Joe Stydahar

Joseph Lee Stydahar (March 17, 1912 – March 23, 1977), sometimes listed as Joseph Leo Stydahar, and sometimes known by the nickname "Jumbo Joe",[1][2] was an American football player and coach. He was inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame in 1967 and the College Football Hall of Fame in 1972.

A native of Kaylor, Pennsylvania, Stydahar grew up in West Virginia and played college football and basketball for the West Virginia Mountaineers. He was drafted by the Chicago Bears in the first round of the 1936 NFL Draft and played nine seasons as a tackle for the Bears from 1936 to 1942 and 1945 to 1946. He was selected as a first-team All-Pro five consecutive years from 1936 to 1940 and helped the Bears win NFL championships in 1940, 1942, and 1946 NFL Championship Games.

After his playing career ended, Stydahar was the head coach of the Los Angeles Rams during the 1950 and 1951 seasons and the Chicago Cardinals during the 1953 and 1954 seasons. His 1950 and 1951 Rams teams both advanced to the NFL Championship Game, and the 1951 team won the championship. He also served as an assistant coach for the Rams (1947–1949) and Bears (1963–1965).

Joe Stydahar
Joe Stydahar
Position:Tackle
Personal information
Born:March 17, 1912
Kaylor, Pennsylvania
Died:March 23, 1977 (aged 65)
Beckley, West Virginia
Height:6 ft 4 in (1.93 m)
Weight:233 lb (106 kg)
Career information
High school:Shinnston (WV)
College:West Virginia
NFL Draft:1936 / Round: 1 / Pick: 6
Career history
As player:
As coach:
Career highlights and awards
Career NFL statistics
Games played:84
Fumble recoveries:2
Coaching record:20–27–1
Player stats at NFL.com
Player stats at PFR

Early years

Stydahar was born in 1912 in Kaylor, Pennsylvania,[3] the son of Peter P. Stydahar (1877-1970) and Lucille M. Stydahar (1884-1941). At age eight, he moved with his family to Shinnston, West Virginia,[4] where his father was a coal miner, and Stydahar also worked in the mines in his youth.[5] At Shinnston High School, he was regarded as "the greatest schoolboy football and basketball player ever turned out in [West Virginia]."[6]

West Virginia University

Joe Stydahar WVU
Stydahar during his collegiate career at West Virginia.

Stydahar was recruited by both the University of Pittsburgh and West Virginia University. He initially went to Pittsburgh in the fall of 1931 and participated in the football team's preliminary practices, but then showed up at West Virginia seeking to enroll.[6] According to one account, he returned home after tryouts at Pittsburgh and was taken in a car to Morgantown where he was hidden in a fraternity house by West Virginia football coach Greasy Neale "until Pitt gave up looking for him."[7]

At West Virginia, Stydahar was six feet, four inches, weighed 220 pounds, possessed "one of the largest pairs of hands in the business", and played both basketball and football. He played at the tackle position for the football team from 1933 to 1935 and developed a reputation as a "vicious tackler" and "bruising blocker".[8] As a junior in 1934, he blocked five punts and returned one of the blocks 17 yards for a touchdown. As a senior in 1935, he was responsible for stopping Pittsburgh's running game, holding the Panthers to one first down in the second half.[8]

During Stydahar's three years with the West Virginia football team, the Mountaineers compiled records of and 3-5-3, 6-4, and 3-4-2, and lost three years in a row against Pittsburgh by a combined score of 72 to 12. Sports writer Harry Grayson opined that the team's poor record and the small crowds to which it played impaired Stydahar's chances of being selected to All-America teams.[8] In 1934, Stydahar was ignored by the major All-America selectors, though he reportedly received recognition on an All-American team selected by the players on the NFL's New York Giants.[8] In 1935, the best Stydahar could muster was a selection on the Newspaper Enterprise Association's third team.[9]

Those who saw Stydahar play in college rated him among the best and was selected to play in both the East–West Shrine Game and the Chicago College All-Star Game in 1936.[7][10] Pittsburgh coach Jock Sutherland, despite having been spurned by Stydahar in 1931, rated Stydahar as the best tackle he saw during the 1935 season and added: "I doubt that there is a more formidable tackle in the country."[8] Heisman Trophy winner Jay Berwanger said: "I played in two all-star games with him and thought he was the best tackle by far of that collegiate group. He proved to me in those two games that he was a tremendous player."[2]

In basketball, Stydahar was a three-year letterman at the center position. He set a single-game scoring record with 24 points against West Virginia Wesleyan in 1933.[10]

Professional football player

While overlooked by All-America selectors, Stydahar was not overlooked in the 1936 NFL Draft. He was selected by George Halas' Chicago Bears in the first round with the sixth overall pick, becoming the first player drafted by the Bears in the first NFL draft and the first lineman to be selected in the first round.[3][7]

As a rookie, Stydahar started all 12 games at left tackle for a 1936 Chicago Bears team that compiled a 9-3 record. He was selected as a first-team All-Pro by Collyer's Eye magazine and a second-team All-Pro by the NFL and UPI.[3]

By 1937, Stydahar helped lead the Bears to the NFL Western Division title with a 9-1-1 record. He was recognized as one of the best players in the NFL, receiving the highest point total of any player at any position in voting for the Associated Press (AP) All-Pro team. The AP reported:

The standout player of the 1937 national pro football league season wasn't Slingin' Sammy Baugh . . ., but Joe Stydahar, veteran tackle of the Chicago Bears. That was the way the coaches of the 10 league clubs figured, at least, when it came to casting their ballots for the all-league team. ... Stydahar received 43 points out of a possible 50.[11]

Stydahar played nine years as a tackle for the Bears from 1936 to 1942 and from 1945 to 1946, appearing in 84 NFL games.[3] He continued to be acknowledged as one of the best players in the league through the 1930s. In 1939, the United Press rated him as "the league's best tackle" and "one of the toughest linemen in the league to take out."[12] He was also ranked third among all NFL players in points received in the AP's 1939 All-Pro voting, trailing only Don Hutson and Dan Fortmann.[13] In all, he was selected as a first-team All-Pro five consecutive years from 1936 to 1940.[3] During his time with the club, the Bears won five NFL Western Division titles (1937, 1940, 1941, 1942, and 1946) and won the 1940, 1942, and 1946 NFL Championship Games.

Stydahar missed the 1943 and 1944 NFL seasons due to military service during World War II. He served as a lieutenant and gunnery officer in the United States Navy on the USS Monterey light aircraft carrier.[7]

Coaching career

Los Angeles Rams

In February 1947, Stydahar was hired by the Los Angeles Rams as an assistant coach.[14] He served three years as the Rams' line coach from 1947 to 1949.[15]

In February 1950, Sydahar took over as the Rams' head coach.[15] In his first season as head coach, he led the 1950 Rams to the NFL Western Division championship with a 9-3 record and the top offense in the NFL (38.8 points per game).[16] In the 1950 NFL Championship Game, the Rams lost, 30-28, to the Cleveland Browns on a field goal by Lou Groza with 27 seconds remaining in the game.

In his second season with the Rams, Stydahar led the 1951 Rams to the NFL championship with a victory over the Cleveland Browns in the 1951 NFL Championship Game.[17]

Stydahar began the 1952 season as the Rams' head coach. After losing to the Cleveland Browns in the season opener, dissension between Stydahar and his backfield coach Hamp Pool became public.[18] On September 30, Stydahar reached an agreement with Rams owner Dan Reeves under which Stydahar resigned and was paid him $11,900 to buy out his contract, and Pool was promoted as the new head coach.[19]

Green Bay Packers

In mid-November 1952, Stydahar was hired by the Green Bay Packers.[20] He served as a scout and part-time assistant coach for the balance of the 1952 season.[21]

Chicago Cardinals

In January 1953, he was hired as head coach of the Chicago Cardinals.[21] His Cardinals teams compiled records of 1–10–1 in 1953 and 2–10 in 1954.[22][23] In June 1955, Stydahar and the Cardinals reached an agreement buying out the remainder of his three-year contract with the club.[24]

Chicago Bears

In February 1963, George Halas hired Stydahar as defensive line coach for the Chicago Bears.[25] Stydahar was credited with overhauling the Bears defensive line,[26] helping to lead the 1963 Bears to the best scoring defense in the NFL and an NFL championship.[27] The Bears dropped to sixth place in the Western Division in 1964,[28] and Stydahar resigned from his position with the club at the end of the 1964 season in order devote his efforts to his work for a corrugated carton company.[29]

Head coaching record

Team Year Regular season Postseason
Won Lost Ties Win % Finish Won Lost Win % Result
LA 1950 9 3 0 .750 1st in NFL National 1 1 .500 Lost to Cleveland Browns in NFL Championship.
LA 1951 8 4 0 .667 1st in NFL National 1 0 1.000 NFL Champions.
LA 1952 0 1 0 .000 2nd in NFL National 0 0 .000
LA total 17 8 0 .680 2 1 .667
CHI 1953 1 10 1 .091 6th in NFL Eastern
CHI 1954 2 10 0 .167 6th in NFL Eastern
CHI total 3 20 1 .130
NFL total[30] 20 28 1 .417 2 1 .667
Total 20 28 1 .417 2 1 .667

Honors and awards

Stydahar received numerous honors for his football career, including the following:

Family and later years

Stydahar married Yolanda Monet Margowski in 1947. They were later divorced, but they had three sons,[35] David (born 1948),[36] Joseph (born 1952),[37] and George,[35] and a daughter, Stephanie (born 1955).[38]

After being released by the Cardinals, Stydahar remained in the Chicago area where he had formed a cardboard box business with a partner. He continued in that business into the 1960s.[24][39] In his later years, Stydahar lived in Highland Park, Illinois, where he was the eastern regional manager for a container company. He died of heart failure in 1977 at age 65 while on a business trip in Beckley, West Virginia.[5] He was buried at the Shinnston Memorial Cemetery.[40]

References

  1. ^ "Joe Stydahar Bio". Pro Football Hall of Fame. Retrieved October 9, 2017.
  2. ^ a b "Joe "Jumbo Joe" Stydahar". College Football Hall of Fame. Football Foundation. Retrieved October 8, 2017.
  3. ^ a b c d e "Joe Stydahar". Pro-Football-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved October 4, 2017.
  4. ^ a b "Stydahar Joins Grid Greats". The Charleston Daily Mail. February 17, 1972. p. 5C – via Newspapers.com.
  5. ^ a b "Football Great Stydahar Dies, Had Planned To Live In Beckley". Beckley Post-Herald. March 25, 1977. p. 17 – via Newspapers.com.
  6. ^ a b "The Mountaineers All Worked Up Over the Stydahar Case". The Pittsburgh Press. September 20, 1931. p. 41 – via Newspapers.com.
  7. ^ a b c d "Services set for ex-Bear Stydahar". Chicago Tribune. March 25, 1977. p. 4-1 – via Newspapers.com.
  8. ^ a b c d e Harry Grayson (November 12, 1935). "By Harry Grayson". Muncie (IN) Evening Press. p. 10 – via Newspapers.com.
  9. ^ Bernard Bierman (December 2, 1935). "Southern Players Get Grid Spotlight". The Maryville (MO) Daily Forum. p. 8 – via Newspapers.com.
  10. ^ a b c "Joe Stydahar". West Virginia University. Retrieved October 9, 2017.
  11. ^ "Stydahar, Veteran Bear Tackle, Is Top Grid Pro". The Burlington (N.C.) Daily Times-News. December 15, 1937. p. 2.
  12. ^ "Bears Win Three Places on Pro All Star Team". The Hammond (IN) Times. December 14, 1939. p. 21 – via Newspapers.com.
  13. ^ "Four Giants Win Honors". Los Angeles Times. December 15, 1939. p. II-13 – via Newspapers.com.
  14. ^ "Joe Stydahar to Help Tutor L. A. Rams' Line". Green Bay Press-Gazette. February 7, 1947. p. 13 – via Newspapers.com.
  15. ^ a b "Stydahar To Be Coach Of Rams". The News, Frederick, Md. February 20, 1950. p. 10 – via Newspapers.com.
  16. ^ "1950 Los Angeles Rams Statistics & Players". Pro-Football-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved October 9, 2017.
  17. ^ "1950 Los Angeles Rams Statistics & Players". Pro-Football-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved October 9, 2017.
  18. ^ "Trouble Between Coaches Bared". News-Press. September 30, 1952. p. 5 – via Newspapers.com.
  19. ^ "Pool Succeeds Stydahar as Ram Coach; Joe Paid, $11,900". Los Angeles Times. October 1, 1952. p. 4-1 – via Newspapers.com.
  20. ^ "Joe Stydahar Joins Bay Staff". Green Bay Press-Gazette. November 14, 1952. p. 13 – via Newspapers.com.
  21. ^ a b "Stydahar New Cardinals Coach". The Journal and Courier (IN). January 30, 1953. p. 16 – via Newspapers.com.
  22. ^ "1953 Chicago Cardinals Statistics & Players". Pro-Football-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved October 9, 2017.
  23. ^ "1954 Chicago Cardinals Statistics & Players". Pro-Football-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved October 9, 2017.
  24. ^ a b "Grid Cards Name Richards Coach: Joe Stydahar Out; Settle 3 Season Pact". Chicago Tribune. June 3, 1955. p. 3-1 – via Newspapers.com.
  25. ^ "Bears Sign Stydahar As Defense Aid". Chicago Tribune. February 15, 1963. p. 4-1 – via Newspapers.com.
  26. ^ "Bears' Defensive Line Overhauled by Stydahar". Chicago Tribune. August 28, 1963. p. 3-1 – via Newspapers.com.
  27. ^ "1963 Chicago Bears Statistics & Players". Pro-Football-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved October 9, 2017.
  28. ^ "1964 Chicago Bears Statistics & Players". Pro-Football-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved October 9, 2017.
  29. ^ "Stydahar Resigns His Post As Line Coach for Bears". The New York Times. December 16, 1964.
  30. ^ Joe Stydahar Record, Statistics, and Category Ranks - Pro-Football-Reference.com
  31. ^ "Pro Football's Hall of Fame Is Announced". The Circleville (OH) Herald. August 3, 1950. p. 13 – via Newspapers.com.
  32. ^ "Dr. Hugh MacMillan Makes 25th Anniversary All-America". The Cumberland News. December 19, 1960. p. 6 – via Newspapers.com.
  33. ^ "Fete Ex-Bear Stydahar in Highland Park". Chicago Tribune. April 20, 1967. p. 3-3 – via Newspapers.com.
  34. ^ "All-1930's NFL Team Selected". The Baltimore Sun. August 27, 1969. p. C5.
  35. ^ a b "Former NFL Great Joe Stydahar Dies". The Cumberland News. March 25, 1977. p. 16 – via Newspapers.com.
  36. ^ "Joe Stydahar Father of Boy". Los Angeles Times. February 12, 1948. p. II-9 – via Newspapers.com.
  37. ^ "Stydahar Proud Father of Son". Redlands Daily Facts. June 27, 1952. p. 7 – via Newspapers.com.
  38. ^ "In the Wake of the News". Chicago Tribune. March 4, 1955. p. III-1 – via Newspapers.com.
  39. ^ "Ram-Bear Switch May Help Both ---Stydahar". Los Angeles Times. May 1, 1961. p. IV-2 – via Newspapers.com.
  40. ^ Shinnston News

External links

1935 West Virginia Mountaineers football team

The 1935 West Virginia Mountaineers football team represented West Virginia University as an independent during the 1935 college football season. In their second season under head coach Charles Tallman, the Mountaineers compiled a 3–4–2 record and outscored opponents by a combined total of 129 to 96. They played their home games at Mountaineer Field in Morgantown, West Virginia. Joe Stydahar was the team captain.

1936 Chicago Bears season

The 1936 Chicago Bears season was their 17th regular season completed in the National Football League. The club posted a 9–3–0 record and finished in second place in the Western Division behind the Green Bay Packers. After week 10, the Bears were tied with the Packers in first place with identical 9–1 records, having split their season series. However, the club swooned at the end of the year, losing their last two games on the road to Detroit and the Cardinals. Green Bay went on to easily defeat the Boston Redskins and win the NFL title.

1937 All-Pro Team

The 1937 All-Pro Team consisted of American football players chosen by various selectors for the All-Pro team of the National Football League (NFL) for the 1937 NFL season. Teams were selected by, among others, the NFL coaches (NFL), the International News Service (INS), the United Press (UP), Collyer's Eye (CE), and the New York Daily News (NYDN).Four players were selected for the first team by all five selectors: Detroit Lions quarterback Dutch Clark; Green Bay Packers fullback Clarke Hinkle; Washington Redskins tackle Turk Edwards; and Chicago Bears guard George Musso. Three others were named to the first team by four selectors: Washington Redskins Sammy Baugh (NFL, INS, UP, NYDN; selected as a halfback); Chicago Cardinals end Gaynell Tinsley (NFL, UP, CE, NYDN); and Chicago Bears tackle Joe Stydahar (NFL, UP, CE, NYDN). Three more were selected by three selectors: Washington Redskins halfback Cliff Battles (NFL, INS, NYDN); Green Bay Packers end Don Hutson (INS, CE, NYDN); and New York Giants center Mel Hein (NFL, INS, NYDN).

1938 All-Pro Team

The 1938 All-Pro Team consisted of American football players chosen by various selectors for the All-Pro team of the National Football League (NFL) for the 1938 NFL season. Teams were selected by, among others, the National Professional Football Writers Association (PFW), the United Press (UP), the International News Service (INS), Collyer's Eye (CE), and the New York Daily News (NYDN).Players displayed in bold were consensus first-team selections. Four players were selected for the first team by all five selectors: New York Giants halfback Ed Danowski; Green Bay Packers fullback Clarke Hinkle; New York Giants tackle Ed Widseth; and Chicago Bears guard Dan Fortmann. Another two were selected for the first team by four selectors: Brooklyn Dodgers quarterback Ace Parker (PFW, UP, INS, NYDN); Pittsburgh Pirates halfback Byron White (PFW, UP, INS, CE); and Green Bay Packers end Don Hutson (PFW, UP, INS, NYDN). Five players were selected for the first team by three selectors: Chicago Cardinals end Gaynell Tinsley (PFW, INS, CE); Philadelphia Eagles end Bill Hewitt (UP, CE, NYDN); Chicago Bears tackle Joe Stydahar (UP, INS, NYDN); Green Bay Packers guard Russ Letlow (PFW, INS, CE); and New York Giants center Mel Hein (UP, INS, NYDN).

1939 All-Pro Team

The 1939 All-Pro Team consisted of American football players chosen by various selectors for the All-Pro team of the National Football League (NFL) for the 1939 NFL season. Teams were selected by, among others, the NFL coaches (NFL), Professional Football Writers Association (PFW), the United Press (UP), the International News Service (INS), Collyer's Eye (CE), and the New York Daily News (NYDN).Players displayed in bold were consensus first-team selections. Four players were selected for the first team by all six selectors: Chicago Bears fullback Bill Osmanski; Green Bay Packers end Don Hutson; Chicago Bears tackle Joe Stydahar; and Chicago Bears guard Dan Fortmann.

1940 All-Pro Team

The 1940 All-Pro Team consisted of American football players chosen by various selectors for the All-Pro team of the National Football League (NFL) for the 1940 NFL season. Teams were selected by, among others, the so-called "official" All-Pro team selected by 92 sports writers who were members of the Pro Football Writers Association of American (PFW), the sports writers of the Associated Press (AP), the United Press (UP), the International News Service (INS), Collyer's Eye (CE), the New York Daily News (NYDN), and the Chicago Herald American.Players displayed in bold were consensus first-team selections. Three players were selected for the first team by all seven selectors: Brooklyn Dodgers quarterback Ace Parker; Brooklyn Dodgers tackle Bruiser Kinard; and Chicago Bears guard Dan Fortmann. Four others were designated for the first team by six selectors: Cleveland Rams fullback Johnny Drake; Green Bay Packers end Don Hutson; Brooklyn Dodgers end Perry Schwartz; and New York Giants center Mel Hein. Another four players were selected by five of seven selectors: Detroit Lions halfback Byron White; Washington Redskins halfback Sammy Baugh; Chicago Bears tackle Joe Stydahar; and New York Giants center Mel Hein.

1944 All-Service football team

The 1944 All-Service football team is composed of American football players who were selected as by various organizations and writers as the best football players at their respective positions who were serving in the military and playing on military service football teams in 1944.

1946 Chicago Bears season

The 1946 Chicago Bears season was their 27th regular season and ninth postseason appearance in the National Football League.

The club posted an 8–2–1 record under head coach George Halas making his return from World War II en route to a Western Division title and an appearance in the NFL Championship Game. In the title game, the Bears defeated the New York Giants for their seventh league title and their fourth of the decade.

1951 Pro Bowl

The 1951 Pro Bowl was the National Football League's inaugural Pro Bowl which featured the league's outstanding performers from the 1950 season. The game was played on Sunday, January 14, 1951, at the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum in Los Angeles, California in front of 53,676 fans. The American Conference squad defeated the National Conference by a score of 28–27. The player were selected by a vote of each conferences coaches along with the sports editors of the newspapers in the Los Angeles area, where the game was contested.The National team was led by the Los Angeles Rams' Joe Stydahar while Paul Brown of the Cleveland Browns coached the American stars. The same two coaches had faced each other three weeks earlier in the 1950 NFL Championship Game in which Brown's team had also defeated Stydahar's. Both coaches employed the T formation offense in the Pro Bowl.Cleveland Browns quarterback Otto Graham was named the game's outstanding player.

1952 Pro Bowl

The 1952 Pro Bowl was the NFL's second annual all-star game which featured the league's outstanding performers from the 1951 season. The game was played on January 12, 1952, at the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum in Los Angeles, California in front of 19,400 fans. The National Conference squad defeated the American Conference by a score of 30–13.The National team was led by the Los Angeles Rams' Joe Stydahar while Paul Brown of the Cleveland Browns coached the American stars. Los Angeles Rams running back Dan Towler was named the game's outstanding player.Each player on the victorious National roster received $600, while the losing American players took away $500 each.

1954 NFL season

The 1954 NFL season was the 35th regular season of the National Football League. The season ended when the Cleveland Browns defeated the Detroit Lions in the NFL Championship Game.

Don Dohoney

Donald Clay Dohoney (March 4, 1932 – July 4, 1993) was an American football player. He grew up in Ann Arbor, Michigan, and played college football at Michigan State College. He played both on offense and defense at the end position, was captain of Michigan State's 1953 team that won the Big Ten Conference championship and defeated UCLA in the 1954 Rose Bowl. Dohoney was a consensus selection on the 1953 College Football All-America Team.In March 1954, Dohoney signed with the Chicago Cardinals of the National Football League (1954). Chicago coach Joe Stydahar called Dohoney "the best defensive end developed in college ball in a great many years. He rushes the passer real good, plays the running game well and is one of the most rugged players we've seen." In June 1954, he was added to the lineup of college all-stars who played the NFL champion Detroit Lions in the annual Chicago College All-Star Game. According to records of Pro-Football-Reference.com, Dohoney did not appear in any regular season games in the NFL.Dohoney died in 1993 at Meridian, Michigan.

Fred Gillies

Frederick Montague Gillies (December 9, 1895 – May 8, 1974) was an American football player and coach for the Chicago Cardinals of the National Football League. He graduated from Cornell University in 1918 and was a member of the Quill and Dagger society. He appeared in 72 games, 51 of which as a starter, as a tackle for the Chicago Cardinals between 1920 and 1933, earning All-Pro honors in 1922. He coached the team in 1928, which was his final season as a player and only as a coach, to a 1-5 record.

Fred later married Blanche Wilderand and adopted Theo Janet Howells, the biological daughter of Blanche's sister, Gertrude Wilder. Gillies also worked and volunteered for the Republican Party.

In 1932, he was a survivor in a plane crash that took the life of aviator Eddie Stinson, the founder of Stinson Aircraft Company. Gillies suffered a leg injury, as a result of the accident, which left him in a leg brace for the rest of his life.

Kaylor, Pennsylvania

Kaylor is an unincorporated community in northern Cambria County, Pennsylvania, United States. It lies between Jamestown and Altoona, about 80 miles east of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. It is the birthplace of the football player Joe Stydahar.

List of Arizona Cardinals head coaches

The Arizona Cardinals are a professional American football team based in Glendale, Arizona. They are a member of the Western Division of the National Football Conference (NFC) in the National Football League (NFL). The team began as the Morgan Athletic Club in 1898 in Chicago, Illinois. The team's second name was the Racine Normals, since it played at Normal Field on Racine Street. In 1901, they were renamed to the Racine Street Cardinals, a name that came from the University of Chicago jerseys that the team used, which were described as "Cardinal red". The team was established in Chicago in 1898 and was a charter member of the NFL in 1920. The team has played their home games at the University of Phoenix Stadium since 2006 and is the oldest franchise in the NFL.The team has moved to numerous cities during its history. After staying in Chicago from 1920 to 1959, it moved to St. Louis, Missouri and remained there from 1960 to 1987. It played in Tempe, Arizona, from 1988 to 2005, before eventually settling in Glendale, Arizona in 2006, where it now resides. Since 1920, two Cardinals coaches have won the NFL Championship: Norman Barry in 1925 and Jimmy Conzelman in 1947. Five other coaches—Don Coryell, Jim Hanifan, Vince Tobin, Ken Whisenhunt and Bruce Arians—have led the Cardinals to the playoffs, and in 2009 they went to the Super Bowl.There have been 40 head coaches for the Cardinals franchise since it became a professional team in 1920; fourteen of the team's coaches are former Cardinals players. Ernie Nevers and Jimmy Conzelman are the only coaches to have had more than one tenure with the team. Pop Ivy and Gene Stallings both coached the team during its move from one city to another. Cardinals coach Roy Andrews is tied for the lowest winning percentage among the team's coaches (.000), having lost the only game he coached, in 1931. Co-coach Walt Kiesling lost all 10 games he coached in 1943, when the team merged with the Steelers during World War II and was known as Card-Pitt. Co-coaches Ray Willsey, Ray Prochaska, and Chuck Drulis have the highest winning percentage among Cardinals coaches (1.000). The team's all-time leader in games coached is Ken Whisenhunt, who was hired on January 14, 2007, with 96. Whisenhunt was fired on December 31, 2012, after the Cardinals recorded a 5–11 record in 2012.The all-time leader in wins is Arians with 50, including one playoff victory. The all-time leader in wins is Bruce Arians with 50, including one playoff victory.

List of Chicago Bears first-round draft picks

The Chicago Bears are an American football franchise based in Chicago, Illinois. They are members of the National Football Conference (NFC) North division in the National Football League (NFL). They participated in the first ever NFL draft in 1936 and selected Joe Stydahar, a tackle from West Virginia University. Stydahar went to have a stellar career with the franchise and is inducted in the Pro Football Hall of Fame. The team's most recent first round selection (2018) was Roquan Smith, an inside linebacker from Georgia. The Bears have not had first round selections a total of six times, most recently in 2010. The Bears have only selected the number one overall pick in the draft twice, choosing Tom Harmon in 1941 and Bob Fenimore in 1947. The team's six selections from the University of Texas are the most chosen by the Bears from one program. Nine of the first round selections have been inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame.

Every year during April, each NFL franchise seeks to add new players to its roster through a collegiate draft known as "the NFL Annual Player Selection Meeting", which is more commonly known as the NFL Draft. The NFL Draft, as a whole, gives the advantage to the teams that did poorly the previous season. The 30 teams that did not make the Super Bowl are ranked in order so the team with the worst record picks first and the team with the best record pick last. The two exceptions to this inverse order are made for teams that appeared in the previous Super Bowl; the Super Bowl champion selects 32nd overall, and the Super Bowl loser selects 31st overall. If the franchise so chooses, they may trade their draft picks for any combination of draft picks, players, and money.

List of Chicago Bears players

The following are lists of past and current players of the Chicago Bears professional American football team.

Ray Richards

Raymond W. Richards (July 16, 1906 – September 18, 1974) was an American football player and coach on both the college and professional levels, including head coach for the Chicago Cardinals of the National Football League (NFL).

Richards was an All-American lineman at the University of Nebraska from 1927 to 1929, then joined the NFL's Frankford Yellow Jackets in 1930. During his playing days, he became known for a notorious move that has since been outlawed: the "lift", in which Richards used his elbow to hit the opposing center as he snapped the ball. Moves such as that helped him in his off-season pursuit of wrestling, an endeavor that saw him travel across the country competing in matches.

Richards played two seasons with the Yellow Jackets until the team disbanded in 1931, then he shifted to Chicago, where he played another two seasons with George Halas's Bears. In 1934, he moved on to play a season with the Detroit Lions, who had just moved from their previous home in Portsmouth, Ohio. After a final season with the Bears the next year, Richards headed west to serve as a player-coach for two seasons with the Los Angeles Bulldogs of the fledgling American Football League, helping the team finish undefeated during his second year.

On April 5, 1937, he was appointed line coach at UCLA, where he served under three different head coaches over the next decade. In an era marked by the looming specter of World War II, Richards was part of two Bruin squads that competed in the Rose Bowl. He resigned on December 11, 1947, and took a similar position in 1948 at nearby Pepperdine University.

One season working with the Waves' linemen led to Richards's promotion to head coach on April 26, 1949. After two seasons in that capacity, he was let go on January 19, 1951 due to budget cuts, but found work seven weeks later as an assistant with the NFL's Los Angeles Rams. During his first year working under close friend Joe Stydahar, the team captured the NFL championship, but then dropped a first-round playoff game in 1952 after Stydahar was fired early in the season.

Richards was dismissed after the season, but was hired by the Baltimore Colts on January 12, 1953. When Stydahar was named head coach of the Chicago Cardinals just weeks later, he attempted to bring Richards along, but NFL commissioner Bert Bell stopped this effort, citing Richards's signed contract with the Colts.

After a disastrous campaign in which the Colts finished 3–9, Richards was among the coaches let go, allowing him to join the Cardinals' staff. The 1954 campaign proved to be even worse as the team won just two of 12 games, giving them a 3–20–1 record under Stydahar's leadership.

That lack of success resulted in a coaching change on June 2, 1955, when Stydahar was fired and Richards was elevated to head coach. Following a 4–7–1 season, the team appeared to be improving with a 7–5 mark in 1956. However, a 3–9 season the year after made another coaching change inevitable, and Richards resigned on January 4, 1958. Among the reasons Richards was unable to fashion a winner was his insistence on playing quarterback Lamar McHan, whose lack of leadership skills were often cited as the team's weak spot.

Richards's last stop came one month later when he was hired as defensive assistant under Ray McLean with the Green Bay Packers. However, a 1–10–1 finish in the 1958 season resulted in Richards announcing his retirement from coaching.

In his post-football career, Richards served as a vice president of Pemaco, Inc., a Los Angeles-based chemical company. He died of lung cancer in Brea, California at the age of 68.

West Virginia Mountaineers football

The West Virginia Mountaineers football team represents West Virginia University (also referred to as "WVU" or "West Virginia") in the NCAA Football Bowl Subdivision (FBS) of college football. West Virginia plays its home games on Mountaineer Field at Milan Puskar Stadium on the campus of West Virginia University in Morgantown, West Virginia. The Mountaineers compete in the Big 12 Conference.

With a 752–495–45 record as of the conclusion of the 2018 season, WVU ranks 14th in victories among NCAA FBS programs, and has the most victories among those programs that never claimed nor won a national championship. West Virginia was originally classified as a College Division school in the 1937 season, and joined the University Division, forerunner of Division I, in 1939. It has been a member of Division I FBS since 1978 (known as Division I-A until 2006). The Mountaineers have registered 82 winning seasons in their history, including one unbeaten season (10–0–1) in 1922 and nine seasons with at least ten wins (1922, 1969, 1988, 1993, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2011, 2016). The Mountaineers have won or shared a total of 15 conference championships, including eight Southern Conference titles and seven Big East Conference titles.

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