John I. Taylor

John Irving Taylor (January 14, 1875 – January 26, 1938) owned the Boston Red Sox from 1904 until 1911. He was the son of General Charles H. Taylor, publisher of the Boston Globe. He purchased the team from Henry Killilea on April 19, 1904, with his father Charles serving as a minority owner. In September 1911, the Taylors sold half of the stock in the team to Jimmy McAleer and Robert B. McRoy with McAleer taking over as team president. On December 21, 1913, Joseph Lannin, Frank P. Cooper, and John R. Turner purchased McAleer and McRoy's half of the team with Lannin becoming team president. On May 15, 1914, Lannin bought out all of his partners and became sole owner of the Red Sox.

In later years Taylor lived in Dedham, Massachusetts, and died "after a brief illness" on January 26, 1938, aged 63.[1] He is interred with his wife Daisy in Forest Hills Cemetery in Jamaica Plain, MA.

John Irving Taylor, Red Sox Owner (1904-1911)
John Irving Taylor, former owner of the Boston Red Sox

Notes

  1. ^ "John I. Taylor 3d; Son of Founder of Boston Globe; Once Owned Red Sox." New York Times. January 27, 1938. p. 21
Preceded by
Henry Killilea
Owner of the Boston Red Sox (along with Jimmy McAleer (September 1911 – December 21, 1913) and Joseph Lannin (December 21, 1913 – May 15, 1914)
April 19, 1904 – May 15, 1914
Succeeded by
Joseph Lannin
1905 Boston Americans season

The 1905 Boston Americans season was the fifth season for the professional baseball franchise that later became known as the Boston Red Sox. The Americans finished fourth in the American League (AL) with a record of 78 wins and 74 losses. The team was managed by Jimmy Collins and played its home games at Huntington Avenue Grounds.

1906 Boston Americans season

The 1906 Boston Americans season was the sixth season for the professional baseball franchise that later became known as the Boston Red Sox. The Americans finished last in the eight-team American League (AL) with a record of 49 wins and 105 losses. The team played its home games at Huntington Avenue Grounds.

1907 Boston Americans season

The 1907 Boston Americans season was the seventh season for the professional baseball franchise that later became known as the Boston Red Sox. The Americans finished seventh in the American League (AL) with a record of 59 wins and 90 losses. Including spring training, the team had five different managers during the season. The team played its home games at Huntington Avenue Grounds.

1908 Boston Red Sox season

The 1908 Boston Red Sox season was the eighth season for the Major League Baseball franchise previously known as the Boston Americans. The Red Sox finished fifth in the American League (AL) with a record of 75 wins and 79 losses. The team played its home games at Huntington Avenue Grounds.

1909 Boston Red Sox season

The 1909 Boston Red Sox season was the ninth season in the franchise's Major League Baseball history. The Red Sox finished third in the American League (AL) with a record of 88 wins and 63 losses. The team played its home games at Huntington Avenue Grounds.

1910 Boston Red Sox season

The 1910 Boston Red Sox season was the tenth season in the franchise's Major League Baseball history. The Red Sox finished fourth in the American League (AL) with a record of 81 wins and 72 losses. The team played its home games at Huntington Avenue Grounds.

1911 Boston Red Sox season

The 1911 Boston Red Sox season was the eleventh season in the franchise's Major League Baseball history. The Red Sox finished fourth in the American League (AL) with a record of 78 wins and 75 losses. This was the final season that the team played its home games at Huntington Avenue Grounds, before moving to Fenway Park.

1913 Boston Red Sox season

The 1913 Boston Red Sox season was the thirteenth season in the franchise's Major League Baseball history. The Red Sox finished fourth in the American League (AL) with a record of 79 wins and 71 losses.

1914 Boston Red Sox season

The 1914 Boston Red Sox season was the fourteenth season in the franchise's Major League Baseball history. The Red Sox finished second in the American League (AL) with a record of 91 wins and 62 losses.

Boston Red Sox

The Boston Red Sox are an American professional baseball team based in Boston, Massachusetts. The Red Sox compete in Major League Baseball (MLB) as a member club of the American League (AL) East division. The Red Sox have won nine World Series championships, tied for the third-most of any MLB team, and they have played in 13. Their most recent appearance and win was in 2018. In addition, they won the 1904 American League pennant, but were not able to defend their 1903 World Series championship when the New York Giants refused to participate in the 1904 World Series. Founded in 1901 as one of the American League's eight charter franchises, the Red Sox' home ballpark has been Fenway Park since 1912. The "Red Sox" name was chosen by the team owner, John I. Taylor, circa 1908, following the lead of previous teams that had been known as the "Boston Red Stockings", including the forerunner of the Atlanta Braves.

Boston was a dominant team in the new league, defeating the Pittsburgh Pirates in the first World Series in 1903 and winning four more championships by 1918. However, they then went into one of the longest championship droughts in baseball history, dubbed the "Curse of the Bambino" after its alleged inception due to the Red Sox' sale of Babe Ruth to the rival New York Yankees two years after their world championship in 1918, an 86-year wait before the team's sixth World Championship in 2004. The team's history during that period was punctuated with some of the most memorable moments in World Series history, including Enos Slaughter's "mad dash" in 1946, the "Impossible Dream" of 1967, Carlton Fisk's home run in 1975, and Bill Buckner's error in 1986. Following their victory in the 2018 World Series, they became the first team to win four World Series trophies in the 21st century, with championships in 2004, 2007, 2013 and 2018. Red Sox history has also been marked by the team's intense rivalry with the Yankees, arguably the fiercest and most historic in North American professional sports.The Boston Red Sox are owned by Fenway Sports Group, which also owns Liverpool F.C. of the Premier League in England. The Red Sox are consistently one of the top MLB teams in average road attendance, while the small capacity of Fenway Park prevents them from leading in overall attendance. From May 15, 2003 to April 10, 2013, the Red Sox sold out every home game—a total of 820 games (794 regular season) for a major professional sports record. Both Neil Diamond's "Sweet Caroline", and The Standells's "Dirty Water" have become anthems for the Red Sox.

Boston Red Sox Hall of Fame

The Boston Red Sox Hall of Fame was instituted in 1995 to recognize the careers of former Boston Red Sox baseball players. A 15-member selection committee of Red Sox broadcasters and executives, past and present media personnel, and representatives from The Sports Museum of New England and the BoSox Club are responsible for nominating candidates.

Fenway Sports Group

Fenway Sports Group, LLC (FSG), is an American sports company. It is the parent company of Major League Baseball's Boston Red Sox and Liverpool Football Club, a Premier League soccer team.

FSG was founded in 2001 as New England Sports Ventures (NESV) when John W. Henry joined forces with Tom Werner, Les Otten, The New York Times Company, and other investors to successfully bid for the Red Sox. NESV formally announced its name change to Fenway Sports Group in March 2011.In addition to owning the Red Sox and Liverpool F.C., the Boston-based limited liability company also owns the home stadiums for both teams (Fenway Park and Anfield) and Fenway Sports Management (which in turn owns the Salem Red Sox of the Class A Carolina League, a minor league baseball franchise), plus 80% of the New England Sports Network (NESN) and 50% of Roush Fenway Racing, with cars entered (as of the 2019 season) in the NASCAR Cup Series racing competition.

In an April 2014 article in Forbes, senior editor Kurt Badenhausen called FSG "the most sophisticated, synergistic player in the coming age of international sports conglomerates".

Harry Hooper

Harry Bartholomew Hooper (August 24, 1887 – December 18, 1974) was a Major League Baseball (MLB) right fielder in the early 20th century. Hooper batted left-handed and threw right-handed. Hooper was born in Bell Station, California, and he graduated from St. Mary's College of California. He played for major league teams between 1909 and 1925, spending most of that time with the Boston Red Sox and finishing his career with the Chicago White Sox.

Hooper was often known for his defensive skills and he was among the league leaders in defensive categories such as putouts by a right fielder. During several seasons with Boston, he teamed up with Duffy Lewis and Tris Speaker to form the Golden Outfield, one of the best outfield trios in baseball history. Hooper is also one of only two members of four separate Red Sox World Series championship teams (1912, 1915, 1916, 1918). He was elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1971.

Isaac M. Taylor

For others with the same name, see Isaac Taylor (disambiguation)Isaac Montrose Taylor (June 15, 1921 – November 3, 1996) was the dean of the Medical School of the University of North Carolina from 1964 until 1971. His first marriage to Gertrude Woodard produced five children,James Taylor, the singer and guitarist, and four other children, Alex, Livingston, Hugh, and Kate. Through his second marriage to Suzanne Francis Sheats, he fathered three more children, Andrew Preston (1983), Theodore Haynes (1986), and Julia Rose (1989).

Taylor was born in Morganton, NC. He received his undergraduate degree from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and his MD from Harvard University. He served as the chief resident at Massachusetts General Hospital. He then joined the faculty of the University of North Carolina Medical School before serving as dean for ten years.In 1955, he was drafted by the United States Navy and served in Antarctica as the medical officer for Operation Deep Freeze.

Jimmy Collins

James Joseph Collins (January 16, 1870 – March 6, 1943) was an American professional baseball player. He played fourteen seasons in Major League Baseball. Collins was elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1945.

Collins was especially regarded for his defense. He was best known for his ability to field a bunt—prior to his debut, it was the shortstop who fielded bunts down the third base line—and is regarded as a pioneer of the modern defensive play of a third baseman. As of 2012, he is second all-time in putouts by a third baseman behind Brooks Robinson. At the plate, Collins finished his career with 65 home runs, 1055 runs scored, 983 RBI and a .294 batting average.

Collins was also the first manager of the Boston Red Sox franchise, then known as the Boston Americans. He was the winning manager in the first-ever World Series, as Boston defeated the Pittsburgh Pirates in the 1903 World Series, five games to three.

Jimmy McAleer

James Robert "Loafer" McAleer (July 10, 1864 – April 29, 1931) was an American center fielder, manager, and stockholder in Major League Baseball who assisted in establishing the American League. He spent most of his 13-season playing career with the Cleveland Spiders, and went on to manage the Cleveland Blues, St. Louis Browns, and Washington Senators. Shortly before his retirement, he became a major shareholder in the Boston Red Sox.His career ended abruptly. During his brief tenure as co-owner of the Red Sox, McAleer quarreled with longtime friend and colleague Ban Johnson, president of the American League. In the wake of this disagreement, he sold off his shares in the Red Sox and broke off his relationship with Major League Baseball.McAleer's rift with Johnson, along with his sudden retirement, damaged his professional reputation, and he received little recognition for his contributions to baseball. Today, he is most often remembered for initiating the customary request that the President of the United States throw out the first ball of the season.

Joseph Lannin

Joseph John Lannin (April 23, 1866 – 15 May 1928) was a Canadian-born American baseball entrepreneur.

List of United States Supreme Court cases, volume 56

This is a list of all the United States Supreme Court cases from volume 56 of the United States Reports. This was the 15th volume reported by Benjamin Chew Howard.

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