John Hadl

John Willard Hadl (born February 15, 1940) is a former American football player, a quarterback in the American Football League and National Football League for sixteen seasons, with the San Diego Chargers, Los Angeles Rams, Green Bay Packers, and Houston Oilers. He was an AFL All-Star four times and was selected to two Pro Bowls. Hadl played Collegiately at the University of Kansas, and was elected to the College Football Hall of Fame in 1994.

John Hadl
No. 21, 12
Position:Quarterback
Personal information
Born:February 15, 1940 (age 79)
Lawrence, Kansas
Height:6 ft 1 in (1.85 m)
Weight:214 lb (97 kg)
Career information
High school:Lawrence (KS)
College:Kansas
NFL Draft:1962 / Round: 1 / Pick: 10
AFL draft:1962 / Round: 3 / Pick: 24
Career history
As player:
As coach:
Career highlights and awards
Career NFL statistics
Pass attempts:4,687
Pass completions:2,363
Percentage:50.4
TDINT:244–268
Passing yards:33,503
QB Rating:67.4
Player stats at NFL.com

College career

After playing halfback on both offense and defense at the University of Kansas as a sophomore, Hadl played quarterback for his last two years, and was selected as the school's Player of the Century. He was an All-American at halfback in 1960 and at quarterback in 1961.

Hadl was the first Kansas player to be picked twice for All-America (1960 and 1961) honors for his skills as a quarterback and halfback. Hadl also excelled as a defensive back, punt returner, and punter; he led the country with a 45.6-yard punting average in 1959. Hadl's No. 21 jersey is one of only three Kansas has retired. Hadl, who was picked for the all-conference team for three seasons, wound up with 1,281 yards passing and 1,016 yards rushing. Hadl still holds two Kansas records: longest interception return, a 98-yard run against TCU; and longest punt, 94 yards versus Oklahoma.

With Hadl running the offense, the Jayhawks were ranked in the top 20 during his junior and senior years, finishing 15–5–2. He wrapped up his Kansas career leading his team to a 33–7 win over Rice in the Bluebonnet Bowl. He was also named MVP in the East–West Shrine Game and the College All-Star Game.

Professional career

Hadl played at 6 ft 1 in (1.85 m) and 210 lb (95 kg). He joined the American Football League's San Diego Chargers in 1962. He shared quarterbacking duties until 1966, when he became San Diego's starting quarterback, and averaged over 3,000 yards and 23 touchdowns per (14-game) season for the next four years.

He was the American Football League's leading passer in both 1965 and 1968, and was a four-time AFL All-Star. In 1969, he was selected as the AFL All-Star Game's Most Valuable Player. The other half of the Chargers' potent passing/receiving tandem was wide receiver Lance Alworth, the first American Football League player to be inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame.

Before the 1973 season, Hadl was traded to the Los Angeles Rams for defensive end Coy Bacon and running back Bob Thomas. Leading the Rams to the playoffs that year—his first playoff appearance of any sort since 1965—he was named the National Football Conference Player of the Year.

In the following season, after he was beaten out for the starting quarterback position by James Harris, the 34-year-old Hadl was traded to the Green Bay Packers for five draft picks—first and second round picks for 1975 and 1976, as well as a third round pick in 1975. Reportedly, head coach and general manager Dan Devine felt that an experienced quarterback was the only thing standing between the Packers and only their second playoff appearance since 1967. The trade turned out to be an unmitigated disaster; it is reckoned as one of the worst (if not the worst) trades for a starting quarterback in NFL history. Hadl played a total of 22 games with the Packers and threw for 9 touchdowns and 29 interceptions behind a porous offensive line; the team posted a 7–15 record over this span. The trade caused irreparable harm to Hadl's legacy and hastened a two-decade fall from glory for the Packer franchise; they would not make the playoffs again in a non-strike year until 1993. Devine left after the 1974 season and returned to collegiate coaching at Notre Dame, succeeded at Green Bay by Bart Starr.

At the same time, the Rams used the picks acquired in the trade to acquire many of the players that allowed them to dominate the NFC West for the rest of the 1970s and lead them to an appearance in Super Bowl XIV.[1] In later years, when asked for his thoughts on the infamous deal, Hadl himself expressed the surprise he felt, in 1974, at being sent to Green Bay: "I really didn't believe it... I didn't think anyone would be that desperate."[2] Following the 1975 season, he was traded to another moribund franchise, the Houston Oilers, serving as backup to Dan Pastorini for two years before retiring.

Despite his tenure with Green Bay, Hadl finished with a starting record of 82–76–9 in his professional career. He holds the NFL record for the most tied games (9) by a starting quarterback. Hadl wore #21 for nearly his entire NFL career, aside from his first season with Green Bay when he briefly wore #12. He was the last regular starting quarterback to wear a uniform number greater than #19 before the NFL adopted a rigid uniform numbering system in 1973.

The Professional Football Researchers Association named Hadl to the PRFA Hall of Very Good Class of 2006 [3]

Coaching and administrative career

Upon retiring as a player after the 1977 season, Hadl went back to his alma mater and served as quarterback coach under Bud Moore at the University of Kansas in 1978. From 1979-81, he remained at KU, moving up to offensive coordinator under new head coach Don Fambrough. At this time, he was fingered as the "unnamed assistant football coach" who provided improper benefits to Kansas recruits in the early 1980s, which resulted in the NCAA imposing sanctions on the football program. Hadl consistently denied any wrongdoing, and his current tenure with Kansas athletics has not yielded any suggestion of rules violations.[4][5]

Unable to return to the program after 1981, he moved on to the Los Angeles Rams as an assistant coach in 1982. In 1983, he joined the Denver Broncos as the quarterback coach, where he was tasked with turning highly touted draft pick John Elway into a franchise quarterback.

After one season, Hadl decided to move on, and became the head coach of the Los Angeles Express of the United States Football League (USFL) during 1984 and 1985, compiling a record of 13–23 in the regular season, 1–1 in the postseason. Hadl would later call this decision a "career blunder."

Hadl is currently back in Lawrence as associate athletic director in the University of Kansas athletic department.[6]

See also

References

  1. ^ Beacom, Mike (October 21, 2011). "A look back at the Hadl trade". Pro Football Weekly. Archived from the original on December 24, 2011.
  2. ^ http://www.jsonline.com/sports/packers/195472911.html
  3. ^ "Hall of Very Good Class of 2006". Retrieved November 23, 2016.
  4. ^ Report of NCAA Sanctions from Lawrence (Kansas) Journal-World
  5. ^ Hadl Profile from The Topeka Capital-Journal
  6. ^ Hadl Profile from KU Athletics site

External links

1959 Kansas Jayhawks football team

The 1959 Kansas Jayhawks football team represented the University of Kansas in the Big Seven Conference during the 1959 college football season. In their second season under head coach Jack Mitchell, the Jayhawks compiled a 5–5 record (3–3 against conference opponents), tied for third in the Big Seven Conference, and outscored all opponents by a combined total of 163 to 134. They played their home games at Memorial Stadium in Lawrence, Kansas.

The team's statistical leaders included Curtis McClinton with 472 rushing yards, John Hadl with 126 receiving yards and Leland Flachsbarth with 345 passing yards. John Peppercorn and Ken Fitch were the team captains.The Jayhawks Week 2 game against the eventual National Champion Syracuse was featured in the 2008 film The Express.

1961 Kansas Jayhawks football team

The 1961 Kansas Jayhawks football team represented the University of Kansas in the 1961 college football season. The Jayhawks offense scored 269 points while the defense allowed 88 points. Led by head coach Jack Mitchell, the Jayhawks competed in the Bluebonnet Bowl. Quarterback John Hadl received votes to win the Heisman, including 33 first place votes, becoming the first Jayhawk to receive Heisman Trophy votes, finishing 7th in the voting.

1964 San Diego Chargers season

The 1964 San Diego Chargers season began with the team trying to repeat as AFL champions having won in 1963 with a record of 11–3.

1965 San Diego Chargers season

The 1965 San Diego Chargers season began with the team trying to improve on their 8–5–1 record in 1964. Head Coach Sid Gillman led the Chargers to their fifth AFL West title, with a 9–2–3 record, before losing the AFL Championship Game to the Buffalo Bills for the second consecutive season. After that season, the Chargers would never make another post-season appearance until nearly a decade after the AFL–NFL merger took place (1979).

1968 Cincinnati Bengals season

The 1968 Cincinnati Bengals season was the team's first year in professional football.

Paul Brown, who left the Cleveland Browns following the 1962 season with National Football League (NFL) record of 115–49–6, seven conference titles, and three NFL championships, had the urge to get back into football. His son Mike Brown did a study on pro football expansion and recommended Cincinnati as a potential site. In 1965, Brown met with Ohio Governor James Rhodes and the two agreed the state could accommodate a second pro football team.

1966 – Fearful the Cincinnati Reds baseball team would leave town and feeling pressure from local businessmen pushing for a pro football franchise, Cincinnati's city council approved the construction of Riverfront Stadium.

1967 – Brown's group was awarded an American Football League (AFL) expansion franchise. Brown named the team the Bengals, the name of Cincinnati's pro teams in the old AFL of the late 1930s. The Bengals acquired their first player late in the year when they traded two draft picks to Miami for quarterback John Stofa.

1968 – The Bengals were awarded 40 veteran players in the allocation draft. In the college draft, they selected University of Tennessee center Bob Johnson as their first pick. The Bengals lost their first preseason game 38–14 to the Kansas City Chiefs before 21,682 fans at the University of Cincinnati's Nippert Stadium. The Bengals upset the Denver Broncos 24–10 and the Buffalo Bills 34–23 in their first two regular-season home games. Halfback Paul Robinson led the AFL in rushing with 1,023 yards and was named Rookie of the Year.

1973 All-Pro Team

The following is a list of players that were named to the Associated Press All-Pro Team, the Newspaper Enterprise Association All-Pro team and the Pro Football Writers Association, and Pro Football Weekly All-Pro teams in 1973. Both first- and second- teams are listed for the AP, NEA, and PFWA teams. These are the four All-Pro teams that are included in the Total Football II: The Official Encyclopedia of the National Football League and compose the Consensus All-pro team for 1973.

1975 Green Bay Packers season

The 1975 Green Bay Packers season was their 57th season overall and their 55th season in the National Football League. The club posted a 4–10 record under new coach Bart Starr, earning them a fourth-place finish in the NFC Central division. The Packers got off to an 0-4 start, but finally beat the Cowboys in Dallas for Bart Starr's first coaching win. After a 1-8 start, the Packers would end the season on a positive note winning three of their final five games to finish with a 4-10 record.

American Football League draft

The American Football League (AFL, 1960–1969) stocked its teams in two ways:

Signing free agents (players whose contracts in other professional football leagues had expired, or who had no professional experience).

Signing players from the previous year's college graduates.The latter option involved a "draft" in which each team selected players who then were not available for other teams to select. The draft for the 1960 season was actually conducted in late 1959, shortly after the formation of the league. Thereafter, American Football League drafts were conducted separately from the rival NFL through 1966. Starting in 1967, after the NFL agreed to merge with the AFL, the two leagues conducted a "common draft".

In 1961 and 1962, the American Football League drafts were "regional". Teams were assigned broad geographical regions around their home city, and had "rights" to the players within those regions. The AFL's owners reckoned that players would be more willing to play in their league if they had the opportunity to sign with their "home town" teams, and also hoped to attract fans with players with whom they had some familiarity. The AFL also tapped sources which the NFL had disdained: small colleges and all-black colleges.

During the years in which the American Football League was in direct competition with the NFL for players (and fans), numerous star players chose to play in the AFL. The first and one of the most prominent of these was LSU All-American Billy Cannon, who went on to become an AFL All-Star both as a running back with the Houston Oilers and as a tight end with the Oakland Raiders. Other greats signed by the AFL in the years before the common draft included Abner Haynes and Johnny Robinson (Dallas Texans); Jim Otto (Oakland Raiders); Lance Alworth, John Hadl, and Ron Mix (San Diego Chargers), Lionel Taylor (Denver Broncos); Billy Shaw (Buffalo Bills); Larry Grantham (New York Titans); Matt Snell and Joe Namath (New York Jets); Nick Buoniconti (Boston Patriots) and a host of others.

Bob Dee

Robert Henry Dee (May 18, 1933 – April 18, 1979) was an American football defensive end in the National Football League and the American Football League. He was a three-sport letterman at the College of the Holy Cross who was one of the first players signed by the Boston Patriots of the American Football League in 1960.

After two years with the Washington Redskins in 1957–58, Dee returned to Holy Cross to tutor the team's linemen.

He became an ironman of the American Football League who never missed a game during his career, starting 112 consecutive games. Despite equipment improvements over the years, Dee was a superstitious player who chose to wear the same helmet throughout his career (105 of 112 games). Dee etched his name in the history books by scoring the first points in American Football League history, scoring a touchdown when he dove onto a fumble by Bills QB Tommy O'Connell (father of former Boston Bruins GM Mike O'Connell) the end zone in the second quarter of the league's first-ever exhibition game, a contest between the Patriots and the Bills on July 30, 1960. He was voted to four American Football League All-Star teams (1961, 1963–65) and is a member of the Patriots All-1960s (AFL) Team.

Dee recorded 33 QB sacks (not including his strip sack of Tommy O'Connell in the AFL's first Exhibition Game).

Dee sacked Frank Tripucka, Al Dorow, Hunter Enis, Jacky Lee, MC Reynolds, Randy Duncan, Cotton Davidson, George Blanda, Jack Kemp, Johnny Green, John Hadl, Tobin Rote, Len Dawson, Eddie Wilson, Dick Wood, Joe Namath, Tom Flores, Rick Norton and Bob Griese and recovered fumbles by Al Carmichael, Art Baker, Wayne Crow, Jacky Lee, Paul Lowe, Bill Tobin, Wray Carlton & Max Chobian.

He had two interceptions in the Patriots 26-8 Eastern Divisional Playoff Game win over the Buffalo Bills. In that game, he wore one sneaker and one football shoe with spikes, which made him maneuver better in the snow in the game played at War Memorial Stadium on December 28, 1963.

On July 22, 1968, Dee announced his retirement from professional football, citing a business opportunity that was "too good to resist."

Dee died of a heart attack in 1979 while on a business trip.

He was awarded a game ball for his outstanding performance in the Patriots 34-17 win over the Houston Oilers on November 29, 1964.

He was inducted in the Patriots Hall of Fame on August 18, 1993.

In recognition of his accomplishments on the field, the Patriots retired his number (89).

Chuck Knox

Charles Robert Knox (April 27, 1932 – May 12, 2018) was an American football coach at the high school, collegiate and professional levels. He served as head coach of three National Football League (NFL) teams, the Los Angeles Rams (twice), Seattle Seahawks, and Buffalo Bills. He was a three-time AP NFL Coach of the Year and is a member of the Seahawks Ring of Honor.

David Jaynes

David Duane Jaynes (born December 12, 1952) is a former American football quarterback raised in Bonner Springs, Kansas. He was an All-American in 1973 for the University of Kansas.

During the early 1970s, Jaynes broke virtually every passing record in Kansas history. When he left Kansas, he was first in passing, with 5,132 yards. This record held for ten years until broken in 1983 by Frank Seurer. Jaynes also left Kansas with the record for career passing touchdowns at 35, which held up till 2009, when he was passed by Todd Reesing. Jaynes' most memorable game was in 1973 against SEC power Tennessee, when he completed 35 of 58 attempted passes for 394 yards in the 28-27 loss. In 1973 Kansas finished 7–4–1 and went to the Liberty Bowl. Jaynes finished fourth in the voting that year for the Heisman Trophy. Jaynes is, to date, the only Heisman Trophy finalist in Kansas football history. He's one of 3 players to receive votes, along with John Hadl and Bobby Douglass

Jaynes was drafted in the third round (66th overall) of the 1974 NFL Draft by the Kansas City Chiefs with whom he played two games that season, failing to complete either of his only two passing attempts, one of which was intercepted. He was also the first player selected in the inaugural World Football League by the Houston Texans, but never signed with them.In September 2001, he married Cary Grant's widow, Barbara Harris.

History of the San Diego Chargers

The professional American football team now known as the Los Angeles Chargers previously played in San Diego, California as the San Diego Chargers from 1961 to 2017 before relocating back to Los Angeles where the team played their inaugural 1960. The Chargers franchise relocated from Los Angeles to San Diego in 1961. The Chargers' first home game in San Diego was at Balboa Stadium against the Oakland Raiders on September 17, 1961. Their last game as a San Diego-based club was played at Qualcomm Stadium in San Diego on January 1, 2017 against the Kansas City Chiefs, who defeated the host Chargers, 30–13.

Kansas Jayhawks football

The Kansas Jayhawks football program is the intercollegiate football program of the University of Kansas. The program is classified in the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Division I Bowl Subdivision (FBS), and the team competes in the Big 12 Conference. The head coach is Les Miles who became the coach following the 2018 season.

The program's first season was 1890, making it one of the earlier football programs established in the United States. The team's home field is David Booth Kansas Memorial Stadium, which opened in 1921 and is the seventh-oldest college football stadium in the nation. Until 2014, Memorial Stadium was one of the few football stadiums in Division I that had a track encircling the field. KU's all-time record was 585–640–58 as of the conclusion of the 2018 season. The program saw a re-emergence under head coach Mark Mangino who won 50 games in eight seasons. After Magino's departure the program quickly declined winning only 15 games in the eight seasons after he left the program.

While Kansas has yet to have a Heisman Trophy winner, they have had one Heisman finalist and 2 other players receive votes. John Hadl, Bobby Douglass, and David Jaynes all received votes, Jaynes being the only finalist. Other notable former Kansas players include Pro Football Hall of Famers Gale Sayers, John Riggins, and Mike McCormack, as well as All-Americans Nolan Cromwell, Dana Stubblefield, Aqib Talib, and Anthony Collins. Kansas has appeared in twelve bowl games, including three trips to the Orange Bowl (1948, 1969, and 2008). Kansas played in the first NCAA-contracted nationally televised regular season college football game on September 20, 1952, against TCU.

Along with Iowa, Missouri, Nebraska, and Washington University in St. Louis, Kansas was a charter member of the Missouri Valley Intercollegiate Athletic Association in 1907, which evolved into the Big Eight Conference. The Big Eight was folded into the Big 12 in 1996, and Kansas is the only original member of the MVIAA that is still part of the Big 12.

List of Kansas Jayhawks in the NFL Draft

The University of Kansas Jayhawks football team has had 175 players drafted into the National Football League (NFL) since the first draft held in 1936, through the 2018 NFL Draft. KU has seen nine players taken in the first round, including six top-10 picks: Gale Sayers, John Riggins, Ray Evans, Mike Butler, John Hadl, and David Verser. Sayers, a College and Pro Football Hall of Famer, was the highest pick from KU as the fourth overall pick in the 1965 NFL Draft.

Through the annual NFL Draft each NFL franchise gets the chance to add new players to their teams. The current draft rules were established in 2009. The team with the worst record the previous year gets to pick first, then the next-worst team picks second, and so on. Teams that were not in the playoffs receive their draft order by their regular-season record. If 2 or more non-playoff teams have the same record the tie breaker used is their strength of schedule. Playoff teams receive their draft order after all the non-playoff teams, based on their round of elimination (wild card, division, conference, and Super Bowl).In 1944 the All-America Football Conference was established and it began play in 1946 in direct competition with the NFL. From 1946 to 1949 the two leagues fiercely competed for the top college football prospects with each league holding their own drafts, before the AAFC finally merged with the NFL at the end of the 1949 season.

Like the AAFC earlier, the American Football League (AFL) operated in direct competition with the NFL and held a separate draft. This led to a massive bidding war over top prospects between the two leagues. As part of the merger agreement on June 8, 1966, the two leagues would hold a multiple round "Common Draft". Once the AFL officially merged with the NFL in 1970, the "Common Draft" simply became the NFL Draft.Sixteen former Jayhawks who were drafted have been selected to a Pro Bowl or AFL All-Star Game. Twelve former Jayhawks who were drafted have won a championship with their respective teams, one was named MVP, John Riggins in Super Bowl XVII.

List of Los Angeles Chargers starting quarterbacks

These quarterbacks have started at least one game for the National Football League (NFL)'s Los Angeles Chargers or its predecessor, the San Diego Chargers. They are listed in order of the date of each player's first start at quarterback for the team.

List of Los Angeles Rams starting quarterbacks

These quarterbacks have started at least one game for the Los Angeles Rams of the National Football League. The Rams were formerly known as the St. Louis Rams and the Cleveland Rams. The players are listed in order of the date of each player's first start at quarterback for the Rams.

List of National Football League annual passing yards leaders

This is a list of National Football League quarterbacks who have led the regular season in passing yards each year. The record for passing yards in a season is held by Peyton Manning of the Denver Broncos who threw for 5,477 in 2013. Drew Brees has led the NFL in passing yards in seven seasons, more than any other quarterback in NFL history. Brees also has five 5,000 yard passing seasons. No other quarterback has more than one.

List of Tennessee Titans starting quarterbacks

These quarterbacks have started at least one game for the Tennessee Titans of the National Football League. They are listed in order of the date of each player's first start at quarterback for the Titans.

Lynn Dickey

Clifford Lynn Dickey (born October 19, 1949) is a retired National Football League quarterback, who played for the Houston Oilers and the Green Bay Packers in the 1970s and 1980s.

John Hadl—championships, awards, and honors

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