John G. Carlisle

John Griffin Carlisle (September 5, 1834 – July 31, 1910) was a prominent American politician in the Democratic Party during the last quarter of the 19th century. He served as the Speaker of the United States House of Representatives, from 1883 to 1889 and afterward served as Secretary of the Treasury, from 1893 to 1897, during the Panic of 1893. As a Bourbon Democrat he was a leader of the conservative, pro-business wing of the party, along with President Grover Cleveland.

John Carlisle
John Griffin Carlisle, Brady-Handy photo portrait, ca1870-1880
41st United States Secretary of the Treasury
In office
March 7, 1893 – March 5, 1897
PresidentGrover Cleveland
Preceded byCharles Foster
Succeeded byLyman J. Gage
United States Senator
from Kentucky
In office
May 26, 1890 – February 4, 1893
Preceded byJames B. Beck
Succeeded byWilliam Lindsay
31st Speaker of the United States House of Representatives
In office
December 3, 1883 – March 4, 1889
Preceded byJ. Warren Keifer
Succeeded byThomas Reed
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Kentucky's 6th district
In office
March 4, 1877 – May 26, 1890
Preceded byThomas Jones
Succeeded byWilliam Dickerson
20th Lieutenant Governor of Kentucky
In office
September 5, 1871 – August 31, 1875
GovernorPreston Leslie
Preceded byPreston Leslie
Succeeded byJohn C. Underwood
Personal details
Born
John Griffin Carlisle

September 5, 1834
Campbell County, Kentucky, U.S. (now Kenton County)
DiedJuly 31, 1910 (aged 75)
New York City, New York, U.S.
Resting placeLinden Grove Cemetery
Political partyDemocratic
Spouse(s)Mary Goodson
Children2
Signature
John G. Carlisle's signature

Biography

Ladies of the Cabinet
Ladies of the Cabinet: Mrs. Lamont, Mrs. Olney, Mrs. Bissell, Mrs. Gresham, Mrs. Cleveland, Mrs. Carlisle, Mrs. Herbert, Mrs. Smith, Miss Morton
John G. Carlisle's gradchildren (Jane middle, Laura right)
John G. Carlisle's grandchildren (Jane middle, Laura right)

Carlisle was born in what is now Kenton County, Kentucky, and began his public life as a lawyer in Covington, Kentucky, under John W. Stevenson. Carlisle married Mary Jane Goodson on January 15, 1857, and they had two sons: William Kinkead Carlisle and Logan Griffin Carlisle.

Mary Jane Goodson was born in Covington, Kentucky, August 2, 1835. Her father, Major John Adam Goodson, served in the war of 1812, and for several terms represented his district in the House of Representatives. Both William Kinkead Carlisle and Logan Griffin Carlisle were lawyers by profession. William Carlisle was married and had three children.[1]

Despite the political difficulties that taking a neutral position during the American Civil War caused him, Carlisle spent most of the 1860s in the Kentucky General Assembly, serving in the Kentucky House of Representatives and two terms in the Kentucky State Senate, and was elected Lieutenant Governor of Kentucky in 1871, succeeding his former law mentor Stevenson.

After Carlisle's term as Lieutenant Governor ended in 1875, he ran for and won a seat in the United States House of Representatives for Kentucky's 6th district. On the main issues of the day, Carlisle was in favor of coining silver, but not for free coinage, and favored lower tariffs. He became a leader of the low-tariff wing of the Democratic Party, and was chosen by House Democrats to become Speaker in 1883 over Samuel J. Randall, a leader of the party's protectionist wing.

CARLISLE, John Griffin-Treasury (BEP engraved portrait)
Bureau of Engraving and Printing portrait of Carlisle as Secretary of the Treasury.

Carlisle became a leader of the conservative Bourbon Democrats and was mentioned as a presidential candidate but the Democrats passed him over at their conventions for Winfield S. Hancock in 1880 and Grover Cleveland in 1884. Discomfort with nominating a southerner after the Civil War played a role in Carlisle's failure to win either nomination. In 1892 Carlisle was again proposed as a candidate for president at the Democratic convention, but this time Carlisle asked that he not be considered. It was reported at the time that Carlisle dropped out with the understanding that Cleveland, once nominated, would appoint him to his Cabinet.

In 1890, Carlisle was appointed to the United States Senate to fill the unexpired term of James B. Beck. When Cleveland was again elected to the Presidency in 1892, he chose Carlisle as his Secretary of the Treasury.

Carlisle's tenure as Secretary was marred by the Panic of 1893, a financial and economic disaster so severe that it ended Carlisle's political career. In response to a run on the American gold supply, Carlisle felt forced to end silver coinage. He also felt compelled to oppose the 1894 Wilson-Gorman Tariff bill. These two stands were widely unpopular among agrarian Democrats. In 1896 Carlisle strenuously opposed Democratic presidential nominee William Jennings Bryan, supporting a splinter Gold Democrat candidate, once-Illinois Governor Palmer, instead.[2]

By 1896, the once remarkably popular Carlisle was so disliked due to his stewardship of the currency that he was forced to leave the stage in the middle of a speech in his home town of Covington due to a barrage of rotten eggs.

By May 1899, the North American Trust Company had directors such as John G. Carlisle, Adlai E. Stevenson, and Wager Swayne.[3]

He moved to New York City, where he practiced law, and died on July 31, 1910, at age 75, and is buried in Linden Grove Cemetery in Covington, Kentucky.[4]

Legacy

Carlisle County, Kentucky was established in 1886.[5]

References

  1. ^ Hinman, Ida (1895). The Washington Sketch Book. |access-date= requires |url= (help)
  2. ^ David T. Beito and Linda Royster Beito, "Gold Democrats and the Decline of Classical Liberalism, 1896-1900," Independent Review 4 (Spring 2000), 555-75
  3. ^ "Trust Company Election; The North American Chooses Alvah Trowbridge as Its Leader. He Succeeds Col. Trenholdm - The New Head Brings to the Corporation Important Financial Interests -- No Friction". The New York Times. New York City, United States. May 27, 1899. p. 3. Retrieved July 16, 2017.
  4. ^ Federal Writers' Project (1996). The WPA Guide to Kentucky. University Press of Kentucky. p. 154. ISBN 0813108659. Retrieved 24 November 2013.
  5. ^ The Register of the Kentucky State Historical Society, Volume 1. Kentucky State Historical Society. 1903. p. 34.

External links

Political offices
Preceded by
Preston Leslie
Lieutenant Governor of Kentucky
1871–1875
Succeeded by
John C. Underwood
Preceded by
J. Warren Keifer
Speaker of the United States House of Representatives
1883–1889
Succeeded by
Thomas Reed
Preceded by
Charles Foster
United States Secretary of the Treasury
1893–1897
Succeeded by
Lyman J. Gage
U.S. House of Representatives
Preceded by
Thomas Jones
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Kentucky's 6th congressional district

1877–1890
Succeeded by
William Dickerson
Preceded by
J. Warren Keifer
Chair of the House Rules Committee
1883–1889
Succeeded by
Thomas Reed
U.S. Senate
Preceded by
James B. Beck
U.S. Senator (Class 2) from Kentucky
1890–1893
Served alongside: Joseph Blackburn
Succeeded by
William Lindsay
1834 in the United States

Events from the year 1834 in the United States.

1884 Democratic National Convention

In 1884, the Democrats gathered in Chicago for their National Convention. The Democrats made Governor Grover Cleveland of New York their presidential nominee with the former Governor Thomas A. Hendricks of Indiana as the vice presidential nominee.

48th United States Congress

The Forty-Eighth United States Congress was a meeting of the legislative branch of the United States federal government, consisting of the United States Senate and the United States House of Representatives. It met in Washington, D.C. from March 4, 1883, to March 4, 1885, during the last two years of the administration of U.S. President Chester A. Arthur. The apportionment of seats in the House of Representatives was based on the Tenth Census of the United States in 1880. The Senate had a Republican majority, and the House had a Democratic majority.

49th United States Congress

The Forty-ninth United States Congress was a meeting of the legislative branch of the United States federal government, consisting of the United States Senate and the United States House of Representatives. It met in Washington, D.C. from March 4, 1885, to March 4, 1887, during the first two years of Grover Cleveland's first presidency. The apportionment of seats in the House of Representatives was based on the Tenth Census of the United States in 1880. The Senate had a Republican majority, and the House had a Democratic majority.

50th United States Congress

The Fiftieth United States Congress was a meeting of the legislative branch of the United States federal government, consisting of the United States Senate and the United States House of Representatives. It met in Washington, D.C. from March 4, 1887, to March 4, 1889, during the third and fourth years of Grover Cleveland's first presidency. The apportionment of seats in the House of Representatives was based on the Tenth Census of the United States in 1880. The Senate had a Republican majority, and the House had a Democratic majority.

51st United States Congress

The Fifty-first United States Congress, referred to by some critics as the Billion Dollar Congress, was a meeting of the legislative branch of the United States federal government, consisting of the United States Senate and the United States House of Representatives. It met in Washington, D.C., from March 4, 1889, to March 4, 1891, during the first two years of the administration of U.S. President Benjamin Harrison.

The apportionment of seats in this House of Representatives was based on the Tenth Census of the United States in 1880. Both chambers had a Republican majority. This marked the first time since the 43rd United States Congress that both chambers were controlled by the president's party.

Bernart T. Wisenall

Bernard T. Wisenall (? - 1942) was a leading architect in Northern Kentucky. He worked with Louis G. Dittoe from 1895 to 1909 and on his own from 1910 to 1940.Dittoe & Wisenall designed the former Covington City Hall, "a Richardsonian-Chateauesque building at the south end of the Suspension Bridge", First Christian Church, 14 W. Fifth Street in Covington (1893–1894), and the Pugh Power (now [W.H.] Polk) Building in Cincinnati on SEC Pike and Fifth streets. Pugh Power was "said to have been the largest reinforced concrete structure in the world at the time of its construction in 1904–1905" and was enlarged in 1906 during the original construction effort "owing to its initial success" and again in 1909. Wisenall's partnered with Chester Disque for later works including the John G. Carlisle School and the former Fifth District School in Covington, "both were handsome simplified Art Deco/Moderne designs with broad horizontal stripes in buff and brown brick, and both have recently been altered beyond recognition." Wisenall lived in the historic Hathaway House in West Covington during his later years "which may have influenced some of his own Colonial Revival work".

Carlisle, Nebraska

Carlisle is an unincorporated community in Fillmore County, Nebraska, in the United States.

Charles Foster (Ohio politician)

Charles William Foster, Jr. (April 12, 1828 – January 9, 1904) was a U.S. Republican politician from Ohio. Foster was the 35th Governor of Ohio, and later went on to serve as Secretary of the Treasury under Benjamin Harrison.

George M. Thomas (American politician)

George Morgan Thomas (November 23, 1828 – January 7, 1914) was a U.S. Representative from Kentucky.

Born near Poplar Flat, Kentucky, Thomas was educated in the common schools. He taught school two years. He was school commissioner from 1850 to 1859. He studied law, was admitted to the bar in 1851, and practiced.

Thomas was elected prosecuting attorney of Lewis County in 1854 and served for four years. He was a member of the Kentucky House of Representatives from 1859 to 1863. He served as Commonwealth's attorney for the tenth judicial district 1862-1868. He was elected county judge in 1868 and was an unsuccessful Republican candidate for Lieutenant Governor of Kentucky in 1871, losing the election to Democrat John G. Carlisle. He was again a member of the State house of representatives in 1872 and 1873. He was the circuit judge of the fourteenth judicial district from 1874 to 1880 and United States district attorney from 1881 to 1885.

Thomas was elected as a Republican to the Fiftieth Congress (March 4, 1887 – March 3, 1889). He was appointed Solicitor of Internal Revenue by President William McKinley on May 20, 1897, and served until May 31, 1901.

He died in Vanceburg, Kentucky, January 7, 1914. He was interred in Woodland Cemetery on a hill overlooking the city.

Linden Grove Cemetery

Linden Grove Cemetery is located along Holman Street, between 13th and 15th streets in Covington, Kentucky, United States. It is the second public cemetery in Covington, the city's first public burial ground being Craig Street Cemetery, which dates to 1815. Craig Street Cemetery closed in 1872. Most of the bodies were moved to Linden Grove.

Trustees of the nearby Western Baptist Theological Institute which was formed to train Baptist ministers founded the cemetery in 1842, and from the beginning allowed burials without regard to race or religion. The Western Baptist Theological Institute had been formed in 1833 to train Baptist ministers and at one time its grounds covered several hundred acres.

Some accounts say burials at Linden Grove began in 1842, but the Licking Valley Register reported on September 9, 1843, that elaborate plans had been proposed for dedicating "this beautiful spot of ground" on September 11. Plans called for music and talks by ministers and groups from Presbyterian, Episcopal and Methodist churches in Covington.

The writer described Linden Grove as about "60 acres of high table land, overlooking the city of Cincinnati and situated in the midst of the most quiet and romantic scenery." The newspaper reporter concluded, "A place like this, in the vicinity of Cincinnati, would be thronged with the admirers of nature and art thus happily combined." A later account said a large crowd attended the dedication ceremonies.

As early as May 1851, The Covington Journal was cautioning lot owners to get more involved in the operation of the cemetery and warned that indifference was sure to lead to problems. Another Covington Journal account on May 1, 1858, noted that since its opening, Linden Grove had had more than 2,000 burials. Especially heavy years were 1850 and 1851, when cholera swept through the area. Those years there were more than 260 burials, compared to 160 in most other years.

Vandalism had become enough of a problem by 1859 that newspaper advertisements were run in the Covington Journal warning of fines of $5 to $50 for damaging grave sites. By 1868, Covington Journal accounts said another public burial site might soon be needed for Covington. The December 26 story said the Craig Street site had been full for several years and Linden Grove was quickly filling up. Highland Cemetery in Fort Mitchell would later be dedicated on June 26, 1869, to handle those needs.

Alben Barkley, the former Vice President and U.S. senator, was the guest speaker at the 1953 Memorial Day ceremonies at Linden Grove. The Norman-Barnes Post of the American Legion served as Barkley's escort during the ceremonies. That Covington post later sponsored placement of a marker dedicated to Civil War veterans buried at Linden Grove.

Among those moved to Linden Grove was Thomas Kennedy, one of the founders of Covington. The cemetery's residents also include three former Northern Kentucky congressmen, including John G. Carlisle, namesake of an elementary school in Covington; William Wright Southgate; John W. Menzies; and William Evans Arthur.

Linden Grove is the resting place of many Civil War veterans, including eighteen in colored units of the United States Army. Union and Confederate soldiers are buried facing each other in uniform rows. Two monuments to the war, the Veteran's Monument in Covington and the GAR Monument in Covington, are inside the cemetery, and like the cemetery, are on the National Register of Historic Places.

The cemetery has been in receivership for half a century, with the city and Kenton County charged with overseeing it.

On September 8, 2006, the Kentucky Governor's Office of Local Development announced a grant of $23,863.00, to be combined with $44,000.00 from the City of Covington, $22,000.00 from the Kenton County Fiscal Court and $5,500.00 from the Cemetery. These monies will be used for new fencing on West 13th Street and Linden Avenue.

In 2003, $25,000 from the Cemetery Preservation Fund and $85,000 in local money was used to replace fencing along Kavanaugh Street.

List of United States Senators in the 51st Congress by seniority

This is a complete list of members of the United States Senate during the 51st United States Congress listed by seniority, from March 4, 1889, to March 3, 1891.

Order of service is based on the commencement of the senator's first term. Behind this is former service as a senator (only giving the senator seniority within his or her new incoming class), service as vice president, a House member, a cabinet secretary, or a governor of a state. The final factor is the population of the senator's state.Senators who were sworn in during the middle of the Congress (up until the last senator who was not sworn in early after winning the November 1890 election) are listed at the end of the list with no number.

List of United States Senators in the 52nd Congress by seniority

This is a complete list of members of the United States Senate during the 52nd United States Congress listed by seniority, from March 4, 1891, to March 3, 1893.

Order of service is based on the commencement of the senator's first term. Behind this is former service as a senator (only giving the senator seniority within his or her new incoming class), service as vice president, a House member, a cabinet secretary, or a governor of a state. The final factor is the population of the senator's state.Senators who were sworn in during the middle of the Congress (up until the last senator who was not sworn in early after winning the November 1892 election) are listed at the end of the list with no number.

Lyman J. Gage

Lyman Judson Gage (June 28, 1836 – January 26, 1927) was an American financier and Presidential Cabinet officer.

Political party strength in Kentucky

The following table indicates the party of elected officials in the U.S. state of Kentucky:

Governor

Lieutenant Governor

Secretary of State

Attorney General

State Treasurer

Auditor of Public Accounts

Agriculture CommissionerThe table also indicates the historical party composition in the:

State Senate

State House of Representatives

State delegation to the United States Senate

State delegation to the United States House of RepresentativesFor years in which a presidential election was held, the table indicates which party's nominees received the state's electoral votes.

The parties are as follows: American (A), Democratic (D), Democratic-Republican (DR), Independent (I), National Republican (NR), Republican (R), and Whig (W).

Thomas Laurens Jones

Thomas Laurens Jones (January 22, 1819 – June 20, 1887) was a U.S. Representative from Kentucky.

Born in White Oak, North Carolina, Jones attended private schools. He graduated from Princeton College and from the law department of Harvard University. He was admitted to the bar in Columbia, South Carolina, in 1846 and commenced practice in New York City in 1847. He moved to Newport, Kentucky, in 1849 and continued the practice of law. He served as a member of the State house of representatives from Campbell County 1853–1855.

Jones was elected as a Democrat to the Fortieth and Forty-first Congresses (March 4, 1867 – March 3, 1871). He was not a candidate for renomination in 1870.

Jones was elected to the Forty-fourth Congress (March 4, 1875 – March 3, 1877). He served as chairman of the Committee on Railways and Canals (Forty-fourth Congress). He was not a candidate for renomination. He resumed the practice of law. He died in Newport, Kentucky, June 20, 1887. He was interred in Evergreen Cemetery.

United States congressional delegations from Kentucky

Below are tables of congressional delegations from Kentucky to the United States House of Representatives and the United States Senate.

William Lindsay (Kentucky politician)

William Lindsay (September 4, 1835 – October 15, 1909) was a Democratic U.S. Senator from Kentucky from 1893 to 1901.

Born near Lexington, Virginia, Lindsay attended the common schools and settled in Clinton, Kentucky in 1854. There he taught school and studied law. He was admitted to the bar and commenced practice in Clinton in 1858. During the American Civil War, Lindsay served in the infantry in the Confederate States Army from July 1861 until May 1865, after which he resumed the practice of law in Clinton.

Linsay was a member of the Kentucky Senate from 1867 to 1870. He served as judge of the Kentucky Court of Appeals from 1870 to 1878, and served as chief justice of the court from 1876 to 1878. He then resumed the practice of law in Frankfort, Kentucky. He again joined the Kentucky Senate, serving from 1889 to 1893. He then served as United States Commissioner to the World's Columbian Exposition, held at Chicago, Illinois, in 1893.

Lindsay was elected to the United States Senate to fill the vacancy created by the resignation of John G. Carlisle. He was reelected, and served in total from February 15, 1893, until March 3, 1901, and chaired the Committee on Indian Depredations and the Committee on Revolutionary Claims. He was not a candidate for renomination in 1900, but instead moved to New York City and practiced law. He was appointed United States Commissioner to the Louisiana Purchase Exposition at St. Louis, Missouri, in 1901. He died in Frankfort, and was interred in the State Cemetery.

William Worth Dickerson

William Worth Dickerson (November 29, 1851 – January 31, 1923) was a U.S. Representative from Kentucky.

Born in Sherman, Kentucky, Dickerson attended the public schools and the private academy of New Mexico Lloyd in Crittenden, Kentucky.

He studied law.

He was admitted to the bar in 1872 and commenced practice in Williamstown, Kentucky.

He served as prosecuting attorney of Grant County 1872-1876.

He served as member of the State house of representatives 1885-1887.

He served in the State senate 1887-1891.

Dickerson was elected as a Democrat to the Fifty-first Congress to fill the vacancy caused by the resignation of John G. Carlisle.

He was reelected to the Fifty-second Congress and served from June 21, 1890, to March 3, 1893.

He was an unsuccessful candidate for renomination in 1892.

He resumed the practice of law in Williamstown, Kentucky.

He moved to Cincinnati, Ohio, in 1902 and continued the practice of his profession until his death January 31, 1923.

He remains were cremated and the ashes interred in the City Cemetery, Williamstown, Kentucky.

18th century
19th century
20th century
21st century
Class 2
Class 3
Secretary of State
Secretary of the Treasury
Secretary of War
Attorney General
Postmaster General
Secretary of the Navy
Secretary of the Interior
Secretary of Agriculture
Kentucky's delegation(s) to the 45th–52nd United States Congresses (ordered by seniority)
45th Senate: T. C. McCreery | J. B. Beck House: M. J. Durham | A. Boone | J. P. Knott | J. C. S. Blackburn | J. B. Clarke | J. A. McKenzie | J. W. Caldwell | A. S. Willis | J. G. Carlisle | T. Turner
46th Senate: J. B. Beck | J. S. Williams House: J. P. Knott | J. C. S. Blackburn | J. A. McKenzie | J. W. Caldwell | A. S. Willis | J. G. Carlisle | T. Turner | O. Turner | P. B. Thompson Jr. | E. Phister
47th Senate: J. B. Beck | J. S. Williams House: J. P. Knott | J. C. S. Blackburn | J. A. McKenzie | J. W. Caldwell | A. S. Willis | J. G. Carlisle | O. Turner | P. B. Thompson Jr. | E. Phister | J. D. White
48th Senate: J. B. Beck | J. S. Williams House: J. C. S. Blackburn | A. S. Willis | J. G. Carlisle | O. Turner | P. B. Thompson Jr. | J. D. White | J. F. Clay | J. E. Halsell | T. A. Robertson | W. W. Culbertson | F. L. Wolford
49th Senate: J. B. Beck | J. C. S. Blackburn House: A. S. Willis | J. G. Carlisle | J. E. Halsell | T. A. Robertson | F. L. Wolford | W. J. Stone | P. Laffoon | W. C. P. Breckinridge | J. B. McCreary | W. H. Wadsworth | W. P. Taulbee
50th Senate: J. B. Beck | J. C. S. Blackburn House: J. G. Carlisle | W. J. Stone | P. Laffoon | W. C. P. Breckinridge | J. B. McCreary | W. P. Taulbee | W. G. Hunter | A. B. Montgomery | A. G. Caruth | G. M. Thomas | H. F. Finley
51st Senate: J. B. Beck | J. C. S. Blackburn House: J. G. Carlisle | W. J. Stone | W. C. P. Breckinridge | J. B. McCreary | A. B. Montgomery | A. G. Caruth | H. F. Finley | W. T. Ellis | I. Goodnight | T. H. Paynter | J. H. Wilson
51st Senate: J. C. S. Blackburn | J. G. Carlisle House: W. J. Stone | W. C. P. Breckinridge | J. B. McCreary | A. B. Montgomery | A. G. Caruth | H. F. Finley | W. T. Ellis | I. Goodnight | T. H. Paynter | J. H. Wilson | W. W. Dickerson
52nd Senate: J. C. S. Blackburn | J. G. Carlisle | W. Lindsay House: W. J. Stone | W. C. P. Breckinridge | J. B. McCreary | A. B. Montgomery | A. G. Caruth | W. T. Ellis | I. Goodnight | T. H. Paynter | J. H. Wilson | W. W. Dickerson | J. W. Kendall | J. M. Kendall

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