccaneers and the Baltimore Ravens.

Dalton Schultz

Dalton Chase Schultz (born July 11, 1996) is an American football tight end for the Dallas Cowboys of the National Football League (NFL). He played college football at Stanford University.

Daniel Graham

Daniel Lawrence Graham (born November 16, 1978) is a former American football tight end in the National Football League (NFL). He played college football for the University of Colorado, and was recognized as a consensus All-American. He was drafted by the New England Patriots in the first round of the 2002 NFL Draft, and also played professionally for the Denver Broncos, Tennessee Titans and New Orleans Saints.

Dwayne Allen

Dwayne Lamont Allen (born February 24, 1990) is an American football tight end for the Miami Dolphins of the National Football League (NFL). He played college football for Clemson University, earned consensus All-American honors, and was recognized as the most outstanding college tight end in 2011. He was selected by the Indianapolis Colts in the third round of the 2012 NFL Draft. With the New England Patriots, he won Super Bowl LIII over the Los Angeles Rams.

Heath Miller

Earl Heath Miller Jr. (born October 22, 1982) is a former American football tight end who played professionally for the Pittsburgh Steelers of the National Football League (NFL) for 11 seasons from 2005 to 2015. Miller played college football for the University of Virginia, where he earned All-American honors and won the John Mackey Award. The Steelers selected him in the first round with the 30th overall pick of the 2005 NFL Draft.

Hunter Henry

Hunter Mark Henry (born December 7, 1994) is an American football tight end for the Los Angeles Chargers of the National Football League (NFL). He played college football at Arkansas, where he was a consensus All-American and won the John Mackey Award as the top tight end in the nation. He was selected by the then San Diego Chargers in the second round of the 2016 NFL draft with the 35th overall pick.

Jace Sternberger

Jace Evan Sternberger is an American football tight end for the Texas A&M Aggies college football team. As a junior, Sternberger was named a consensus All-American. Prior to his time at Texas A&M, he played football at Northeastern Oklahoma A&M College and the University of Kansas.

Jake Butt

Jonathan Duane "Jake" Butt (born July 11, 1995) is an American football tight end for the Denver Broncos of the National Football League (NFL). He played college football at Michigan. As a junior, he won the Ozzie Newsome Award. He was selected as a first-team All-American and was named Kwalick–Clark Tight End of the Year in both 2015 and 2016. He won the John Mackey Award given to the top tight end in college football and the Senior CLASS Award in 2016.

Kris Wilson (American football)

Kristopher "Kris" Wilson (born August 22, 1981) is a former American football tight end. He was drafted by the Kansas City Chiefs in the second round of the 2004 NFL Draft. He played college football at Pittsburgh. Wilson has also been a member of the Philadelphia Eagles, San Diego Chargers, and Baltimore Ravens.

Marcedes Lewis

Marcedes Alexis Lewis (born May 19, 1984) is an American football tight end for the Green Bay Packers of the National Football League (NFL). He played college football for the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), earned consensus All-American honors, and was recognized as the top college tight end. He was selected by the Jacksonville Jaguars in the first round of the 2006 NFL Draft.

Mark Andrews (American football)

Mark Andrews (born September 6, 1996) is an American football tight end for the Baltimore Ravens of the National Football League (NFL). He played college football at Oklahoma.

Matt Spaeth

Matt Spaeth (born November 24, 1983) is a former American football tight end. He was drafted by the Steelers in the third round of the 2007 NFL Draft and later won Super Bowl XLIII with them against the Arizona Cardinals. He has also played for the Chicago Bears. He played college football at Minnesota.

Spaeth won 2006's John Mackey Award as college football's best tight end.

Nick O'Leary

Nicklaus O'Leary (born August 31, 1992) is an American football tight end for the Miami Dolphins of the National Football League (NFL). He was drafted by the Buffalo Bills in the sixth round of the 2015 NFL Draft. He played college football at Florida State.

Phil Steele

Phil Steele (born c. 1960) is an American sportswriter and analyst who focuses exclusively on college and professional football. He is considered a "highly respected prognosticator" within the sports media. His company, Phil Steele Publications, produces the annual preseason magazine Phil Steele's College Football Preview, which he personally writes in almost its entirety. The first edition was published in 1995. In a comparison of the major preseason college football magazines, ESPN writer Pat Forde said:All the mags have their merits . . . But Phil Steele owns the genre . . . The 46-year-old uses a cookie-cutter layout for every team, and his writing will never be nominated for a Pulitzer. But he does author every two-page team preview himself, and he crams stats, facts and figures into every nook and cranny. The magazine was similarly praised by the News & Observer and Rivals.com. Chris Stassen, owner of football.stassen.com, has tracked the preseason magazines' accuracy since 1993 and rates Phil Steele's as the most accurate in its predictions.. Phil is currently a full-time employee of ESPN writing articles for ESPN+ and appearing on SportsCenter. He continues to produce the "Bible of College Football" which is the Phil Steele College Football preview that is now in its 24th year.

Steele has been a member of the All-America, John Mackey Award, Davey O'Brien Award, Lombardi Award, and the Ted Hendricks Award voting committees.

Ryan Izzo

Ryan Izzo (born December 21, 1995) is an American football tight end for the New England Patriots of the National Football League (NFL). He played college football at Florida State.

T. J. Hockenson

Thomas Hockenson Jr (born July 3, 1997) is an American football tight end for the Detroit Lions of the National Football League (NFL). He played college football for the Iowa Hawkeyes. As a redshirt sophomore in 2018, he was awarded the John Mackey Award as the nation's top tight end in college football.

Tim Stratton

Timothy William Stratton (born July 15, 1979) is a former American football tight end. He played his college football at Purdue University and won the inaugural John Mackey Award in 2000.

Playing for the Purdue Boilermakers from 1998-2001, Stratton was the favorite target of quarterback Drew Brees. He compiled 38 catches for 380 yards (10.0 avg) and 7 touchdowns his freshman year while finishing second nationally among tight ends in all three categories. He was given Honorable Mention All-Big Ten and he was subsequently named to the Sporting News freshman All-American team. He followed up with 49 catches for 593 yards (12.1 avg) and four touchdowns in his sophomore year. While being named First Team All-Big Ten.

His junior year was followed by 56 receptions for 579 yards (10.3 avg) and two touchdowns, being named First Team All-Big Ten, named to the BCS All America Team and winning the inaugural John Mackey Award, given to the nation's top tight end. In his senior year, Stratton caught 47 passes for 423 yards (9.0 avg) and two touchdowns from Kyle Orton, Brees' successor as Boilermaker quarterback. He was named First Team All-Big Ten and becoming just the fourth player in school history to be named First Team All-Big Ten three years in a career. He also finished as a semi-finalist for the John Mackey Award.

By the time Stratton finished his career at Purdue, he was school's all time leader in receptions at 204. He finished 14th on the school's list for touchdowns (15) and finished 20th in yards. His career average of yards per catch was 10.4 yards.

Remembered at Purdue for his "childish energy and immaturity", Stratton nearly got suspended when a fellow student fleeced his helmet while Stratton climbed up the goal post after a come-from-behind win over Michigan.Prior to college, Stratton played at York Community High School in Elmhurst, Illinois while a resident of Oak Brook, Illinois. Stratton was part of coach Joe Tiller's first recruiting class at Purdue. He resides with his wife and children in Chicago.

John Mackey Award winners
Overall trophies
Overall media awards
Positional awards
Other national player awards
All-Americans
Head coaching awards
Assistant coaching awards
Conference awards
Division I FCS awards
Other divisions/associations
Academic, inspirational,
and versatility awards
Service awards
Regional awards
Awards organizations
Halls of fame

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