Johann Deisenhofer

Johann Deisenhofer (born September 30, 1943) is a German biochemist who, along with Hartmut Michel and Robert Huber, received the Nobel Prize for Chemistry in 1988 for their determination of the first crystal structure of an integral membrane protein, a membrane-bound complex of proteins and co-factors that is essential to photosynthesis.[1][2][3][4]

Johann Deisenhofer
BornSeptember 30, 1943 (age 75)[1]
ResidenceDallas, Texas, U.S.
NationalityGermany and United States
Alma mater
Known for
AwardsMax Delbruck Prize (1986)
Nobel Prize for Chemistry (1988)
Scientific career
FieldsBiophysics, Biochemistry
InstitutionsUniversity of Texas Southwestern Medical Center[1]
Doctoral advisorRobert Huber[1]
Websitewww.utsouthwestern.edu/labs/deisenhofer

Early life and education

Photosynthetic Reaction Center Drawing
Schematic of photosynthetic reaction center structure in membrane.

Deisenhofer earned his doctorate from the Technical University of Munich for research work done at the Max Planck Institute of Biochemistry in Martinsried, West Germany, in 1974. He conducted research there until 1988, when he joined the scientific staff of the Howard Hughes Medical Institute and the faculty of the Department of Biochemistry at The University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas.

Career

Together with Michel and Huber, Deisenhofer determined the three-dimensional structure of a protein complex found in certain photosynthetic bacteria. This membrane protein complex, called a photosynthetic reaction center, was known to play a crucial role in initiating a simple type of photosynthesis. Between 1982 and 1985, the three scientists used X-ray crystallography to determine the exact arrangement of the more than 10,000 atoms that make up the protein complex. Their research increased the general understanding of the mechanisms of photosynthesis and revealed similarities between the photosynthetic processes of plants and bacteria.[5]

Deisenhofer currently serves on the board of advisors of Scientists and Engineers for America, an organization focused on promoting sound science in American government. In 2003 he was one of 22 Nobel Laureates who signed the Humanist Manifesto.[6] He is currently a Professor at the Department of Biophysics at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center.[7]

References

  1. ^ a b c d e f Frängsmyr, Tore; Malmström, Bo G., eds. (1992). Nobel Lectures, Chemistry 1981-1990,. World Scientific Publishing Co. Retrieved June 24, 2014.
  2. ^ Shampo, M. A.; Kyle, R. A. (2000). "Johann Deisenhofer—Nobel Laureate in Chemistry". Mayo Clinic Proceedings. 75 (2): 164. doi:10.4065/75.2.164. PMID 10683655.
  3. ^ Biography at www.nobel.org
  4. ^ Huber, R.; Deisenhofer, J.; Colman, P. M.; Matsushima, M.; Palm, W. (1976). "Crystallographic structure studies of an IgG molecule and an Fc fragment". Nature. 264 (5585): 415–20. doi:10.1038/264415a0. PMID 1004567.
  5. ^ Deisenhofer, J.; Epp, O.; Miki, K.; Huber, R.; Michel, H. (1985). "Structure of the protein subunits in the photosynthetic reaction centre of Rhodopseudomonas viridis at 3Å resolution". Nature. 318 (6047): 618–624. doi:10.1038/318618a0.
  6. ^ "Notable Signers". Humanism and Its Aspirations. American Humanist Association. Archived from the original on October 5, 2012. Retrieved October 1, 2012.
  7. ^ "Johann Deisenhofer, Ph.D. - Faculty Profile - UT Southwestern". Retrieved June 24, 2014.
1943 in Germany

Events in the year 1943 in Germany.

Deisenhofer

Deisenhofer is a surname. Notable people with the surname include:

Eduard Deisenhofer (1909-1945), German Waffen-SS officer and commander

Johann Deisenhofer (born 1943), German biochemist

Hartmut Michel

Hartmut Michel (born 18 July 1948) is a German biochemist, who received the 1988 Nobel Prize in Chemistry.

Max-Planck-Institut für Sozialrecht und Sozialpolitik

The Max Planck Institute for Social Law and Social Policy (German: Max-Planck-Institut für Sozialrecht und Sozialpolitik) is a research facility located in Maxvorstadt, Munich, Bavaria, Germany.

Max Delbruck Prize

The Max Delbruck Prize, formerly known as the Biological physics prize, is awarded by the Division of Biological Physics of the American Physical Society, to recognize and encourage outstanding achievement in biological physics research. The prize was established in 1981, and renamed for Max Delbrück in 2006. The award consists of $10,000, an allowance for travel to the meeting where the prize is awarded, and a certificate. It was presented biennially in even-numbered years until 2014, and will be presented annually starting 2015.

Max Planck Digital Library

The Max Planck Digital Library (MPDL) is a central service unit within the Max Planck Society. It is based in Munich, Germany.

The MPDL provides publication databases to the Max Planck Institutes, and supports them by creating digital and network-based research environments.

Max Planck Institute for Developmental Biology

The Max Planck Institute for Developmental Biology is located in Tübingen, Germany; it was founded in 1954 as an offshoot of the Tübingen-based Max Planck Institute for Biology. The main topics of scientific research conducted by the Max Planck Institute for Developmental Biology focus on the molecular mechanisms underlying spatial information within the embryo, communication between cells in the induction process, as well as the formation and differentiation of tissues and organs.

Max Planck Institute for Dynamics of Complex Technical Systems

The Max Planck Institute for Dynamics of Complex Technical Systems is located in Magdeburg, Germany. It was founded in 1996. It is one of 80 institutes in the Max Planck Society (Max Planck Gesellschaft).

Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Biology

The Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Biology is a German institute for evolutionary biology. It is located in Plön, Schleswig-Holstein, Germany.

Max Planck Institute for Experimental Medicine

The Max Planck Institute of Experimental Medicine (German: Max-Planck-Institut für Experimentelle Medizin) is located in Göttingen, Germany. It was founded as Kaiser Wilhelm Institute for Medical Research in 1947, and was renamed in 1965. It is one of 80 institutes in the Max Planck Society (Max-Planck-Gesellschaft). Prof. Dr. Klaus-Armin Nave is currently the acting director of the institute.

Max Planck Institute for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences

The Max Planck Institute for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences is located in Leipzig, Germany. The institute was founded in 2004 by a merger between the former Max Planck Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience in Leipzig and the Max Planck Institute for Psychological Research in Munich. It is one of 83 institutes in the Max Planck Society (Max Planck Gesellschaft).

Max Planck Institute for Mathematics in the Sciences

The Max Planck Institute for Mathematics in the Sciences(MPI

MiS) in Leipzig is a research institute of the Max Planck Society. Founded on March 1, 1996, the institute works on projects which apply mathematics in various areas of natural sciences, in particular physics, biology, chemistry and material science.

Its main areas of research are:

Nonlinear algebra (group of Bernd Sturmfels),

Pattern formation, energy landscapes and scaling laws (group of Felix Otto),

Riemannian, Kählerian and algebraic geometry (group of Jürgen Jost),

Neuronal networks (group of Jürgen Jost).The institute has an extensive visitors programme which has made Leipzig a main place for research in applied mathematics.

The MPI MiS is a member of ERCOM (European Research Centres in Mathematics).

Max Planck Institute for Meteorology

The Max Planck Institute for Meteorology (Max-Planck-Institut für Meteorologie, MPI-M) is a climate research institute located in Hamburg, Germany. Founded in 1975, it is operated by the Max Planck Society and based in Hamburg's district of Eimsbüttel.

Max Planck Institute for Molecular Biomedicine

The Max Planck Institute for Molecular Biomedicine was founded on 1 April 2001 in Münster, North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany. It is part of the Max Planck Society. The current managing director is Prof. Dr. Hans R. Schöler.

Max Planck Institute for Molecular Genetics

The Max Planck Institute for Molecular Genetics is a research institute for molecular genetics based in Berlin, Germany. It is part of the Max Planck Institute network of the Max Planck Society for the Advancement of Science.

Max Planck Institute for Polymer Research

The Max Planck Institute for Polymer Research (German: Max-Planck-Institut für Polymerforschung) is a scientific center in the field of polymer science located in Mainz, Germany. The institute was founded in 1983 by Erhard W. Fischer and Gerhard Wegner. Belonging to the Chemistry, Physics and Technology Section, it is one of the 80 institutes in the Max Planck Society (Max-Planck-Gesellschaft).

Max Planck Institute for Tax Law and Public Finance

The Max Planck Institute for Tax Law and Public Finance is an interdisciplinary research center in Munich. The Institute is part of the Max Planck Society, Germany’s foremost provider of basic research in science and humanities, funded largely from public resources.

Max Planck Institute for the Physics of Complex Systems

The Max Planck Institute for the Physics of Complex systems is one of the 80 institutes of the Max-Planck-Gesellschaft, located in Dresden, Germany.

Schloss Ringberg

Schloss Ringberg (Ringberg Castle) is located in the Bavarian Alps, 50 km south of Munich, on a foothill overlooking the Tegernsee. Not open to the general public, it is a property of the Max Planck Society and used for conferences.

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