Joey Galloway

Joseph Scott Galloway (born November 20, 1971) is a former American football wide receiver in the National Football League (NFL) and current college football analyst with ESPN. He was drafted by the Seattle Seahawks eighth overall in the 1995 NFL Draft and also played for the Dallas Cowboys, Tampa Bay Buccaneers, New England Patriots, Pittsburgh Steelers and Washington Redskins. He played college football at Ohio State. He is the NFL's career leader in receiving yards and receiving touchdowns among players to not be selected for a Pro Bowl.[1][2]

Joey Galloway
refer to caption
Galloway with the Patriots in 2009
No. 84, 13
Position:Wide receiver
Personal information
Born:November 20, 1971 (age 47)
Bellaire, Ohio
Height:5 ft 11 in (1.80 m)
Weight:197 lb (89 kg)
Career information
High school:Bellaire (OH)
College:Ohio State
NFL Draft:1995 / Round: 1 / Pick: 8
Career history
As player:
As executive:
Career highlights and awards
Career NFL statistics
Receptions:701
Receiving yards:10,950
Receiving touchdowns:77
Return touchdowns:5
Player stats at NFL.com

Early years

Galloway played high school football at Bellaire High School in Bellaire, Ohio During his senior year, he caught 52 passes for 1208 yards and eight touchdowns. He also was an All-Ohio choice in basketball and won the state championship in both the 100 and 200 meter dash in track.[3]

College career

Galloway played college football at Ohio State. While there he earned many honors and finished in the top five all time in many of Ohio State's receiving records. During his junior year, he caught 47 passes for 946 yards and tied Cris Carter with a school record 11 touchdowns.[4] His great play earned him First-Team All-Big Ten Conference honors as a junior. During his senior year, he made 44 receptions for 769 yards and seven touchdowns, and earned Second-Team All-Big Ten Conference. He finished his college career fourth in both career receptions with 108 and receiving yards with 1,494, and second in touchdown receptions behind Cris Carter with 19.[3]

Professional career

Seattle Seahawks

Galloway was selected by the Seattle Seahawks eighth overall in the 1995 NFL Draft. He made an immediate impact for the Seahawks, setting franchise season records for a rookie with 67 receptions, 1,067 receiving yards and three 100-yard games. He also had success as a punt returner, returning 36 punts for 360 yards and a touchdown.

During his second year he started all 16 games for the Seahawks, leading the team in receptions with 57, receiving yards with 987 and touchdowns with seven. During his third year in 1997 he made 72 receptions for 1,049 yards and 12 touchdowns. In 1998, he reached double digit receiving touchdowns for the second consecutive year with ten. He finished the season with 65 receptions for 1,047 yards.

During the 1999 season he played in only eight games due to a contract dispute and a holdout that reached 101 days. When he came back he made 22 receptions for 335 yards and only one touchdown. Overall, he finished his career with the Seahawks with 283 receptions for 4,457 yards and 37 touchdowns in 71 games.

On February 12, 2000, The Seahawks traded Galloway to the Dallas Cowboys in exchange for their first round selections in the 2000 and 2001 NFL Drafts (which would produce Shaun Alexander and Koren Robinson).

Dallas Cowboys

With quarterback Troy Aikman playing his last years and Michael Irvin looking to retire after suffering a career-ending injury in the 1999 season, the Dallas Cowboys were seeking an elite wide receiver to pair with Raghib Ismail and thus turned to the Seattle Seahawks for the rights to Galloway, signing him to a deal that made him the second highest paid wide receiver in the league at the time.[5]

During his first season with the Cowboys, Galloway played in only one game after tearing the ACL in his left knee in the fourth quarter of the season opener against the Philadelphia Eagles. He finished the game with four receptions for 62 yards and a touchdown. The next year, he rebounded from the injury, starting all 16 games and finishing second on the team in receptions with 72 and receiving yards with 699 and first in receiving touchdowns with three.

In 2002, Galloway started all 16 games, making 61 receptions for 908 yards and six touchdowns. In 2003, he started 13 of 14 games, making 34 catches for 672 yards and two touchdowns and led the NFL with a 19.8 yards-per-catch average. He finished his career with the Cowboys with 151 receptions for 2,341 yards and 12 touchdowns. Besides the loss of the two first round draft selections, his contract contributed to the salary cap problems that affected Dave Campo's years as head coach.

On March 19, 2004, the Cowboys traded Galloway to the Tampa Bay Buccaneers for Keyshawn Johnson.

Tampa Bay Buccaneers

Galloway suffered a groin injury in the season opener against the Washington Redskins and was inactive for the next six games of the 2004 season, playing in ten games, he made 33 receptions for 416 yards and five touchdowns. After the season, he re-signed with the Bucs.

In 2005, he enjoyed his best season as a professional, catching a career-high 83 passes (fifth in team history) for 1,287 yards (second in team history) and ten touchdowns. The next year, he started 14 of 16 games, making 62 receptions for 1,057 and seven touchdowns. It was also just the second time in Bucs history that a player had gone over the 1,000 yard receiving mark in back-to-back seasons (Keyshawn Johnson was the first).

In 2007, he played in 15 games, making 57 receptions for 1,014 yards and six touchdowns, becoming the first player in franchise history to register three consecutive 1,000-yard receiving seasons. After starting the first two games, he suffered a foot injury that forced him to miss most of 2008 season (played in 9 games), finishing with only 13 receptions for 138 yards. He was released on February 25, 2009.[6] He finished his career with the Buccaneers with 248 receptions for 3,912 yards and 28 touchdowns.

New England Patriots

Galloway signed a one-year deal with the New England Patriots on March 14, 2009, as a free agent.[7] Although healthy, he was inactive for Weeks 4-6 of the 2009 season due to a lack of production and difficulty in learning the Patriots offense.[8] He was released on October 20.[9]

Pittsburgh Steelers

On December 22, 2009, Galloway was signed as a free agent by the Pittsburgh Steelers after wide receiver Limas Sweed was placed on the Reserve/Non-Football Illness list.[10] He was not re-signed by the Steelers at the end of the season.

Washington Redskins

Galloway signed with the Washington Redskins on April 28, 2010. He was waived by the team on November 27 and wide receiver Terrence Austin was promoted from the practice squad to replace him.[11] He had 12 catches for 173 yards in 10 games.

NFL statistics

Receiving Stats[12]

Year Team Games Receptions Yards Yards per Reception Longest Reception Touchdowns First Downs Fumbles Fumbles Lost
1995 SEA 16 67 1,039 15.5 59 7 66 1 1
1996 SEA 16 57 987 17.3 65 7 42 2 2
1997 SEA 15 72 1,049 14.6 53 12 55 0 0
1998 SEA 16 65 1,047 16.1 81 10 46 1 1
1999 SEA 8 22 335 15 48 1 17 0 0
2000 DAL 1 4 62 15.5 22 1 4 0 0
2001 DAL 16 52 699 13.4 47 3 53 1 0
2002 DAL 16 61 908 14.9 80 6 33 1 1
2003 DAL 15 34 672 19.8 64 2 2 0 0
2004 TB 10 33 416 15.6 36 5 25 0 0
2005 TB 16 83 1,287 15.5 80 10 57 0 0
2006 TB 16 62 1,057 17.0 64 7 44 0 0
2007 TB 15 57 1,043 17.8 69 6 37 1 0
2008 TB 9 13 168 10.6 22 0 6 0 0
2009 NE 3 7 68 9.6 19 0 3 0 0
2009 PIT 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
2010 WSH 10 12 173 14.4 62 0 9 0 0
Career 198 701 10,950 15.6 81 77 484 6 5

Punt Returning Stats[12]

Year Team Games Attempts Yards Touchdowns Fair Catches Longest Return
1995 SEA 6 36 360 1 12 89
1996 SEA 16 15 58 1 5 88
1998 SEA 16 25 251 2 5 74
1999 SEA 8 3 54 0 21 21
2000 DAL 1 1 2 0 0 4
2001 DAL 16 1 56 0 0 6
2002 DAL 16 15 11 0 8 71
2003 DAL 15 20 178 0 6 36
2004 TB 10 20 142 1 8 9
2006 TB 15 2 3 0 0 2
2007 TB 5 3 14 0 0 10
Career 145 141 1,349 5 47 89

Post-football career

Joey Galloway ESPN set media day, Jan 2018
Galloway working with ESPN in 2018

In 2012, Galloway joined ESPN as a college football analyst.[13] Galloway co-owned the Arena Football League team Columbus Destroyers from 2003 to 2008.[14]

References

  1. ^ "Player Season Finder Query Results for combined seasons, from 1920 to 2017, requiring Pro Bowl Selct. = 0, sorted by descending Receiving Yds". Pro-Football-Reference.com. Sports Reference. Retrieved December 25, 2017.
  2. ^ "Player Season Finder Query Results for combined seasons, from 1920 to 2017, requiring Pro Bowl Selct. = 0, sorted by descending Receiving TD". Pro-Football-Reference.com. Sports Reference. Retrieved December 25, 2017.
  3. ^ a b "Joey Galloway". Washington Redskins. Archived from the original on December 7, 2010.
  4. ^ sports-reference.com https://web.archive.org/web/20151222134144/http://www.sports-reference.com/cfb/players/joey-galloway-1.html. Archived from the original on December 22, 2015. Retrieved December 13, 2015. Missing or empty |title= (help)
  5. ^ https://news.google.com/newspapers?nid=1298&dat=20000213&id=jvEyAAAAIBAJ&sjid=qwgGAAAAIBAJ&pg=6693,3009598&hl=en
  6. ^ Bucs Release Derrick Brooks, 4 Others Yahoo Sports, February 25, 2009
  7. ^ Galloway finds home in New England ESPN, March 14, 2009
  8. ^ Report: Ravens interested in Galloway? Boston Globe, October 19, 2009
  9. ^ Galloway Released Boston Herald, October 20, 2009
  10. ^ Gerry Dulac and Ed Bouchette (December 22, 2009). "Steelers sign receiver Galloway and long-snapper". Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. Retrieved December 24, 2009.
  11. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on November 29, 2010. Retrieved November 28, 2010.CS1 maint: Archived copy as title (link)
  12. ^ a b "Joey Galloway Stats". ESPN Internet Ventures. Retrieved May 29, 2014.
  13. ^ "Multiple New Roles Highlight ESPN 2012 College Football Commentator Assignments". ESPN. August 6, 2012. Retrieved November 12, 2012.
  14. ^ "Dallas Cowboys Receiver Joey Galloway Joins Columbus Destroyers Ownership Group". Arena Football League. December 8, 2003. Retrieved November 12, 2012.

External links

1995 Florida Citrus Bowl

The 1995 CompUSA Florida Citrus Bowl, part of the 1994 bowl game season, took place on January 2, 1995, at the Florida Citrus Bowl in Orlando, Florida. The competing teams were the Alabama Crimson Tide, representing the Southeastern Conference (SEC), and the Ohio State Buckeyes of the Big Ten Conference (Big 10). Alabama was victorious in by a final score of 24–17. This was the 49th Citrus Bowl played.

2000 Dallas Cowboys season

The 2000 Dallas Cowboys season was the 41st season for the team in the National Football League. Cowboys owner Jerry Jones would promote the team's long-time defensive coordinator, Dave Campo, to be the fifth head coach of the Dallas Cowboys. This was also Troy Aikman's last season with the team.

2003 Dallas Cowboys season

The 2003 Dallas Cowboys season was the 44th season for the team in the National Football League. Coming off three consecutive 5–11 seasons, Dallas hired former New York Giants, New York Jets, and New England Patriots coach Bill Parcells. In a scheduling coincidence, the Cowboys faced all three said teams in the 2003 regular season.

2006 Tampa Bay Buccaneers season

The 2006 Tampa Bay Buccaneers season was the franchise's 31st season in the National Football League the 9th playing their home games at Raymond James Stadium, and the 5th under head coach Jon Gruden.

The team failed to improve on their 11–5 record in 2005, tumbled to a 4–12 record and missed the playoffs for the first time since 2004. The next season in 2007, however, saw the Buccaneers taking a 9–7 record, but it also would be the last time the Bucs made the playoffs as of the 2018 season.

College Football Final

College Football Final is a one-hour program totally devoted to college football and airs every Saturday night during the college football season. It was previously named College Gameday Final until 2006. It is seen at 12am ET on ESPN and lasts until 1am ET (or later if a game runs over) and the program re-airs early the next morning on ESPNU and ESPN2. It is similar to ESPN's Baseball Tonight, NBA Fastbreak, NFL Live, and College GameNight, except that it only appears once a week. The program breaks down the days' games with highlights of all the biggest games, analysis of the big stories and a look ahead to next weeks' matchups.

Starting with the 2017 season with Adnan Virk hosts the show with analysis from Joey Galloway and Jesse Palmer. In 2015 it was hosted by Joe Tessitore and from 1999 to 2014, ESPN sportscasting veteran Rece Davis hosted the show. Joining Davis with analysis were College Football Hall of Fame Pittsburgh offensive lineman Mark May (since 2001) and head coach Lou Holtz. Trev Alberts, who was a former analyst on the show, resigned after the 2004 season saying, he was tired of being second to the College GameDay gang all the time; Holtz later replaced him.

College Football Scoreboard

College Football Scoreboard is a program on ESPN, ESPN2, and ABC that provides up-to-the-minute scores and highlights during the college football season. The official name is College Football Scoreboard presented by Honda. The name of the show was College Gameday Scoreboard until 2006. It airs four times a day, at 3 p.m. ET and 7 p.m. ET on ESPN and at 3 p.m. ET and 7 p.m. ET on ESPN2. It also airs on ABC as an interlude between the 12 p.m. and 3:30 p.m. afternoon games and will sometimes air before Saturday Night Football if that game starts at 7:30 p.m. ET instead of the usual 8 p.m. ET timeslot. The 3 p.m. ET programs on both networks are thirty minutes long and the 7 p.m. ET programs on both networks lead up to College Football Primetime. However, it is subject to being, and often is, pre-empted due to earlier games running long into the show's timeslot, and often games run into each other without any kind of Scoreboard interlude.

The ESPN College Football Scoreboard was hosted by Adnan Virk along with analysis from Joey Galloway and Jesse Palmer (who also appeared on the late night College Football Final). The ESPN2 version is hosted by Chris Cotter with analysis from Jim Mora and Emmanuel Acho. On ABC, it is hosted by their studio team of Kevin Negandhi, Mack Brown, and Jonathan Vilma. Both College GameDay Scoreboard groups also provide the half-time reports, post-game reports and live in-game updates from games around the country. The 7 p.m. ET versions, for both ESPN and ESPN2, lead up to ESPN College Football Primetime, which begins immediately following the show at 7:45 p.m. ET., unless otherwise pre-empted.

Danny Kanell

Daniel Kanell (born November 21, 1973) is a former professional American football quarterback in the National Football League (NFL) and Arena Football League, and former ESPN personality. He was employed by ESPN as an analyst and host on the Russillo and Kanell show on ESPN Radio. He was the host of ESPNU's late-night sports and humor show UNITE before the show was canceled in June 2013.

He would also appear on ESPN's new College Football Playoff Selection Show alongside Rece Davis, Joey Galloway, and Kirk Herbstreit. His career with ESPN ended on April 26, 2017. He is currently employed by CBS Sports, along with Fox Sports 1 and SiriusXM.

ESPN College Football Friday Primetime

ESPN College Football Friday Primetime is a live game presentation of Division 1-A college football on ESPN or sometimes ESPN2. There is no main sponsor. The game telecast airs every Friday night at 7:45pm ET during the college football regular season. In 2018, the games will be announced by Jason Benetti and Kelly Stouffer, with Olivia Harlan as the sideline reporter. The game is preceded by a 5–10 minute long segment of College Football Scoreboard with Adnan Virk, Jesse Palmer and Joey Galloway. They both also present the halftime report.

Since debuting in 2004, it has broadcast games from numerous conferences including the SEC, ACC, Big Ten and the Big East.

The biggest game for this package occurred on September 28, 2007, when the at the time fifth-ranked West Virginia Mountaineers took on the eighteenth-ranked South Florida Bulls. The game drew a 2.7 rating, the second highest since ESPN2 began televising college football.

ESPN College Football Saturday Primetime

ESPN College Football Primetime is a live game presentation of NCAA Football Bowl Subdivision college football on ESPN. In the past, the presenting sponsors have been Polaroid, AT&T and Hilton. The current presenting sponsor is Hampton by Hilton. The game telecast airs every Saturday night at 7:45pm ET during the college football regular season. The game is preceded by a 45-minute-long College Football Scoreboard with Adnan Virk, Joey Galloway and Jesse Palmer, all of whom also appear on the halftime report. This game telecast is also presented in high-definition on ESPN HD.

ESPN College Football Thursday Primetime

ESPN College Football Primetime is a live game presentation of Division 1-FBS college football on ESPN. In the past, the presenting sponsor was Cooper Tires, but since the 2006 season, the current presenting sponsor is Applebee's. The game telecast airs every Thursday night at 7:45pm ET during the college football regular season. The game is preceded by a 30-minute segment with Adnan Virk, Joey Galloway and Jesse Palmer, all of whom also appear on the halftime report. This game telecast is also presented in high definition on ESPNHD.

It has broadcast games from numerous conferences including the SEC, ACC and the Big East. This game is often seen as the ESPN Game of the Week along with the Saturday night telecast.

The most visible voices of ESPN College Football Primetime over the years have been Mike Tirico, Kirk Herbstreit and Lee Corso, but none remain in the booth, with Tirico and Herbstreit being promoted and Corso cutting back on his schedule. The current commentators are Dave Flemming on play-by-play and Laura Rutledge as field reporter along with a group of rotating ESPN analysts since 2017.

Joseph Galloway (disambiguation)

Joseph or Joe or Joey Galloway may refer to:

Joseph Galloway (1731–1803), American Loyalist and Congressman

Joseph L. Galloway (born 1941), American journalist

Joey Galloway (born 1971), American football wide receiver

List of Armed Forces Bowl broadcasters

The following is a list of the television networks and announcers who have broadcast college football's Armed Forces Bowl throughout the years.

List of ESPN College Football broadcast teams

The ESPN College Football Broadcast Teams are listed in the table below, including games broadcast on ABC, ESPN, ESPN2, ESPNU, ESPN News, SEC Network, Longhorn Network, and ESPN Radio.

Note: All ESPN games are also simulcast on WatchESPN.

Broadcast pairings for college football are weekly and are subject to change.

List of Liberty Bowl broadcasters

The following is a list of the television networks and announcers who have broadcast college football's Liberty Bowl throughout the years.

List of Military Bowl broadcasters

List of television broadcasters of the Military Bowl, which was known as the EagleBank Bowl prior to 2010.

List of Pinstripe Bowl broadcasters

The following is a list of the television networks and announcers who have broadcast college football's Pinstripe Bowl throughout the years.

List of Seattle Seahawks records

This article details statistics relating to the Seattle Seahawks NFL football team, including career, single season and game records.

Ohio State Buckeyes football statistical leaders

The Ohio State Buckeyes football statistical leaders are individual statistical leaders of the Ohio State Buckeyes football program in various categories, including passing, rushing, receiving, total offense, defensive stats, and kicking. Within those areas, the lists identify single-game, single-season, and career leaders. The Buckeyes represent the Ohio State University in the NCAA's Big Ten Conference.

Although Ohio State began competing in intercollegiate football in 1890, the school's official record book considers the "modern era" to have begun in 1944. Records from before this year are often incomplete and inconsistent, and they are generally not included in these lists.

These lists are dominated by more recent players for several reasons:

Since 1944, seasons have increased from 10 games to 11 and then 12 games in length.

The NCAA didn't allow freshmen to play varsity football until 1972 (with the exception of the World War II years), allowing players to have four-year careers.

The NCAA only began counting bowl games toward single-season and career statistics in 2002. The Buckeyes have played in 13 bowl games since then, giving many recent players an additional game to accumulate statistics. However, Ohio State's official record books included bowl games in single-season and career statistics long before the NCAA made it official policy.

The Big Ten instituted a championship game starting in 2011, allowing the top team in each division to play another game each season. The Buckeyes played in this game in 2013 and 2014 and 2017.

Since head coach Urban Meyer arrived in 2012, the Buckeyes have run a spread option offense. 2013 saw the most offensive yards in school history, and the 2014 team passed that mark. The emphasis on dual-threat quarterbacks has led to Braxton Miller and JT Barrett entering the leaderboards.These lists are updated through Ohio State's game against Michigan on November 24, 2018. The Ohio State Media Guide does not include 2010 statistics for Terrelle Pryor, Dan Herron, and DeVier Posey due to NCAA sanctions. They are fully included in these lists, however.

Ohio State Buckeyes football yearly statistical leaders

Ohio State Buckeyes football yearly statistical leaders in points scored, rushing yards, passing yards, receptions, and total tackles.

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